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Old 09-10-2010, 05:00 PM   #10
ATDrake
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Aesop and Sherlock are especially nice editions. While the actual Fables are naturally very short, the Introduction goes into great lengths into the underlying themes and lessons contained within, and the Inspired By section argues that Orwell's Animal Farm draws a lot from the Aesopian tradition.

And while there are probably even better annotated Holmeses available, given the scholarly popularity and breadth of Sherlockiana, this one is pretty good, even if it doesn't seem to include the original illustrations from the Strand serializations.

But it's got a couple of parodies written by Conan Doyle himself, along with some articles he wrote for some magazine in response to all the uproar after ACD killed Holmes off (he got better). Plus the always helpful notes on Victorian London locales and customs.

As for the added B&N e-Classics, I really think they're trying to achieve title parity with the print editions. Back at the beginning of the promo, there were only 149 or so that I'd counted while trying to figure out how much it would cost to pick up the rest if I wanted to complete the set. Since then, they've added over 50 and apparently there's only a handful left.

Oh, and I should mention that the Iliad and Odyssey, while older translations and probably not the best, do come with very useful notes and explanations which make up for any lack in the poetry/meaning department. Plus the Iliad has a pronunciation guide for accenting the Greek names in the back.

Some of the recent new editions include Aristotle, Thucydides, Herodotus, the Aeneid, and Bulfinch's Mythology and Machiavelli's The Prince. If B&N should happen to one day do a "(Neo-)Classical Classics" freebie theme week; well, I won't exactly do the dance of joy, but I'll be more than happy to throw extra money at Fictionwise for MultiFormat stuff with a sale/discount coupon before B&N's "management" kills them off entirely.
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