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Old 07-24-2010, 10:21 AM   #2
pholy
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pholy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.pholy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.pholy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.pholy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.pholy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.pholy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.pholy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.pholy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.pholy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.pholy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.pholy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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In html, the & character is an escape character which should introduce a named or numbered character entity. It is not clear to me (I can't find a reference) what should happen when there is no valid entity after the & character. So locking up is a possibility; but not a good choice, of course. The title and author, of course, are meta data, part of the html, so, no bare-naked & allowed. If you must have an & in meta data, it should be expressed as & or & - but I haven't tested that anywhere - an exercise for the interested student... or something to add to the epub conformance tests.

In most Linux shells, the & character is the backgrounding operator, so if you must have a & in a filename, you have to quote the filename. Since you can't know how the reader's embedded code handles filenames, the & is best avoided in filenames, as well.
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