View Full Version : The future through the eyes of the MPAA/RIAA


Barcey
04-19-2010, 06:35 PM
When Amazon deleted ebooks from Kindles it appears that the entertainment industry thought, "What a great idea."

The EFF has published an article about their submission to the "Joint Strategic Plan" of the Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator.

http://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/04/entertainment-industrys-dystopia-future


We're not easily shocked by entertainment industry overreaching; unfortunately, it's par for the course. But we were taken aback by the wish list the industry submitted in response to the Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator's request for comments on the forthcoming "Joint Strategic Plan" for intellectual property enforcement. The comments submitted by various organizations provide a kind of window into how these organizations view both intellectual property and the public interest.


Also from Tom's Guide

http://www.tomsguide.com/us/RIAA-MPAA-Illegal-downloads-Torrent,news-6496.html


Big Brother is watching you. Actually, it's the RIAA and the MPAA, especially if you're parked on a BitTorrent client. The Electronic Frontier Foundation reports that both organizations--along with a few others--want to take the file-monitoring process a huge step further by infiltrating consumer PCs and deleting the infringing content off their hard drives. How? Through "anti-infringement" spyware developed and enforced by the government.


I have an alternative solution. Why don't we just get rid of copyright? That will remove all the potential copyright infringing content from my computer too.

Elfwreck
04-19-2010, 07:06 PM
I'm endlessly amused by the entertainment industry's notion that you can identify "infringing content" with a program. (And a bit worried, maybe, because the people making the ultimate decisions about this are possibly less technologically aware than my teenager.)

They can't tell the difference between "a copy of Tales of Beedle the Bard downloaded from the darknet" and "a copy of the same book that I scanned & OCR'd myself." And of course, they'd have trouble identifying the book in txt form, titled tobtb_jkr.txt, instead of a traditional ebook format. (They might have a scanner that looks inside the text document. *MY* that's a lot of wasted processing time. It takes quite a long while to view the contents of every text file on a hard drive--comparing them against an outside database would be an incredible drain on resources.

I have no idea how they think they could identify DRM-cracked content; the filename may not be the same; the filesize won't be the same; the metadata may-or-may-not be the same (and there's no crime or even infringement in having metadata that matches something else). I suspect what they want to do is visit the torrents, grab something popular, and scan people's computers for copies of that exact file; p2p networking requires identical copies to be most effective. (Filesharing services like Rapidshare & Megaupload don't, so people would start renaming & otherwise tweaking those files in order to prevent an exact match in case of digital search.)

Of course, they're only talking about "infringing" content that relates to professionally published, mainstream books/songs/movies; they're not interested in preventing infringement against small indie publishers or individuals.

RobbieClarken
04-20-2010, 06:14 AM
I have no idea how they think they could identify DRM-cracked content; the filename may not be the same; the filesize won't be the same; the metadata may-or-may-not be the same (and there's no crime or even infringement in having metadata that matches something else). I suspect what they want to do is visit the torrents, grab something popular, and scan people's computers for copies of that exact file; p2p networking requires identical copies to be most effective. (Filesharing services like Rapidshare & Megaupload don't, so people would start renaming & otherwise tweaking those files in order to prevent an exact match in case of digital search.)

I imagine hash functions would be a reasonable efficient way to look for infringing content and wouldn't pick up false positives like you mentioned. They could also have some form of digital watermark to look for.

Sure it would be possible to get around these systems by changing metadata or removing the watermarks but the point isn't to catch every infringer. I suspect a large proportion of people don't modify the files they illegally download. If you can detect some percentage of these people you might be able to scare them and others away from piracy.

The goal isn't to make piracy impossible (that'll never happen); the goal is to raise the cost of piracy relative to legal channels.

sabredog
04-20-2010, 07:08 AM
I am constantly amazed at why industry groups like the RIAA and MPAA (include the Agency Five as well) persist on antiquated distribution models. It seems they are either afraid of losing control or losing money (perhaps both)

For the last thirty years, movies for consumer purchase have carried anti-piracy warnings of some form on them. With video tape you could fast forward them, DVD's you are forced to sit through entertainment industry propaganda. Nothing new really.

If they bring themselves into the digital age and thus offer consumers more incentives not to download (such as cheaper DVD's/Blu-ray, streaming downloads and movie downloads), then perhaps things will change. But I fear not.

ficbot
04-20-2010, 08:08 AM
I would have to think accessing your computer would be illegal. First of all, I keep some banking and medical info on my computer and I am not sure I want Big Corporate being able to troll through it looking for Harry Potter ebooks. Second of all, I think the non-digital analogue action would be completely illegal (police randomly coming in and searching through people's homes without cause looking for stolen goods) so I don't see how the digital equivalent would be allowed. Think about it, if the police knocked on your door and said 'excuse me, but some people steal books and keep them in their homes, do you mind if we just come in and have a look for anything like that' you'd be on the phone to a lawyer ASAP.

Blue Tyson
04-20-2010, 10:51 AM
Plus, of course, it would take about 10 minutes for the cyber-criminals who are way smarter than they are to get all that data...

mr ploppy
04-20-2010, 01:12 PM
It seems they are either afraid of losing control or losing money (perhaps both)


I suspect what they are really afraid of is that established creators will realise that they no longer need them, and can easily reach their audience by themselves the same way that a lot of new and upcoming creators are doing.

Elfwreck
04-20-2010, 01:56 PM
I would have to think accessing your computer would be illegal.

Of course. Hence the need to change laws.

They won't want to be searching every computer at random--they want the right to insist that upload/doc storage sites hand over their usage records so they can search the computer of anyone who uploaded or downloaded any file they find objectionable, and that any computer involved in P2P sharing is searchable.

No idea if they'd want, for example, Mobileread to hand over its usage records of who downloaded what books, to find out if US residents were downloading books that are public domain in Canada but not the US. (So far, it seems it's mostly the music/movies people getting into the laws; ebooks aren't directly on the radar right now.)

ficbot
04-20-2010, 02:05 PM
No idea if they'd want, for example, Mobileread to hand over its usage records of who downloaded what books, to find out if US residents were downloading books that are public domain in Canada but not the US.

But even that is not something really fair to access a computer for. For example, if my American sister comes to visit me, stays in my house and uses my wifi to download an ebook onto her own laptop pr phone, then she could take the computer home with her, have the file in there, still be allowed to use it since she legally downloaded it here (the same way I could go to an American store in America, buy a physical object and bring it home with me to Canada). Just saying she has it on her computer does not mean she acquired it illegally.

Elfwreck
04-20-2010, 04:16 PM
But even that is not something really fair to access a computer for. ... Just saying she has it on her computer does not mean she acquired it illegally.

Noticed that, have you? That's what the EFF and copyfight activists are upset about.

The RIAA & MPAA don't want to "enforce copyright;" they want to monitor your every online action, and remove any content from your computer they don't like. They're certainly not asking for the right to monitor those computers *in order to file lawsuits* against copyright infringers; they want to take action without the hassle of going to court.

Of *course* they'd never go after your sister for downloading some ebooks while visiting a different country! They're not OGRES, you know! They only want to go after criminals!

Which they will identify by using software that accurately identifies unauthorized copyrighted material.

ficbot
04-20-2010, 05:00 PM
Which brings to mind a certain phrase about the road to hell and what it is paved with :)

dmaul1114
04-20-2010, 05:06 PM
I think the "dream" future of publishers, record labels, movie studies etc. is one where super high speed internet is available to all and they can just sell access to all their content in streaming versions and not have many (or any) physical copies for sale.

Pirates would still capture streams etc., but they'd be happy to at least kill off the second hand market, loaning/borrowing etc.

It's seems all bad--but the older I get the more I'd go for it as I look at my shelves of DVDs/blu rays, CDs, books etc. that seldom every get touched as I just watch the latest movie I have from Netflix or listen to streaming music online or ripped MP3 versions of my CDs etc.

If we had super high speed and reliable internet, and Netflix has their entire collection available in streaming, I'd gladly sell/donate my 300+ movies so I could stream them in time I wanted for a monthly subscription fee. Same with my CDs if the internet was global wireless and I could listen to anything, anytime, anywhere.

And same for books since I seldom re-read anything. On that front I wish come company would come up with an e-book rental scheme so I don't have to buy e-books I'll read once etc.

In any case, back on topic, that type of digital streaming world is what I think publishers really salivate over as it gives them what they want--as much control over their content as possible.

pilotbob
04-20-2010, 05:17 PM
If they do this I am installing True Crypt on my machine. They have no right to search my machine and decide what they think is in violation.

That said, I am pretty sure doing this would violate several of the bill of rights. (in the US).

BOb

Manichean
04-20-2010, 06:00 PM
If they do this I am installing True Crypt on my machine. They have no right to search my machine and decide what they think is in violation.
Not to be a nitpicker, but I believe Truecrypt would be useless once you get what is essentially a trojan onto your computer. Mind you, you'd have to access your Truecrypt archive sometime to get the data...

This sounds like a debate we had not too long ago here in Germany. Google for "Bundestrojaner" if you're interested. (Basically, it amounted to searches done via the internet or such would be in violation of the constitution, IIRC.)

CyGuy
04-21-2010, 10:09 AM
Motion
Picturists
Against
Americans


Recording
Industry
Against
Americans

Seriously though, I doubt that they would be able to get away with this. They can't search anyone's personal property without a warrant.

Shaggy
04-21-2010, 10:33 AM
Of *course* they'd never go after your sister for downloading some ebooks while visiting a different country! They're not OGRES, you know! They only want to go after criminals!


In their world, anyone who doesn't pay them lots of money must be a criminal.

Ralph Sir Edward
04-21-2010, 01:19 PM
I think the "dream" future of publishers, record labels, movie studies etc. is one where super high speed internet is available to all and they can just sell access to all their content in streaming versions and not have many (or any) physical copies for sale.

Pirates would still capture streams etc., but they'd be happy to at least kill off the second hand market, loaning/borrowing etc.

It's seems all bad--but the older I get the more I'd go for it as I look at my shelves of DVDs/blu rays, CDs, books etc. that seldom every get touched as I just watch the latest movie I have from Netflix or listen to streaming music online or ripped MP3 versions of my CDs etc.

If we had super high speed and reliable internet, and Netflix has their entire collection available in streaming, I'd gladly sell/donate my 300+ movies so I could stream them in time I wanted for a monthly subscription fee. Same with my CDs if the internet was global wireless and I could listen to anything, anytime, anywhere.

And same for books since I seldom re-read anything. On that front I wish come company would come up with an e-book rental scheme so I don't have to buy e-books I'll read once etc.

In any case, back on topic, that type of digital streaming world is what I think publishers really salivate over as it gives them what they want--as much control over their content as possible.



You may not be aware but the Google "Orphan Books" initative is going to be a streaming read format, not a download format....

asjogren
04-21-2010, 11:00 PM
Image the fun we could have with "fake" infringements!!! Especially if there is a monetary penalty for deleting a file from my computer that they don't own!

MovieBird
04-21-2010, 11:27 PM
If we had super high speed and reliable internet, and Netflix has their entire collection available in streaming, I'd gladly sell/donate my 300+ movies so I could stream them in time I wanted for a monthly subscription fee. Same with my CDs if the internet was global wireless and I could listen to anything, anytime, anywhere.

The issue I have with this, is that NOT everything is available for streaming. There just isn't the storage on servers for that. Whenever I go to my parent's house, who have cable where I don't own a TV, I notice that HBO, Showtime, etc. shows only keep about 10 episodes on hand at any given time. What if I want to power through an entire season of Entourage one Saturday because my girlfriend left me and I need cheering up?

Or what if I want to do the entire Sopranos from start to finish in a month? Nuh uh! You only get to watch the few episodes offered this week, and get a few more next week when they're incremented.

The few music streaming services I've tried seem to pick one or two popular songs from an artist, and ignore the rest of their catalog. They also don't seem to have an eclectic mix.

Until this whole storage thing gets solved, having everything streaming just isn't viable, even with all the dark fiber laying around.

I have to say that in 1981, making those decisions, I felt like I was providing enough freedom for 10 years. That is, a move from 64k to 640k felt like something that would last a great deal of time. Well, it didn't - it took about only 6 years before people started to see that as a real problem.

CyGuy
04-22-2010, 09:49 AM
If we had super high speed and reliable internet, and Netflix has their entire collection available in streaming, I'd gladly sell/donate my 300+ movies so I could stream them in time I wanted for a monthly subscription fee. Same with my CDs if the internet was global wireless and I could listen to anything, anytime, anywhere.

And same for books since I seldom re-read anything. On that front I wish come company would come up with an e-book rental scheme so I don't have to buy e-books I'll read once etc.

I am the extreme opposite of this mentality. I almost never stream anything, and I have no desire to. I keep all of my content with me, mostly on SDHC cards, but I also have a couple of external HDD and USB thumb drives. I do not ever want to be reliant on an Internet connection just to read a book or watch a movie, that is a huge step backwards for me.

mr ploppy
04-22-2010, 11:42 AM
The few music streaming services I've tried seem to pick one or two popular songs from an artist, and ignore the rest of their catalog. They also don't seem to have an eclectic mix.

But the governments of the world point at those services and say that everything you could possibly want is there already, so there is no excuse for piracy.

Though I'm sure that having a population that only listens to aproved music, only reads aproved books, and only watches aproved videos is a lot of the appeal.

Shaggy
04-22-2010, 01:07 PM
Especially if there is a monetary penalty for deleting a file from my computer that they don't own!

Don't hold your breath for that one.

dmaul1114
04-22-2010, 02:03 PM
I am the extreme opposite of this mentality. I almost never stream anything, and I have no desire to. I keep all of my content with me, mostly on SDHC cards, but I also have a couple of external HDD and USB thumb drives. I do not ever want to be reliant on an Internet connection just to read a book or watch a movie, that is a huge step backwards for me.

It definitely would be currently.

But if in 50 years there's blazing fast wireless internet freely available worldwide that pretty much never has outages etc....then I could go for it.

With today's splotchy internet service, huge geographic gaps in availability of broadband, still pretty high costs for broadband which keep everyone from being able to have access etc. it would be a huge step backwards.

Solve that problem (which will take decades) and my resistance would melt as I'm getting tired of having stuff I never use clutter up the house. One of these days I just need to bite the bullet, quit holding on to this stuff and have a garage sell or just say screw it and donate cds, dvds etc. that never get used. I've been gradually getting rid of stuff, but have a hard time parting with a lot of movies I feel I may want to watch again some day etc.

Hell, even a burglary would be fine as at least then I could get insurance money for all this crap!

dmaul1114
04-22-2010, 02:05 PM
Until this whole storage thing gets solved, having everything streaming just isn't viable, even with all the dark fiber laying around.


Agreed. But like I said I was talking 50-100 in the future where all the internet speed, coverage, storage and other issues have been resolved.

It's not something coming any time soon.

Shaggy
04-22-2010, 02:19 PM
It's not something coming any time soon.

Or ever.

dmaul1114
04-22-2010, 02:22 PM
Or ever.

You can never say never. :D

I think we'll get their eventually when internet es everywhere and everything in on cloud storage etc.

Will it be in our lifetimes? Probably not in terms of that being where all content is. But we'll probably get to the point where one can stream pretty much any movie or book or song they want in the next 50-75 years if I had to guess.

But not to the point that one can't buy a digital version to keep on their own storage. And maybe that part will never happen. But I think it will as publishers, labels, game developers etc. have a huge incentive to see it happen as it would completely end all used sales.

CyGuy
04-22-2010, 02:47 PM
But if in 50 years there's blazing fast wireless internet freely available worldwide that pretty much never has outages etc....then I could go for it.

I would hope that in 50 years, SD cards will hold 10 terabytes of data and you can just have what you want with you already, no need to access the Internet for content. I just don't want to rely on any kind of network connection for my content when I can just have it with me at all times. As far as all those DVD's and CD's on your shelves, just convert them to a digital format that you can keep on a HDD, then store the originals in the attic or basement...

dmaul1114
04-22-2010, 02:53 PM
As far as all those DVD's and CD's on your shelves, just convert them to a digital format that you can keep on a HDD, then store the originals in the attic or basement...

I just don't have the time or patience to convert the DVDs. CDs have long since been converted.

I also own a condo with very little closet space and no attic or basement.

The CDs I don't mind so much as I know I'll want to have that music around in case all my MP3 backups get lost.

The movies I just need to bring myself to whittle down to 100 or so as I can always Netflix any movie I want to watch. I've cut way down on movie buying the past 2 or 3 years since relying more on Netflix (and getting busier and not having as much time to watch movies0

Shaggy
04-22-2010, 03:05 PM
You can never say never. :D


Originally you said free wireless that pretty much never has outages. I'm pretty sure you can chalk that up under "never".


But we'll probably get to the point where one can stream pretty much any movie or book or song they want in the next 50-75 years if I had to guess.

The same will happen that always happens, as bandwidth speeds go up. so do the bandwidth requirements. Could everyone easily stream today's version of a movie with the bandwidth speeds/availability we'll likely have in 50 years, probably. But by then the data formats will be an equal number of orders of magnitude larger as well. 50 years from now, movie/book/song digital data will also look a lot different than it does today. It's not just one side of the equation that will scale upwards.

It'd be like kids 20 years ago talking about how fast they could play the latest 4-bit graphics game on a "futuristic" computer compared to their 25MHz PC. Sure, we've got 4GHz PCs now, but not many people want to play 20 year old games on them. Modern content stresses modern hardware, they go hand in hand.

Shaggy
04-22-2010, 03:07 PM
I just don't have the time or patience to convert the DVDs.

These days, ripping a DVD is basically as easy as ripping a CD, and almost as fast.

dmaul1114
04-22-2010, 03:09 PM
These days, ripping a DVD is basically as easy as ripping a CD, and almost as fast.

Sure, I wasn't saying it was complicated or anything. But still takes a long time to do 300+ of them!

Took me like 6 months several years ago to finally get all my 300 some CDs ripped.

On top of that, I'd feel too guilty keeping the digital files and selling/donating the DVDs--which is what I need to do as storage isn't an option.

dmaul1114
04-22-2010, 03:14 PM
Originally you said free wireless that pretty much never has outages. I'm pretty sure you can chalk that up under "never".


I still wouldn't put it under never. Some european countries already provide free internet--as do some cities in the US. So the free part can happen.

Almost never being down simply requires having a complex system of back ups in place. There will always be outages, but they can be limited. Hell, I have at most one or two days a year that my internet is down for a few hours.



The same will happen that always happens, as bandwidth speeds go up. so do the bandwidth requirements. Could everyone easily stream today's version of a movie with the bandwidth speeds/availability we'll likely have in 50 years, probably. But by then the data formats will be an equal number of orders of magnitude larger as well. 50 years from now, movie/book/song digital data will also look a lot different than it does today. It's not just one side of the equation that will scale upwards.

It'd be like kids 20 years ago talking about how fast they could play the latest 4-bit graphics game on a "futuristic" computer compared to their 25MHz PC. Sure, we've got 4GHz PCs now, but not many people want to play 20 year old games on them. Modern content stresses modern hardware, they go hand in hand.

Fair points I suppose. But there's only so much higher resolution on movies, for example, can go and get appreciable benefit to the human eye. So to some regard there's a limit on how big media files can get. We'll have 3D etc., but that shouldn't really take much more space etc.

But you are right that it will be a challenge for bandwith speed to keep up as it always has been.

Two huge areas where the human race is doing a pathetic job at innovation is speed of data communications and the global infrastructure for it. And battery technology (or alternate power sources for portable devices).

But in any case, if I can't stream most any content I want in 15-20 years I'll be very dissappointed.

But I think we'll get there. Netflix already has what, 15,000 movies to stream. A pittance of all the films ever made, but a pretty big number given current technology and a streaming service that is a free add on to a disc rental service. So I'd be shocked if they (or another comopany) didn't have most every movie I'd want to watch streaming in 20 years.

Shaggy
04-22-2010, 03:14 PM
On top of that, I'd feel too guilty keeping the digital files and selling/donating the DVDs

You didn't mention that part, unless I missed it.

Yes, that changes things. That's a legal problem, not a time/patience issue.

dmaul1114
04-22-2010, 03:17 PM
You didn't mention that part, unless I missed it.

Yes, that changes things. That's a legal problem, not a time/patience issue.

I mentioned above that I'm in a condo and thus don't have much closet space and no attic or basement. And it would be stupid to pay for a storage unit etc.

But the time/patience issue would keep me from doing it anyway even if I had a house. Easier to just man up and get rid of most of them and just Netflix them if I want to watch one of them down the road, vs. wasting pressure free time on ripping them to digital files that I'll still seldom (if ever) watch again.

pilotbob
04-22-2010, 03:20 PM
On top of that, I'd feel too guilty keeping the digital files and selling/donating the DVDs--which is what I need to do as storage isn't an option.

Of course you really should destroy them. I am digitizing my DVD collection. I use RipIt... you can set it to rip auto on insert and eject when done. So, just keep a stack near the Mac... every time I see a DVD popped out, I can just pop another one into it.

While I am not destroying my DVDs I am going to pack them up and store rather than needing them to be on the book shelves.

I am also digitizing most of my documents/receipts etc and shredding. I store the scans in evernote so it is easy to search and backed up on their servers.

I already do pretty much 100% of my financial stuff online and have all documents delivered electronically. Maybe in my life time I will save a tree or two. ;)

BOb

dmaul1114
04-22-2010, 03:24 PM
Yeah, maybe some day I'd get around to it. I just loathed doing my CD collection. I did it like you describe, just pop them in randomly while doing stuff around the house. Still took me over 6 months to get around to doing all of them.

Another problem currently is I don't have (nor really need) an home theater PC so I don't have any way of getting ripped DVDs displayed on my TV without buying something. And my HDTV lacks a computer input (and my laptop only has the VGA out) so that complicates things currently as well.

What I need to do is just ditch the DVDs, keep the blu rays--upgrade a few more things I own on DVD that are favorites to Blu Ray and the problem will be solved.

I used to want a big film library. But now that I'm older, busier and space in the house is at a premium being a city dweller, I've kind of changed my mind on that. Better to get down to a smaller library of 50-100 absolute favorites and just use Netflix mainly.

pilotbob
04-22-2010, 03:26 PM
Another problem currently is I don't have (nor really need) an home theater PC so I don't have any way of getting ripped DVDs displayed on my TV without buying something. And my HDTV lacks a computer input (and my laptop only has the VGA out) so that complicates things currently as well.


I know where you're coming from on the time.

Do you have a TiVo or XBox 360?

BOb

dmaul1114
04-22-2010, 03:34 PM
I know where you're coming from on the time.

Do you have a TiVo or XBox 360?

BOb


I do have an Xbox 360, so you're right that I do at least have the option to stream through there if I wanted since it can network with a windows media center PC etc.

I really just need to find a way to sell a bunch of DVDs, even for just a couple bucks. I'd say easily 75% of the 300+ DVDs haven't been watched in 5 years or more. Maybe an even bigger %. Some have never been watched as it was something I saw in the theater and liked and bought the DVD, but have never watched it since.

So that's part of my hesitance to rip them--I'm still probably rarely going to watch most of them anyway. I just don't have the time and I'd rather spend free time watching a movie for the first time most of the time, vs. rewatching something.

But the collector in me hates to part with a lot of them, not to mention how much it sucks to think about all the money spent on them vs. what I could get out of them selling them. :(

One of those many "wish I knew then what I know now" things in life so I wouldn't have bought so many through college and grad school when I had more time to watch them!

Shaggy
04-22-2010, 03:35 PM
I still wouldn't put it under never. Some european countries already provide free internet--as do some cities in the US. So the free part can happen.

Doubtful you're going to see zero cost and high quality at the same time though. And "free" is probably misleading in those cases. I'd bet taxes are paying for it.


Almost never being down simply requires having a complex system of back ups in place.

It's more difficult than it sounds, and it's expensive. Somebody is going to have to pay for it. Companies aren't going to put in high availability, high speed infrastructure and then give it away.

The electric utility industry is over 100 years old now. I'm still waiting for free electricity without power outages.


So to some regard there's a limit on how big media files can get.


Don't bet on it. I'm sure after 3D becomes the norm they'll come up with some other wiz-bang feature to drive new sales. I'm sure at one point people thought that B&W silent movies were the height of technology and couldn't imagine anything better. Remember the infamous "640K is plenty of memory" quote from MS?


Too huge areas where the human race is doing a pathetic job at innovation is speed of data communications and the global infrastructure for it. And battery technology (or alternate power sources for portable devices).

Is it that we're pathetic at innovation, or that every time we innovate the target moves farther away?

Shaggy
04-22-2010, 03:40 PM
I mentioned above that I'm in a condo and thus don't have much closet space and no attic or basement. And it would be stupid to pay for a storage unit etc.

Get rid of the cases and just keep the discs. You can get a "cake box" that'll hold 100 DVDs and hardly take up any room.


But the time/patience issue would keep me from doing it anyway even if I had a house.

I'm just saying it would probably take a lot less time/patience than you think.

dmaul1114
04-22-2010, 03:51 PM
Get rid of the cases and just keep the discs. You can get a "cake box" that'll hold 100 DVDs and hardly take up any room.

I thought about that for sure. Just so hard to find stuff. You can alphabetize, but hard to put new movies you buy in the proper place etc.

But I may go that way--and probably would do that if I ever do digitize the collection.


I'm just saying it would probably take a lot less time/patience than you think.

I know it's not something that would take like a week of full time labor or anything. It's just one of those annoying things to hassle with when you're working and on the go all the time like I am. I just hate spending my free time on anything that's not entertaining!

But sure I could do it. Just do it in between working instead of wasting time with forum posting breaks! :D So maybe I'll get around to it eventually.

dmaul1114
04-22-2010, 03:54 PM
Doubtful you're going to see zero cost and high quality at the same time though. And "free" is probably misleading in those cases. I'd bet taxes are paying for it.


Oh true. I should have been more clear in that it's free in terms of anyone with equipment who lives in the country can access it.

Not that it's truly free, as yes tax money would be behind it for sure, and is in cities and countries with free service.



Is it that we're pathetic at innovation, or that every time we innovate the target moves farther away?

A combination of the two for sure. But at the same time, laptops haven't advanced much the past few years in terms of what they can do, and battery life hasn't gotten much better.

Battery life is the biggest tech limitation we have right now IMO. And I don't think that will get better, it will be widespread wireless electricity etc. that ends up moving portable technology forward, rather than some breakthrough in battery tech IMO.

CyGuy
04-22-2010, 03:57 PM
Battery life is the biggest tech limitation we have right now IMO. And I don't think that will get better, it will be widespread wireless electricity etc. that ends up moving portable technology forward, rather than some breakthrough in battery tech IMO.

I think power consumption and processor efficiency will help though, as well as small but steady improvements in battery technology.

dmaul1114
04-22-2010, 04:05 PM
Those can help. But the problem there is that's hampered by Shaggy's point. We keep needing more power and more speed in processors to drive more complex programs, HD video, next gen 3D graphics etc. so there's only so much that can be done to cut power consumption etc.

As he points out, it's hard for tech to stay ahead of the curve.

DawnFalcon
04-22-2010, 05:12 PM
But if in 50 years there's blazing fast wireless internet freely available worldwide that pretty much never has outages etc....then I could go for it.

Still won't matter. File formats etc. will grow in size (with 3d and so on), and local processing power rises far faster than bandwidth falls in price. This is the golden age for streaming, it'll only get worse in a relative sense for them.

Elfwreck
04-23-2010, 08:01 PM
Battery life is the biggest tech limitation we have right now IMO. And I don't think that will get better, it will be widespread wireless electricity etc. that ends up moving portable technology forward, rather than some breakthrough in battery tech IMO.

Battery life is improving quickly. The problem isn't increases in battery life, it's that every time we get the slightest improvement in power or duration, all the machines shift focus to *use* that power to get the same amount of battery life.

It'd be incredible to put modern batteries in an eBookwise.

Wireless electricity is probably the next major breakthrough--but the utility companies have a vested interest in preventing that. (They didn't like it when Tesla came up with it a hundred years ago; they won't like it any better now.) And the first dozen devices that use wireless electricity will be awful, buggy novelties whose main purpose is just to prove they can do it.

Solar rechargers are probably what's next for most devices--making the the tech that works for calculators cheap enough & powerful enough to power a whole netbook in the sunlight, or allow leaving it out in the sun for a couple of hours to recharge the batteries. That wouldn't require any major breakthroughs; just cheaper components & more efficient energy transfers, and those are always being improved.

dmaul1114
04-23-2010, 11:40 PM
I can't say I'd have all that much interest in solar charges since I never use gadgets outside (nor do spend much time outdoors period), and keep my blinds shut (don't get much direct sun in my windows anyway).

Ralph Sir Edward
04-24-2010, 12:10 AM
My calculators work fine in an artificially lit room. Could there be an e-book reader with a ultra low power screen (E-ink, Liquavista, Mirasol) screen on one side, and a solar charger on the other side of the device, that closes like a book?

But then it would be too durable....

Randolphlalonde
04-24-2010, 03:31 AM
You know, if they actually did manage to get this kind of spyware running, I'd be in some serious trouble.

Not the kind of trouble you think, however.

I have a whole database of eBooks that I never purchased. I own the copyright because I wrote them, but the exact same files have popped up on download sites that are widely used for piracy because someone purchased then shared the books.

Just imagine if some anti-piracy organization added those files to their list because they were spotted on piracy sites. Do any of us actually think that they'd be smart enough to add some kind of differentiation mechanism into their software so my copies weren't wiped out? I didn't buy them, after all.

These people are generally backwards thinking politicians, and the software they develop will only be as smart as the ideas they concoct and the programmers they hire. Those programmers will probably not exceed the mandate of their job either, so we can expect the software to be just as clever* as the politicians and industry suits who commission it.

The incompetence is more frightening than the arm of the law here, I'm thinking...


* I use the term "clever" with deep sarcasm