View Full Version : My letter to Amazon and E-Book Publishers


gabrieldj
04-05-2010, 03:28 PM
Long time lurker, first time poster! :)

I wrote this to Amazon and e-book publishers, via email and twitter (with the letter being posted on my personal site (http://web.mac.com/gabrieldejoy/personal/ebookletter.htm))

I wrote this out of complete frustration with the recent changes in e-book publishing. I don't know what else we can do to convince publishers that they're making the wrong decisions, other than voting with our wallets. I welcome your ideas!

________

First of all, let me preface this by saying that I know much of the Kindle pricing and e-book availability issues are out of Amazonís control. Perhaps this letter and others like it will serve to convince publishers that theyíre making the wrong long-term decisions.

When I first bought my original Kindle, I had been an avid library user. I only bought the books of a few cherished authors, and even then, rarely in hardcover. When I finished with the books, I kept some, but most were passed along to friends and family. After I bought my Kindle, I became a hardcore book buyer. The price point, convenience of reading the book upon release, and the ability to store my entire bookshelf in a small device meant that I went from reading free books at the library to purchasing several books a month from Amazon. This was money that the publishers never would have seen from me otherwise. When I was finished with the books, all I could do was recommend that friends and family buy the books for themselves, as there was no way to give them the books I had read. I accepted this as a perfectly reasonable compromise for the convenience and cost savings of my Amazon e-books.

The recent changes demanded by publishers, however, are not reasonable. My biggest issue is not the price, but the pushed back availability of the e-books. I feel like a fool for having spent hundreds of dollars on my Kindle and Kindle 2. Now, I have to choose between waiting for the book, sometimes months after the hardcover release, getting in line for it at the library, or spending money on a heavy hardcover that I donít want to lug around or have cluttering up my house. To add insult to injury, the price of the e-books is sometimes only a few dollars less than the hardcover retail price. If youíre going to make me pay almost full price, let me have the book immediately! If youíre going to make me wait, at least give me a more significant discount. You are punishing your customers, plan and simple.

I donít know what to do now. Iíve stopped recommending the Kindle, or any e-reader, to friends and family; itís just not a sound investment anymore. I now have a harder decision to make every time a book comes out that I want to read: pay too much and wait for the Kindle edition, wait at the library, or pay for a hardcover. When I wait for the Kindle book, I now press the ďbuy nowĒ button bitterly, remembering that it used to be a no-brainer! If the music industryís struggle against digital media taught us anything, itís that this is not going away! No matter how hard you try to push people towards the inflated profits of your hardcover books, they will find a way to read the content in the format of their choice. You can either make it easy for them to purchase it from you, or you can push them towards illegal means of obtaining it. Your choice.

Iíll once again be visiting the library and reading free books rather than giving you money. Although Iíll enjoy reading the e-books Iíve already purchased, public domain e-books, and reasonably priced e-books from Amazon and other retailers, Iíll no longer be rewarding you for punishing consumers. Publishers need to take a good, hard look at the market and realize that these pathetic, futile attempts to force their consumers to purchase hardcovers rather than e-books will only result in animosity towards publishers, authors who have no say in these matters, and e-reader manufacturers. Again, you are punishing your own customers. You donít have to have an MBA to know thatís just plain stupid.

Angst
04-05-2010, 03:32 PM
There is always the darknet. Unexplored so far, but...

mgm1979
04-05-2010, 04:32 PM
yup - I'll be hooking up with the Denver Public Library to see how their eBook offerings pan out...between them and what's on my "list" - I can surely wait out the "Greedy 5" publishers until they pull their heads out of their @sses.

Barcey
04-05-2010, 05:24 PM
You can always find a group of 10 family and friends with similar tastes in books. Each write down a list of 10 books you'd like to buy, compile a list and remove the duplicates. Take the top 50 books and split up the list and each buy 5. Invest the time to learn how to remove the DRM and share them offline within the group.

You'd be doing what you were previously doing (buying a copying and passing it on).

The publishers aren't behaving ethically, why should you play by their rules?

FizzyWater
04-05-2010, 09:13 PM
You'd be doing what you were previously doing (buying a copying and passing it on).

The publishers aren't behaving ethically, why should you play by their rules?

I'm not sure I think it's unethical to share ebooks with the same reading circle I'd share print ones with (although my reading circle is four or five people, not ten!)

I think it's illegal. I'll grant you that.

But despite the propaganda that I'm supposed to believe an ebook is not just like a book (except when it is), I think I should be able to treat it the same way. I want to be trusted to be only as generous with my ebooks as I ever was with my print books.

I know how many authors and books series I would never have read, but a friend had shoved the book into my grubby hands and said you have to read this now!

Oh well...anyway.

sabredog
04-05-2010, 09:36 PM
In reality, what the introduction of agency pricing and the continuation of geographic restrictions will do is encourage more ereaders to turn to "alternative" sources to acquire ebooks.

Publishers are their own worst enemy when it comes to their outdated business models. Having failed to learn anything from the flailings of the entertainment industry, they have missed a fantastic chance to lead the way. They get no sympathy or credence when bleating about supposed lost sales when these practices continue.

As my youngest son is fond of saying...."Epic fail"

ereaders will still sell, fall in price and continue to increase in popularity, just as MP3 players did 5-10 years ago.

thaigreg
04-05-2010, 10:21 PM
Hi,

I agree with gabrield, but I also feel that they are trying to push us to certain formats (epub) and trying to eliminate others (mobi). We'll probably have to wait a few months and see how things settle down, but if they continue to force us to purchase and read what they want then they're in for a big surprise.

Greg

cfrizz
04-06-2010, 09:52 AM
I don't have a problem with a common format. I waited years to get a universal dvd player that could play both SACDs & DVD-As. I refuse to get caught up in format wars. I refuse to have a piece of equipment that will FORCE me to only buy from one particular vendor.

I want freedom of choice, anything that restricts that for me is going to get left on the shelf.

JSWolf
04-06-2010, 10:01 AM
Hi,

I agree with gabrield, but I also feel that they are trying to push us to certain formats (epub) and trying to eliminate others (mobi). We'll probably have to wait a few months and see how things settle down, but if they continue to force us to purchase and read what they want then they're in for a big surprise.

Greg

One of the big issues with eBooks has been no read standard format. Now that we have one (ePub) you think it's an issue? I think it's a good thing. It means you can buy a book in ePub and use it with many different readers. You have more choices of what reader you want because of this. And because we can now strip the DRM from ePub, if you want Mobipocket format, just buy the ePub, strip the DRM and convert to Mobipocket via Calibre.

Steven Lake
04-06-2010, 10:44 AM
Mainstream publishers are greedy idiots. It's the same issues we've seen with the media industry in general. They first off don't understand the technology, nor do they ever care to. All they see is an opportunity to fleece their customers for insane profits. As the OP pointed out, book reading and purchasing actually went UP when prices were reasonable, and immediately began to tank as soon as prices went up.

Publishers just don't get it. They seem to think that they're being generous by giving you the "privilege" of reading the books they publish, and since ebooks are a digital medium with a "high piracy rate", they justify punishing good, honest readers for the sins of a few, thus justifying (at least in their minds) their fleecing of customers. Of course, the greedy leadership of these companies can't be all that much to blame. In many cases the shareholders equally share that blame.

It's why I went with a smaller publishing house. They know where the buck stops and who provides their bottom line. They care about the author and the reader equally. Yeah, ok, so I don't get the same level of insane nationwide publicity that one of the big houses could provide, and have to do a bunch of the work myself, but I'm finding that I rather like that, and I don't get treated as "just another number" or a "cash cow". I'm a valuable person. When these companies lose site of who it is who actually makes their profits possible (authors and readers alike), they become dead weight that needs to be discarded.

Of course, the trick is finding enough people willing to sacrifice to make something happen these days. Nobody wants to protest (save for small groups like us), nobody wants to go without, to suffer, to experience trouble and worse. The majority seem to want the easy way of life with no problems and no troubles. It's one of the reasons I had so many problems with my tech site. We did a lot of good, but nobody wanted to step up and do anything.

So in that sense, we the readers and authors are somewhat to blame as well. We haven't stepped up to the line and made the big houses take notice and say, "Hey, what we're doing is wrong. If we don't change, we'll lose our shirts." If enough people stepped forward and said something, these problems would be over almost instantly.

Then again, and this is a wild thought out of the blue, it's possible the big houses see ebooks in the same light that the media companies see other digital media. They see it as a wild west world where thieves abound, law and order (aka control over the product) is non-existent, and profits are always in jeopardy. And yet, as the OP pointed out, ebooks actually do more to DRIVE sales and increase profits than their paperback cousins. In fact, as the OP pointed out, they saw a 300% increase in purchases, or better, and instead of sharing the ebook with friends, they recommended them instead, which was also a further 200-500% increase in sales.

So let's do the math. Ebooks are at $5/book. Paperbacks are at $15/book. User one buys one book at $15 but borrows 10. That's $150 in lost sales. User one then goes and switches to ebooks. They now buy all 11 books at $5/book. That's $55 vs $15 in income, and ebooks are almost pure profit!! So if you figure that on a $15, if $6 is the cost of the book, that's $9 remaining. Pay the author 20% (ok, I'm being generous here, as in reality, most big houses only pay 50c a copy in royalties), you now have $6 left. Pay marketing and whatnot for the book, $5. You thus get between 50c and $1 per paperback book. So from user one you've only earned $1 so far, and lost $10. On top of that, they end up sharing their copies with users 2-10, so that's another possible $90 ore more lost, bringing the grand total to about $100 in lost sales.

Now, let's say user one switches to ebooks and buys all 11 books. If you subtract 50% for sales costs to stores, that's $2.50. Remove marketing costs, that's $1/book. You end up with 50c to the author, and $1 in your pocket. Ok, yes, you only made $1, but user one also bought 10 more than before, so where you only made $1 with paperbacks, you just scored $11 with ebooks, and your overhead was nearly zilch. Now, to add a bonus value to that, user one recommends those same books to users 2-10. Suddenly your $11 has turned into (and I'm being realistic on uptake numbers here) $60 in total sales, and maybe even more!! However, as soon as they raise the price to $15/ebook, they return back to the old profit line of $1 per user with limited residuals and referrals, instead of gaining $60 or more in sales they didn't and wouldn't have had before.

But....alas, the big houses can't see this. I mean, come on. I'm not a marketing or economics major, and even *I* can see this. And yet they don't. They're up on the top run and think they know more than we do. And I can understand why. They've been at the top too long and reality has become a bit clouded. I've been on both ends of the spectrum, and have seen the full picture. I was also schooled in business economics by some very brilliant people who knew their stuff and knew how to maximize profits without even trying. And the simple solution was, "Take care of the customer, and your employees, and everything else will take care of itself." And you know what? That has yet to be proven wrong. :)

Steven Lake
04-06-2010, 10:44 AM
lol. Wow, now I know why I'm a novelist. I go on a small diatribe, and end up with a novelette. ;) ^_^;;

mgm1979
04-06-2010, 01:35 PM
You're spot on, Steven...I don't understand why publishers have to try and apply the SAME profit-making model to eBooks as they do with the physical books....EVERYONE knows the overhead associated with distributing eBooks is a FRACTION of the cost of physical books, and saving the electronically typset file as an ePUB/PDF/etc takes no more than a few clicks and the processing time (depending on the length of the book).

I can't help but wonder if the "big houses" implemented this scheme knowing/hoping that if it fails, and pulls their company down with it, that Obama and "Uncle Sam" will be there to hand them their "bailout" like they were a huge automaker or bank....? (silly, I know, but you KNOW some companies have it in the back of their mind...somewhere)

DawnFalcon
04-06-2010, 01:40 PM
lol. Wow, now I know why I'm a novelist. I go on a small diatribe, and end up with a novelette. ;) ^_^;;

Let's also not mention the storage cost of electrons (much lower, and no tax), and the ability to have a permanently available backlist.

gabrieldj
04-06-2010, 04:38 PM
Honestly, the best thing for ebook consumers and, in the long run, publishers and authors, would be if ebook piracy were rampant! In the music industry, the labels were forced to come up with reasonable policies for digital music, because if they didn't, consumers would turn to Napster and Limewire instead.

Unfortunately, not many people read substantially anymore. Of those that do, not that many are interested in ebooks yet. And of those people, not that many are likely to be savvy enough to navigate the darknet for books after finding that the publishers don't want their ebook business. They'll just grow frustrated with their Kindles, Nooks, Sony Readers, etc. and pay for a hardcover on the release date, rather than waiting weeks (or more) and paying nearly the same price for the ebook.

Steven Lake
04-06-2010, 07:21 PM
mgm1979: My thought is this, as I mentioned above. They're either out to kill ebooks (because of the whole wanting control and "we don't wanna change" mentality) or they're getting greedy and see this as a way to increase profits exponentially.

gabrieldj: I'm no supporter of piracy by any means, or any kind of illegal file sharing. It hurts everyone it touches. (PS, Sharing files on limewire, bittorrent, and the like is properly referred to as file sharing, not piracy.) However, I can't deny the benefits it's reaped. On the downside, it's also created a draconian copyright and law system under which even I'm smarting, and I'm an author! I try to provide everything my readers want in the best way I know how, and yet these jack***'s are hell bent on ruining everything for everyone. Even many of the ereader makers (Not everyone, just many of the bigger names.) are doing everything they can to screw over people, and all in the name of profits. It's really pathetic and frustrating IMHO. >.<;;

It's why I published with one of the smaller publishing houses. They actually treat the authors and customers as real humans, and do things realistically. That's something the big houses can't and refuse to do. And personally, I'm sick of it.

GPLarge
04-06-2010, 08:42 PM
Steven, I can't agree with you more. I am no marketing wiz, just a humble consumer. Even I can see the profit they will be making off higher prices. I think, if the publishers are smart about it, They will bring the prices down til they find the "sweet spot" where consumers will buy their product more and they are happy with the return they get. The large increase will only drive more folks to free or pirated copies and they will lose money in the end.

ozron
04-06-2010, 11:05 PM
It's why I published with one of the smaller publishing houses. They actually treat the authors and customers as real humans, and do things realistically. That's something the big houses can't and refuse to do. And personally, I'm sick of it.

Steven, I hadn't heard of you before and checked out your website. I'm very interested in reading some of your books. However they don't appear to be distributed here in Australia (one problem with a small publisher I guess), so ebooks would be a great alternative. Unfortunately you don't seem to have any of your titles available in ebook format. Have you considered using an independent supplier like Smashwords? Seriously, I'd purchase several of your books from them now if they were reasonably priced (say US$5 - $6).

ozron
04-06-2010, 11:16 PM
Was going to add this to my previous post, but the site won't let me edit the post...

I also agree with you Steven and the OP. Personally I will stop buying ebooks from the major sites in protest at the publishers actions. I'll probably end up purchasing more ebooks from sites like Smashwords and unknown indie authors, who in many cases, are just as good or even better than many well known authors. We'll also go back to borrowing from the local libraries again.

The big publishers (and their authors) are going to lose out again, thanks to their blind stupidity. They simply don't get it, and I don't know what it will take for them to get it. :(

sabredog
04-07-2010, 12:52 AM
Honestly, the best thing for ebook consumers and, in the long run, publishers and authors, would be if ebook piracy were rampant! In the music industry, the labels were forced to come up with reasonable policies for digital music, because if they didn't, consumers would turn to Napster and Limewire instead.

I believe that is what is going to occur, regardless of the far smaller numbers of dedicated bookworms compared to audiophiles.

sabredog
04-07-2010, 01:00 AM
Steven, I hadn't heard of you before and checked out your website. I'm very interested in reading some of your books. However they don't appear to be distributed here in Australia (one problem with a small publisher I guess), so ebooks would be a great alternative. Unfortunately you don't seem to have any of your titles available in ebook format. Have you considered using an independent supplier like Smashwords? Seriously, I'd purchase several of your books from them now if they were reasonably priced (say US$5 - $6).

Ditto here, your novels look very interesting!

raac
04-07-2010, 09:14 PM
I wrote to Amazon for a similar reason, but they just replied with some empty BS. I therefore sent the following letter to the publisher (I think if we all were to do this, it may slowly have an impact):



I was thinking of buying "Why Does E=mc2?" as an e-book. On Amazon, one of the cheapest sites in the internet, the Kindle edition is $2 cheaper than the hardback but almost $4 more than the paperback.

I would like to buy the e-book but cannot bring myself to pay more than the paperback. E-books are worth less to me because they have no re-sale value and I can't lend them to friends. They should be priced accordingly. Since I do not want to fill my shelves further, I will be borrowing the book from a library instead. You have lost a sale. Continuing to over-price e-books will only serve to increase piracy.

EowynCarter
04-08-2010, 05:16 AM
I'll wait to see what really happens before making judgement.
For now, the only consequence I've seen is some book disappearing from BoB.

kennyc
04-08-2010, 06:33 AM
yup - I'll be hooking up with the Denver Public Library to see how their eBook offerings pan out...between them and what's on my "list" - I can surely wait out the "Greedy 5" publishers until they pull their heads out of their @sses.

The DPL is getting better daily. I signed up for the e-book access in the Fall and almost immediately was able to read the new Doctorow Homer and Langley and Atwood - The Year of the Flood. :)

Logseman
04-08-2010, 07:10 AM
Of course, the trick is finding enough people willing to sacrifice to make something happen these days. Nobody wants to protest (save for small groups like us), nobody wants to go without, to suffer, to experience trouble and worse. The majority seem to want the easy way of life with no problems and no troubles. It's one of the reasons I had so many problems with my tech site. We did a lot of good, but nobody wanted to step up and do anything.

So in that sense, we the readers and authors are somewhat to blame as well. We haven't stepped up to the line and made the big houses take notice and say, "Hey, what we're doing is wrong. If we don't change, we'll lose our shirts." If enough people stepped forward and said something, these problems would be over almost instantly.
So the scores of uploaders who feed the darknet with content are not doing anything? Does that not count as a protest, as a way to circumvent the ugly statu quo? Are they, risking being ransomed or kidnapped on custody of their nation-states, doing not a bold and courageous action? The fact that one does not like their form of peaceful protest doesn't deny its status as such.

And why must we, book readers, resort to the hard ways if there are easier ones to get what we want? It's only human behavior to want to simplify and make things as easy as possible. That's why someone observed a circular stone and understood what could be a wheel.

Steven Lake
04-08-2010, 12:33 PM
Ozron, we're working on having ebooks for sale. It's just taking longer than I expected. I do have some free copies that I was gonna share here for you guys to read and enjoy. I just have to figure out how to post them to the archive. Dreams was kind enough to build them for me. :) The only thing I ask for those who read the free versions is, if you like them, leave a donation in the tip jar on my site as your way of saying thanks. The amount is up to you based on what value you feel the book had to you. :)

Oh, and btw, if you guys want print copies, I'm selling those directly off my website (they're in stores here in the states, and will be available internationally soon, but we're still waiting for Ingram to filter them through the system). Ebooks will be available soon for sale too from several sources, but aren't there yet. I'm still working on that.

ozron
04-10-2010, 10:38 AM
Ozron, we're working on having ebooks for sale. It's just taking longer than I expected. I do have some free copies that I was gonna share here for you guys to read and enjoy. I just have to figure out how to post them to the archive. Dreams was kind enough to build them for me. :) The only thing I ask for those who read the free versions is, if you like them, leave a donation in the tip jar on my site as your way of saying thanks. The amount is up to you based on what value you feel the book had to you. :)

Oh, and btw, if you guys want print copies, I'm selling those directly off my website (they're in stores here in the states, and will be available internationally soon, but we're still waiting for Ingram to filter them through the system). Ebooks will be available soon for sale too from several sources, but aren't there yet. I'm still working on that.

That's great news Steve. I realise you're selling print copies off your website, but I imagine that postage down to Australia will be prohibitive. More than happy to leave a reasonable donation for your "freebies" and very much looking to your ebooks coming out soon. Do let us know when they're out. Thanks!

sabredog
04-11-2010, 05:31 AM
Good news indeed. I am looking forward to the ebooks!

Cheers and thanks again

Mike

Kali Yuga
04-11-2010, 11:15 AM
I'm happy to tell you that your perception is incorrect. ;)

At least one major publisher that is forcing the agency model (Macmillan) plans to release ebooks simultaneously with the initial paper publication. The situation is actually getting better rather than getting worse.


[quote=gabrieldj]Now, I have to choose between waiting for the book, sometimes months after the hardcover release, getting in line for it at the library, or spending money on a heavy hardcover that I donít want to lug around or have cluttering up my house.
Not really. In fact, the big 5 publishers no longer need to delay the release of ebooks ("windowing"), since they can set the price of the ebooks.

Things are still changing a bit, but I'd say in a month or two windowing will be a fading memory rather than an economic reality.


To add insult to injury, the price of the e-books is sometimes only a few dollars less than the hardcover retail price.
Sure, if you ignore the shipping & handling costs.

The paper costs are actually close to only 15% or so of the book. New ebooks are also generally hitting $10-15, whereas the "hardcover retail price" is actually more like $25 or $30. So the prices are actually a bit more in line than you probably think.


I donít know what to do now.
Man up? :D

Seriously, it's not that big of a deal. Availability of books in general, let alone new books, was actually much worse a year or so. There are plenty of ebooks -- including new publications -- at the $10 price point. So take it easy; if you like an ebook and it's a bit too expensive, just add it to your wish list and wait for the cost to go down.

ATimson
04-12-2010, 10:08 AM
The paper costs are actually close to only 15% or so of the book. New ebooks are also generally hitting $10-15, whereas the "hardcover retail price" is actually more like $25 or $30. So the prices are actually a bit more in line than you probably think.
If it's in that $10 range, sure. For a $25 book, a 15% paper cost is $3.75. So if your number is right I shouldn't be seeing that ebook for more than $12.75.

(I can get the print version for no more than $16.50 at Amazon - possibly less, if it's a Stephen King-class book - minus the inapplicable $3.75 for physical production. Yes, there's server costs, but there's also no shipping; that balances out in the publisher's/retailer's favor.)

Well, at least S&S seems to be reasonably pricing their ebooks of hardcover books - $11.99 for the ebook of a $25 hardcover that came out last Tuesday. Now if only they'd bother to do the same for paperbacks. Or have the book I want listed at Kobo. ;)

Steven Lake
04-16-2010, 07:17 PM
That's great news Steve. I realise you're selling print copies off your website, but I imagine that postage down to Australia will be prohibitive. More than happy to leave a reasonable donation for your "freebies" and very much looking to your ebooks coming out soon. Do let us know when they're out. Thanks!
A free copy of "The Oort Perimeter" is available here, and will also be available on the Astak ebook site as well. I'll also be offering books 2 and 3 of the series, plus book 1 of my anthology over there as well.

sabredog
04-17-2010, 10:04 AM
Is the Astak store tied to that device ala Kindle?

speakingtohe
04-19-2010, 03:55 AM
But....alas, the big houses can't see this. I mean, come on. I'm not a marketing or economics major, and even *I* can see this. And yet they don't. They're up on the top run and think they know more than we do. And I can understand why. They've been at the top too long and reality has become a bit clouded. I've been on both ends of the spectrum, and have seen the full picture. I was also schooled in business economics by some very brilliant people who knew their stuff and knew how to maximize profits without even trying. And the simple solution was, "Take care of the customer, and your employees, and everything else will take care of itself." And you know what? That has yet to be proven wrong.

Of course they can see it. They are not idiots. They also see a short term opportunity for big profits and in a way who can blame them. It is a capitalistic system after all.
Still it is unethical IMO for the publisher to charge the same price as they would for printed material and not give the author a bigger piece of the pie.

I'm not sure I think it's unethical to share ebooks with the same reading circle I'd share print ones with (although my reading circle is four or five people, not ten!)

I don't see it as anymore unethical/illegal for you to lend a copy of your ebook to a friend than for the library to do it.

Copyright protection started mainly for books to protect the author. It seems to have evolved to a point where the author gets the least protection (profit).


Unlike the film and music industries, book authors can produce on their own. Granted the publicity and copyreading supplied by the publisher is of value, but how much.
When enough authors retain digital rights to their works we will see a major change in the sysytem.
When enough authors wake up to the fact that they can exist without pulishers, but that publishers cannot exist without authors it will be a brave new world.

Moral considerations aside, the only reason to pay money for a book (I am suggesting nothing illegal here as you can borrow from a library quite legally) is to keep the authors writing and to reward them for providing you with information and/or pleasure.

Konilu
04-19-2010, 05:01 AM
Gabrieldj: I just sent this query to Waterstone's before I joined this group and read your eloquent letter:

"I received your email of recommended ebooks, and clicked on the Orange Prize Longlist. I was getting ready to put the ďWolf HallĒ ebook in my shopping basket at £4.59, only to realise that this was the paperback version, and the electronic version was actually more expensive (£5.92)! How can this be?? No printing costs, no distribution, no delivery, no physical storage Ė why would you ever charge more for the electronic version than the print version?

Whatís going on? How can you possibly defend this pricing? I buy lots of ebooks, but it wonít be from Waterstoneís if this is how you treat your ebook customers. Please tell me itís a typoÖ.."

Elfwreck
04-20-2010, 05:52 PM
Is the Astak store tied to that device ala Kindle?

No, it's not. The Astak store uses use Adobe Digital Editions (http://wiki.mobileread.com/wiki/Adobe_Digital_Editions) (ADE) for DRM, for both PDF and ePub ebooks. They can be read on any ADE device: PCs, Macs (I think), Sony Reade, the Nook, Cybook, Cool-ER, iRexes, BeBook, and a few others.

sabredog
04-20-2010, 09:19 PM
Excellent.

Thanks for the heads up!