View Full Version : Library books


jduvall
03-31-2010, 05:33 PM
I hope this is the right place.

Lately I've been surfing my library's 'ebooks' and I am very disappointed.

It seems like most of the books are either project gut. or are all non-fiction. From what I understand librarys like the new york public have HUGE fiction ebook selections, so is it just my library is behind the times (Fort worth public)

Edit: They do how ever have a goodish selection of audio books if you are into that

Ravensknight
03-31-2010, 05:35 PM
my library has nothing but audio and some tech manuals for things I've never even heard of. I need to speak "sternly" to them about it :-D

TallMomof2
03-31-2010, 05:37 PM
Well, my library has mostly fiction and audio books. The non-fiction selection is poor. I believe that each library system can choose what type of ebooks to lend. It's most likely a matter of cost and local demand.

jduvall
03-31-2010, 05:47 PM
Maybe if I went and bugged them each and every day we could get some fiction in there haha

ficbot
03-31-2010, 06:25 PM
My library has an okay-sized collection but a lot of the fiction is romance and vampire stuff, followed by mysteries. Not a lot of general fiction.

Sydney's Mom
03-31-2010, 07:31 PM
Chicago Public Library has mostly romance and general fiction. Only popular nonfiction.

HorridRedDog
03-31-2010, 09:16 PM
My loacl library isn't much better but here is a solution of sorts.

INFO
The Free Philadelphia Library (http://www.library.phila.gov/) -- Available to city residents (free), anyone 65 or older (free), residents anywhere in PA with "Access Pennsylvania" library cards (free), and non-residents ($15) Online Registration (http://libwww.freelibrary.org/register/getcard1.cfm)

DOWNLOADS: audio books, e-books, music, movies, plus. Downloads (http://libwww.library.phila.gov/explore/ElecResExplore.cfm?topicTitle=efreelibrary) Download Sampler (http://freelibrary.lib.overdrive.com/20984817-09ED-4C93-8CF7-FDE2D9F84A68/10/354/en/Default.htm)

Currently I am listening to "Master and Commander (http://freelibrary.lib.overdrive.com/20984817-09ED-4C93-8CF7-FDE2D9F84A68/10/354/en/ContentDetails.htm?ID=74D1567F-DDE7-4928-9006-23D39CE02248)" by Patrick O'Brian.

I transfer the audiobooks to a Sansa Clip Plus using Overdrive (the lending mechanism the most, if not all, use. They will tell you that you have 10 days to listen. But once it is on a "dumb" mp3 player "it just don't know". Listen as long as it takes.

I have a double ended cord that I plug into my mp3 headphone jack, and then into the car sterio system. I do a fair (sometimes a lot) amount of driving.

P.S. - Online registration was VERY simple (but then again, I'm in PA). I got my card over the weekend, and started downloading.

Even if you can't get it free, $15 is VERY cheap to get the thousands of dowloads that are available.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Library ebook downloads to a Kindle can be a problem.

But there is good news for audiobook downloads to Kindle.

It takes a bit of looking, but I found this:

Can I transfer Adobe eBooks to an Amazon® Kindle? (http://freelibrary.lib.overdrive.com/2B76C3C8-2500-4A8C-9776-73B7A437DC45/10/354/en/Help-FAQ-Format410.htm)

No. The Amazon Kindle does not currently support eBooks protected with Adobe DRM.

To get it in the Kindle would take a bit of jumping through hoops. Download and de-DRM the book, before you can read it.

Now if you want to read books on the computer it's no problem, just not simple on the Kindle.

On the other hand - If you want to download audiobooks and put them into a mp3 player or on the Kindle - Using My Kindle as an MP3 Player (http://heartofwisdom.com/blog/using-my-kindle-as-an-mp3-player/)

"But then I learned the secret. If I upload my MP3 into the Audible folder I have the option to fast forward, pause, rewind, etc. just like on an MP3 player. Yooo Hooo!"

And ofcourse you can download movies, music, etc.

Ravensknight
03-31-2010, 10:25 PM
DOWNLOADS: audio books, e-books, music, movies, plus.

my question would be, what kind of selection for scifi/fantasy do they have? Is there a way to check before paying the out of state fee? I'd certainly pay 15 if they had a decent selection in that genre...

Marcy
03-31-2010, 10:45 PM
The Philadelphia Free Library has very little sci-fi. They have a great selection of mainstream fiction however. I feel it was a $15 well spent, since my local library only has audiobooks and a few crap ebooks.

If you are into sci-fi/fantasy you really can't beat Baen. It is by far my favorite ebook store. Cheap and DRM-free, what more can you ask?

-Marcy

HorridRedDog
03-31-2010, 11:16 PM
The Philadelphia Free Library has very little sci-fi. They have a great selection of mainstream fiction however. I feel it was a $15 well spent, since my local library only has audiobooks and a few crap ebooks.

If you are into sci-fi/fantasy you really can't beat Baen. It is by far my favorite ebook store. Cheap and DRM-free, what more can you ask?

-Marcy

I'm afraid that this is too true

From time to time I do a lot of driving. So I download a lot of audiobooks from the Philadelphia library. Then too, my dog likes audiobooks because we take longer walks. :D

But is you want Sci-Fi she is 100% correct, again, on Bean Books (http://www.baen.com/).

Want FREE!!!

Baen Free Library (http://www.baen.com/library/defaultTitles.htm)

addicted2books
04-01-2010, 12:38 AM
Our local library has just recently started offering ebooks and downloadable audiobooks. So currently the number of ebooks and audiobooks to be downloaded is small.

I sent off an email to the main branch of our library just to let them know what a great service this was and I was looking forward to the development of the Overdrive Program. I immediately received an email back....everyone, from the developers of the program to the Chief Librarian were thrilled to have some feedback. I was asked all kinds of questions, from how I read my ebooks, what types of formats I preferred as well as the type of content I favored.

Maybe if you let your library know what you're looking for, this might be a deciding factor in the the type of content they will be purchasing in the future. It certainly can't hurt to let your library know what you would like to see available in their catalog. :bookworm:

ficbot
04-01-2010, 12:42 AM
Lori, I found that too. Whenever I go to the actual library, I mention how I am enjoying the books. They buy content that they think will have a good demand, so having them hear that people want it really does help.

Kevin2960
04-01-2010, 07:17 AM
Well Folks feel for us here in the UK .... As far as I know there are just 4 Library's in the whole of the UK that loan eBooks .... YES 4 ....

I believe that is to improve but I'm sure not holding my Breath

Not sure what they stock by way of eBooks

Graham
04-01-2010, 07:46 AM
Well Folks feel for us here in the UK .... As far as I know there are just 4 Library's in the whole of the UK that loan eBooks .... YES 4 ....

I believe that is to improve but I'm sure not holding my Breath

Not sure what they stock by way of eBooks

I wrote to the council here in North Yorkshire recently, and they're going to launch an ebook service soon. They hope to be up and running by early May.

:)

Graham

joobies
04-01-2010, 09:50 AM
Positive feedback is always welcome at the library. Our overdrive system is grouped with 49 other libraries which makes the selection a bit out of my library's control.
So, while we have mostly audiobooks there are still enough other selections to keep me busy. It is a great system that I trust will catch on with use.

Many thanks to HorridRedDog for the information about the Free Philadelphia library.... my application is enroute.

batgirl
04-01-2010, 11:14 AM
I can't second enough addicted2books. This is a relatively new service for libraries and an expensive one at that. We need to know that (1) patrons are using the service or want to use the service and (2) what types of books that these patrons want to read.

Please be advised that Macmillan and Simon & Schuster refuse to sell ebooks to libraries so none of their titles will be available in Overdrive. Also, we have to pay a significant amount more money for each ebook title we purchase to lend out. While everyone is arguing about REP, libraries have been getting NO DISCOUNT AT ALL on ebooks. We pay the SRP of the least expensive pBook available. If the title is only available as a hardcover at 27.99, we pay 27.99 to add it to our collection. This differs vastly from our purchase of pBooks and in the days of dwindling budgets we can get much more bang for our buck buying pBooks. Because creating a digital library is expensive, small libraries are grouping together to offer content.

So, please, if you are using library ebooks or would like to but don't like the titles available please, please let your library know (nicely). You can/should even suggest titles you want purchased (for ebooks or pbooks). We always appreciate suggestions. You can also let your mayor and local council know as well because most library funding is local!

gastan
04-01-2010, 11:40 AM
My suburb of Portland, OR (USA) has no ebooks. None. Zip. Nada. When I went in to ask about ebooks I talked to 3 different people and each one of them proudly informed me that they had a nice collection of audio books. When I explained that ebooks were different than audio books each of them looked at me like I was crazy. They had no idea what I was talking about.

While I live only 30 miles from Portland, OR, I am in a different county and not eligible for a free or discounted library card from them. I don't know if it would matter. The last time I checked them on-line, they had less than two hundred ebooks listed and it seemed that very few of them were fiction. However, if you are interested in "iPod: The Missing Manual" or "In-N-Out Burger: A Behind-the-counter Look at the Fast-food Chain That Breaks All the Rules", or similar subjects, they have you well covered.

abookreader
04-01-2010, 11:53 AM
That Philly link is very tempting. I already have cards for our local system and the Chicago System but I see several books there that aren't available to either.

I have to think our library can tell how much the patrons are enjoying the downloadable ebooks. When I first started getting books off of Overdrive there were hardy any waitlists. Now they build like crazy as soon as the books are added.

I realize that the Overdrive book licenses are expensive but I'm unclear as to how exactly it works. I mean, once a library purchases a title do they own that license forever or just a set period?

I mean, sure a book might cost $27.99 but it also isn't going to wear out after 12 patrons read the book.

batgirl
04-01-2010, 01:05 PM
I mean, sure a book might cost $27.99 but it also isn't going to wear out after 12 patrons read the book.

It is a rare book that wears out after 12 circulations. Someone is out sick today and I'm sending out interlibrary loan requests. Thought I'd check circulation on a couple of popular titles. I have one book that has been checked out 31 times and is still in very good shape. Another 24 times also in very good shape.

I can buy close to 2 pbooks for the price of one ebook. That eats into my budget pretty fast. But as demand for ebooks grows the money will shift. I'm here to provide to my community what (and how) they want to read. So, again, I stress that we need to know. Call your library and ask for the person who buys the books or if you already have a downloadable lending library ask to speak to the person in charge. Please also remember we are dealing with limited funds. Libraries have taken a big hit in budgets during this downturn. And once again libraries and (some) publishers are in conflict over ebook lending.

As for how Overdrive library licenses work, we do own it as long as we continue to lend it through the Overdrive framework. Right now there is no competition so that isn't a problem.

HorridRedDog
04-01-2010, 08:41 PM
Positive feedback is always welcome at the library. Our overdrive system is grouped with 49 other libraries which makes the selection a bit out of my library's control.
So, while we have mostly audiobooks there are still enough other selections to keep me busy. It is a great system that I trust will catch on with use.

Many thanks to HorridRedDog for the information about the Free Philadelphia library.... my application is enroute.

Thank you. I hope that you enjoy the free P library.

One of the things that I like about them is that as soon as you get your card you can start downloading ebooks, audiobooks, and movies.

Some of the other libraries, like those in the Pittsburgh area, make you come in to "activate" the card. One library that lets out of area users have access to downloads charge $185 PER YEAR!

Don't give up on using their "system". Searching for authors or by genre can get frustrating.

If you want "horror" you can't use that term (I guess that it is a bad word).

Type in only the last name of the author or the title of a book in their system, and then follow the links.

Such as Koontz or "Prodigal Son".

But if you type in just Prodigal Son without the quotes you will get a lot of junk.

If any one can find a better ebook selection let us know:)

Rich_D
04-02-2010, 02:12 PM
The Carnegie library in Pittsburgh offers both Audio and ebooks, but the ebooks can only be read on a PC. I don't think they can be downloaded to an ereader. The audiobooks can, but not the ebooks.

Xenophon
04-02-2010, 03:31 PM
The Carnegie library in Pittsburgh offers both Audio and ebooks, but the ebooks can only be read on a PC. I don't think they can be downloaded to an ereader. The audiobooks can, but not the ebooks.
Quite right. That's why I got a Free Library of Philadelphia card... for free! The Philly library does Overdrive eBooks, which can be downloaded to your reader.

Xenophon
(in Pgh)

Rich_D
04-02-2010, 04:24 PM
Quite right. That's why I got a Free Library of Philadelphia card... for free! The Philly library does Overdrive eBooks, which can be downloaded to your reader.

Xenophon
(in Pgh)

I've sent for one as well! :thumbsup:

SensualPoet
04-02-2010, 09:53 PM
The Toronto Public Library uses the Overdrive system which means I can't use a Kindle 2. It's one reason I am toying with buying a Kobo when it's released next month.

But the selection is so slight ... I am biting my tongue not to type something vitriolic.

Libraries -- and certainly this was the Carnegie vision -- are intended to be knowledge portals where accessibility is a fundamental principle. Why on earth do not major libraries have "e-book librarians" who are curating a growing collection of titles for patrons to select from? Why isn't there a "manybooks.net" department finding the best of public domain and showcasing it "on e-shelves" for patrons to browse and borrow?

I'm astounded to discover that "e-books" is lumped in with audio books and mp3 files for borrowing once I enter the Overdrive world. I'd expect to be able to read a copy of "The Murder of Roger Ackroyd" and, in fact, I cant: but I can listen to it. How nuts is that?

pilotbob
04-03-2010, 01:24 AM
The Toronto Public Library uses the Overdrive system which means I can't use a Kindle 2. It's one reason I am toying with buying a Kobo when it's released next month.

Yep... I Was thinking for $150.... I might get one... "I would say it was for my Wife"... but it would be something I could put library eBooks on without the liberation hassle.

BOb

Rich_D
04-03-2010, 10:50 AM
The Toronto Public Library uses the Overdrive system which means I can't use a Kindle 2. It's one reason I am toying with buying a Kobo when it's released next month.

But the selection is so slight ... I am biting my tongue not to type something vitriolic.

Libraries -- and certainly this was the Carnegie vision -- are intended to be knowledge portals where accessibility is a fundamental principle. Why on earth do not major libraries have "e-book librarians" who are curating a growing collection of titles for patrons to select from? Why isn't there a "manybooks.net" department finding the best of public domain and showcasing it "on e-shelves" for patrons to browse and borrow?

I'm astounded to discover that "e-books" is lumped in with audio books and mp3 files for borrowing once I enter the Overdrive world. I'd expect to be able to read a copy of "The Murder of Roger Ackroyd" and, in fact, I cant: but I can listen to it. How nuts is that?

Carnegie also uses Overdrive. Libraries have to pay for an additional license to allow downloads by members. But I know most libraries including Carnegie are having budget issues, so I doubt an e-license is high on their list of priorities.

DJHARKAVY
04-03-2010, 12:48 PM
I don't know if they still do, but when I lived in Brooklyn and the BPL did not carry ebooks, I emailed the NYPL and they sent me a card to use for online downloads.

SensualPoet
04-03-2010, 10:39 PM
Carnegie also uses Overdrive. Libraries have to pay for an additional license to allow downloads by members. But I know most libraries including Carnegie are having budget issues, so I doubt an e-license is high on their list of priorities.

With respect, you entirely missed my point. Andrew Carnegie was responsible for the building of over 3500 libraries around the world by 1919 -- nearly 1700 in the US, 125 in Canada, 660 in Britain and Ireland, and others elsewhere. The first was in his beloved hometown in Scotland. He believed in local communities directly participating in projects, ongoing funding and that information (lending/access) would be free.

E-book lending opens a new category of access and re-enfranchises, potentially, a new generation of borrowers who are electronically engaged and not likely to need, or seek out, paper. It just seems to me libraries today could do a significantly better job in this area, at relatively little cost and by pooling resources of regional library facilities.

Rich_D
04-04-2010, 12:12 AM
With respect, you entirely missed my point. Andrew Carnegie was responsible for the building of over 3500 libraries around the world by 1919 -- nearly 1700 in the US, 125 in Canada, 660 in Britain and Ireland, and others elsewhere. The first was in his beloved hometown in Scotland. He believed in local communities directly participating in projects, ongoing funding and that information (lending/access) would be free.

E-book lending opens a new category of access and re-enfranchises, potentially, a new generation of borrowers who are electronically engaged and not likely to need, or seek out, paper. It just seems to me libraries today could do a significantly better job in this area, at relatively little cost and by pooling resources of regional library facilities.

I understood your point, I just wasn't commenting on that portion of it. ;)

Currently Carnegie Libraries in Pittsburgh are in the midst of closing 4 branches due to budgetary issues. Licensing for e-books is, I imagine, pretty low on the list of priorities.

I also think that it wouldn't be money well spent. Let's face it, e-readers are luxury items and currently libraries are most important to the poorer communities. In some cases the only place kids can use a computer or read a book, other than at school, is the library. If the library has to choose between an e-book and a p-book, they need to go with the p-book because that will be the greater benefit to the most people and that is more in line with Carnegie's vision.

SensualPoet
04-04-2010, 10:23 AM
Let's face it, e-readers are luxury items and currently libraries are most important to the poorer communities. In some cases the only place kids can use a computer or read a book, other than at school, is the library. If the library has to choose between an e-book and a p-book, they need to go with the p-book because that will be the greater benefit to the most people and that is more in line with Carnegie's vision.

Yes, I agree with your assessment here -- the library's role as a community centre. I disagree (without a shred of proof on my part ;)) that the cost of expanding the e-book collection, shared with other regional libraries, and properly curated and promoted, would not be a net benefit to the library's local role.

I was really pleased to see that the Free Library of Philadelphia included, on its home page, info about PA genealogy. That's the sort of focussed, local relevance I'd expect from "curating" info that could be applied to e-books.

Our Toronto Public Library system has some amazing sub collections -- the most extensive Conan Doyle collection in the world, the Judith Merrill SciFi collection, the Osborne Collection of Early Children's Books and tons of material directly related to the history of Toronto, Ontario and Canada. Why not a focus on Canadian writers, current and extinct, where e-books exist? There are endless possibilities and they all enhance what the library system can deliver and increase its reputation.

*sigh* e-books seem such an obvious enhancement to me even within existing budgets.

asjogren
04-04-2010, 02:51 PM
I believe eBooks are a natural for Public Libraries.

- eBooks are never lost
- eBooks are never late
- there are no transportation costs between branches
- eBooks are never damaged or defaced or wear out
- eBooks don't get misfiled
- eBooks don't take up room in space limited branches
- less popular books can remain in the library as eBooks at little cost
- eBooks don't need to be inventoried
- with constrained branch hours - the eBook library remains open

DJHARKAVY
04-04-2010, 04:52 PM
I believe eBooks are a natural for Public Libraries.

- eBooks are never lost
- eBooks are never late
- there are no transportation costs between branches
- eBooks are never damaged or defaced or wear out
- eBooks don't get misfiled
- eBooks don't take up room in space limited branches
- less popular books can remain in the library as eBooks at little cost
- eBooks don't need to be inventoried
- with constrained branch hours - the eBook library remains open

ebooks are always returned on time.

On the flip side, you can't get late fees for them...

Rich_D
04-04-2010, 08:20 PM
I believe eBooks are a natural for Public Libraries.

- eBooks are never lost
- eBooks are never late
- there are no transportation costs between branches
- eBooks are never damaged or defaced or wear out
- eBooks don't get misfiled
- eBooks don't take up room in space limited branches
- less popular books can remain in the library as eBooks at little cost
- eBooks don't need to be inventoried
- with constrained branch hours - the eBook library remains open

While I agree with this, eBooks won't really become mainstream until you can get a $20 eReader.

pilotbob
04-04-2010, 08:48 PM
While I agree with this, eBooks won't really become mainstream until you can get a $20 eReader.

Well... Smart phones are mainstream and most of them are quite a bit more than $20.

I don't even think books are currently main stream... are they? Isn't there only a small percentage of people that read books on a regular basis?

BOb

Rich_D
04-04-2010, 10:09 PM
Well... Smart phones are mainstream and most of them are quite a bit more than $20.

I don't even think books are currently main stream... are they? Isn't there only a small percentage of people that read books on a regular basis?

BOb

Smart phones are multi-taskers and are about status; most e-readers aren't. Harry Potter and Twilight started a whole generation of readers. Given the choice, I'd bet most of them would choose an i-Phone over a Kindle.

Flood the market with inexpensive e-readers and e-books would take off. You'd have schools utilizing them, libraries offering greater selections and lower prices on books.

Personally, I'll never buy a smart phone. I wouldn't even have a cell phone if my wife didn't insist on it for emergencies. I love my pda though! But Palm has abandoned me, so my next step is a Nook.

DJHARKAVY
04-04-2010, 10:25 PM
Smart phones are multi-taskers and are about status; most e-readers aren't. Harry Potter and Twilight started a whole generation of readers. Given the choice, I'd bet most of them would choose an i-Phone over a Kindle.

Flood the market with inexpensive e-readers and e-books would take off. You'd have schools utilizing them, libraries offering greater selections and lower prices on books.

Personally, I'll never buy a smart phone. I wouldn't even have a cell phone if my wife didn't insist on it for emergencies. I love my pda though! But Palm has abandoned me, so my next step is a Nook.

My Assistant Principal asked me if I would like to use an eReader for my students. He is still trying to get the funding, but if all goes well, next year, we will be trying it out with a group of our students.

Biggest problems is that most of the textbooks are available in pdf or proprietary formats, and are difficult to translate to small readers.

Rich_D
04-04-2010, 10:43 PM
My Assistant Principal asked me if I would like to use an eReader for my students. He is still trying to get the funding, but if all goes well, next year, we will be trying it out with a group of our students.

Biggest problems is that most of the textbooks are available in pdf or proprietary formats, and are difficult to translate to small readers.

I applaud your school for trying them out. :2thumbsup

Kris777
04-04-2010, 11:07 PM
My Assistant Principal asked me if I would like to use an eReader for my students. He is still trying to get the funding, but if all goes well, next year, we will be trying it out with a group of our students.

Biggest problems is that most of the textbooks are available in pdf or proprietary formats, and are difficult to translate to small readers.

I see that Ectaco sell jetBook-Lite preloaded with School's Reading List (http://www.ectaco.com/jetbook-lite-school-list/)

"This model comes with a digital copy of the school's reading list.
World's classics are now at your fingertips!"

DJHARKAVY
04-05-2010, 12:02 AM
I applaud your school for trying them out. :2thumbsup

IF we end up doing it...

But I can hope...

I see that Ectaco sell jetBook-Lite preloaded with School's Reading List (http://www.ectaco.com/jetbook-lite-school-list/)

"This model comes with a digital copy of the school's reading list.
World's classics are now at your fingertips!"

I can't find a listing of what School's reading list it is or what is contained in it.

gastan
04-05-2010, 11:25 AM
Ectaco says, "World's classics are now at your fingertips!" I bet what they mean is the world's classics of literature. So this would be great for a literature class but useless for a chemistry or history class that required specific texts. Textbooks as opposed to literature books.

Jellby
04-05-2010, 01:31 PM
Ectaco says, "World's classics are now at your fingertips!" I bet what they mean is the world's classics of literature. So this would be great for a literature class but useless for a chemistry or history class that required specific texts. Textbooks as opposed to literature books.

Even other "classics" like Euclid's Elements, or Newton's Principia Mathematica, or the Kama Sutra...

Kris777
04-16-2010, 04:34 PM
IF we end up doing it...

But I can hope...



I can't find a listing of what School's reading list it is or what is contained in it.

I received the e-mail from Pavel (Ectaco support) that jetBook-Lite comes preloaded with these books:

Preloaded eBooks include U.S. Department of Education suggested Reading List:


Henrik Ibsen, A Doll's House
Edmond Rostand, Cyrano De Bergerac

William Shakespeare, As you Like it
Richard II
Romeo and Juliet
Macbeth
Hamlet

Moliere, Tartuffe OR The Hypocrite
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities
Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights
George Eliot, Silas Marner
Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles
Victor Hugo, Les Miserables
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness
Henry Thoreau, Walden
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
Stephen Crane, Maggie, a girl of the Streets
Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage
Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Jack London, The Call of the wild
Herman Melville, Moby Dick, or, the whale
Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince
Aesop’s Fables
H. Andersen, Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen
Mary Esther MacGregor, Stories of King Arthur
Jules Verne, Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea
Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, and Other Poems
Homer, the Iliad
Emily Dickinson, Poems by emily Dickinson
Henry Longfellow, Evangeline
Homer, The Odyssey
Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man
Truman Capote, In Cold Blood
Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway(1925)
Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass

Hamlet53
04-16-2010, 06:49 PM
I received the e-mail from Pavel (Ectaco support) that jetBook-Lite comes preloaded with these books:

Preloaded eBooks include U.S. Department of Education suggested Reading List:


Henrik Ibsen, A Doll's House
Edmond Rostand, Cyrano De Bergerac

William Shakespeare, As you Like it
Richard II
Romeo and Juliet
Macbeth
Hamlet

Moliere, Tartuffe OR The Hypocrite
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities
Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights
George Eliot, Silas Marner

. . .

Homer, The Odyssey
Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man
Truman Capote, In Cold Blood
Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway(1925)
Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass

Careful you'll start a discussion of the merits of each book. ;) Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens instead of David Copperfield or Nicholas Nickleby?

I agree that e-books are a natural in education for literature, but I will be a long time and a lot better rendering of equations and formulas before e-books will make inroads into other subjects.

SensualPoet
04-17-2010, 12:06 AM
I also think that it wouldn't be money well spent. Let's face it, e-readers are luxury items and currently libraries are most important to the poorer communities. In some cases the only place kids can use a computer or read a book, other than at school, is the library. If the library has to choose between an e-book and a p-book, they need to go with the p-book because that will be the greater benefit to the most people and that is more in line with Carnegie's vision.

A few days ago, I took the bait. Upon reflection, I've changed my mind. :)

Libraries, even in Andrew Carnegie's vision, aren't here merely to provide services to those who rely on the loan of paper: it was about the content. If some budget is spent on users who engage the library over the Internet, using their own e-reader ... terrific. The object is to expand reading, access to knowledge, using the library as curator to ensure a minimum set of standards ... a robust e-book collection is not an elitist diversion but indeed fulfills the mandate and original Carnegie vision.

pilotbob
04-17-2010, 12:29 AM
Libraries, even in Andrew Carnegie's vision, aren't here merely to provide services to those who rely on the loan of paper: it was about the content. If some budget is spent on users who engage the library over the Internet, using their own e-reader ... terrific. The object is to expand reading, access to knowledge, using the library as curator to ensure a minimum set of standards ... a robust e-book collection is not an elitist diversion but indeed fulfills the mandate and original Carnegie vision.

Exactly. And libraries for digital content can be distributed and still provide service to people all over the world. While your local public library is a great place and serves a purpose. For a fraction of a cost a web server and storage system that could serve many more people. It would simplify research also.

Did you know the Library of Congress is going to archive every tweet ever made and make them available to the public?

BOb

Rich_D
04-17-2010, 02:28 PM
A few days ago, I took the bait. Upon reflection, I've changed my mind. :)

Libraries, even in Andrew Carnegie's vision, aren't here merely to provide services to those who rely on the loan of paper: it was about the content. If some budget is spent on users who engage the library over the Internet, using their own e-reader ... terrific. The object is to expand reading, access to knowledge, using the library as curator to ensure a minimum set of standards ... a robust e-book collection is not an elitist diversion but indeed fulfills the mandate and original Carnegie vision.

:bookworm:

You make a good point. Personally, I was a little shocked that the library even offered ebooks. I'm sure they will continue to expand the selections but I can still see the bulk of the budget being spent on paper.