View Full Version : Young eBook Readers .. Do They Exist ???


Kevin2960
03-31-2010, 09:04 AM
So Bloomsbury are Releasing the Harry Potter Books with New Covers, but no eBooks,

Given the target audience is the Younger Reader (I know the adults read them too) I do wonder how many Under 16's read ebooks ?

:bookworm::book2:

daveps
03-31-2010, 09:12 AM
My 13 year old rarely puts the thing down, and when he does it's to read a paper book!

Kevin2960
03-31-2010, 09:13 AM
Can I add a second Poll ?

If so How ?

Kevin2960
03-31-2010, 09:14 AM
My 13 year old rarely puts the thing down, and when he does it's to read a paper book!


I'm glad to hear it, I must confess I just don't know if youngster do on the whole :)

lilac_jive
03-31-2010, 09:26 AM
My 13 year old sister has a Sony and loves it.

abookreader
03-31-2010, 09:30 AM
Sure, kids love electronics.

Our library Overdrive eBook is adding Young Adult titles like crazy. Especially those teen girl High School Vampire love story type things. I figure somebody with the purchasing power must have a 13yo daughter or something.

ShellShock
03-31-2010, 09:41 AM
I voted no just because nobody else had. I'll get my coat...

leebase
03-31-2010, 11:01 AM
My kids read on their iPod Touches. My oldest (15) still prefers paper books, my other two like the ebooks.

Lee

rcuadro
03-31-2010, 11:05 AM
We bought my niece a K2 and she is reading almost none stop. She read the 6 books that are out for the House of Night series in about 2 weeks... and she is only 13

Kevin2960
03-31-2010, 03:38 PM
Deleted as poorly thought out post Sorry

rcuadro
03-31-2010, 04:19 PM
Removed by me :)

Kevin2960
03-31-2010, 05:53 PM
Not in my opinion. I think that kids need to spend less time on the computer and more time outside or reading :book2:
Not to mention that i do not want my 12 year old interacting with adults he or I do not know.



Yes I understand what your saying, and to be honest I phrased my post wrongly, i think its great that eReaders are encouraging kids to read ..... but YES they should get outside more and be active, thats far better for them

But my opinion is suspect ..... because i think JK Rowling and the Harry Potter Books actually Got millions of kids (Adults too for that matter) reading books :bookworm::book2:

Elfwreck
03-31-2010, 06:22 PM
My kids (11 & 14 yrs) are both happy reading either paper or pixels. Neither has a dedicated ebook reader, but they borrow my PRS-505 sometimes, and have both read on my Clie. I've got a Rocketbook for the older child as soon as I figure out how to make it happy with Vista.

I think the main issue with getting adolescents to read ebooks is hardware--finding something durable enough for the average teen's carelessness. (Not that they're always careless, but it only takes one "oops" moment to kill an e-ink screen.)

Kevin2960
03-31-2010, 06:29 PM
My kids (11 & 14 yrs) are both happy reading either paper or pixels. Neither has a dedicated ebook reader, but they borrow my PRS-505 sometimes, and have both read on my Clie. I've got a Rocketbook for the older child as soon as I figure out how to make it happy with Vista.

I think the main issue with getting adolescents to read ebooks is hardware--finding something durable enough for the average teen's carelessness. (Not that they're always careless, but it only takes one "oops" moment to kill an e-ink screen.)


Do we know each other ? .... how come you know how Oopsy I am even now aged 48

But seriously a very good point about Durability, it's not just Teens that could do with that, from what I've seen in other threads :eek:

Ravensknight
03-31-2010, 06:39 PM
The other thing keeping teens and youngsters from reading on Ereaders is the fact that they cost, quite a bit. An adult with a full time job and can save up, or even splurge and buy one. The younger demographic doesn't have that kind of buying power. They get smaller amounts and hence tend to spend it on things within their price range soon after getting it.
All the ereader people I know are over 25 :-D

TallMomof2
03-31-2010, 06:39 PM
I gave my 12yo daughter my Cybook Gen 3 and she enjoys reading on it. She also reads tons of pbooks, too.

Kevin2960
03-31-2010, 06:47 PM
The other thing keeping teens and youngsters from reading on Ereaders is the fact that they cost, quite a bit. An adult with a full time job and can save up, or even splurge and buy one. The younger demographic doesn't have that kind of buying power. They get smaller amounts and hence tend to spend it on things within their price range soon after getting it.
All the ereader people I know are over 25 :-D


Good Point :)

cbarnett
03-31-2010, 09:48 PM
My 13 year old daughter has been reading ebooks for the last three years. When I can find the books she likes to read in ebook format and a price I'm willing to pay, of course! :)

csskkai
04-01-2010, 12:21 AM
I got my first reader when I was 15 or 16. Would have gotten one earlier, but didn't have the cash on me that young.

Kevin2960
04-01-2010, 07:48 AM
My 13 year old daughter has been reading ebooks for the last three years. When I can find the books she likes to read in ebook format and a price I'm willing to pay, of course! :)



What :eek: Daddy won't pay ANY price for his little DARLING :p

:rofl::rofl::rofl:


But it is a shame that even eBooks for the young are so over-priced and that an affordable durable eReader isn't yet available that is suitable to make eReading more readily available to youngster :book2:

Latinandgreek
04-01-2010, 11:08 AM
I voted for "other", because I do think that there is a market for young readers (my niece has been asking for an ebook reader), but I do not personally know anyone under the age of 16 who reads ebooks (to the extent of my knowledge.)

ardeegee
04-01-2010, 12:49 PM
I donno, but can I have 10 photos of them using one?
.
.
.
.

Logseman
04-01-2010, 01:36 PM
:rofl::rofl::rofl:

JSWolf
04-01-2010, 02:37 PM
Not for long. The kids won't be able to afford eBooks with the new pricing. :eek:

rebarnmom
04-01-2010, 05:30 PM
I voted "other". My 11 year-old would love one (in PINK), if we could afford it! Her PB's books are starting to overtake her bookshelves as space is becoming increasingly limited!

I'm too protective (selfish?) of mine to let her use it. :o

Fat Abe
04-01-2010, 05:43 PM
I think the main issue with getting adolescents to read ebooks is hardware--finding something durable enough for the average teen's carelessness. (Not that they're always careless, but it only takes one "oops" moment to kill an e-ink screen.)

Since the intended audience for ereaders is the adult market, I don't see ruggedness being designed into the devices. Whereas, for portable gaming systems, the manufacturers definitely took the time and effort to design devices that could take a drop. Examples include the Nintendo Game Boy and Nintendo DS. My child has dropped these more than a dozen times each, due either to his frustration with a game or his overexcitement. I won't call him careless, since he might be reading this post. LOL. When it came time to add a Sony PSP to his collection, we found a hard plastic clamshell case, and that has, for the most part, protected the system very well. I am researching the options for current generation readers.

Now, returning to the topic at hand, this is my recommendation to parents. Ignore the cost of the ereader. Even if you have to buy 3 during the years between 10 and 18, it's worth it to get the child to read. It will save you thousands in the future. I shudder at the thought of my child growing up to be a slacker at 25, too lazy to read or write.

Kevin2960
04-01-2010, 06:21 PM
I voted "other". My 11 year-old would love one (in PINK), if we could afford it! Her PB's books are starting to overtake her bookshelves as space is becoming increasingly limited!

I'm too protective (selfish?) of mine to let her use it. :o


Most of us are :o We think a lot of our eReaders, but the serious point is the cost and vulnerability of the machines I guess

Kevin2960
04-01-2010, 06:26 PM
Since the intended audience for ereaders is the adult market, I don't see ruggedness being designed into the devices. Whereas, for portable gaming systems, the manufacturers definitely took the time and effort to design devices that could take a drop. Examples include the Nintendo Game Boy and Nintendo DS. My child has dropped these more than a dozen times each, due either to his frustration with a game or his overexcitement. I won't call him careless, since he might be reading this post. LOL. When it came time to add a Sony PSP to his collection, we found a hard plastic clamshell case, and that has, for the most part, protected the system very well. I am researching the options for current generation readers.

Now, returning to the topic at hand, this is my recommendation to parents. Ignore the cost of the ereader. Even if you have to buy 3 during the years between 10 and 18, it's worth it to get the child to read. It will save you thousands in the future. I shudder at the thought of my child growing up to be a slacker at 25, too lazy to read or write.


Excellent Points, especially last paragraph, I think eReaders will like digital cameras and mobile phones became, a Massive Massive draw for the youngsters even to the point they may never read anything else .....in 5 years or so who knows :bulb2:

Logseman
04-01-2010, 06:42 PM
You know, there are literate slackers too, and I'd say more than illiterate ones. Pretentious artsy little suckers who aspire to win their way through life by packing some letters in paper and having people buy that. I'm one of them so I know what I'm talking about. Get your child to work hard, and teach him that reading and writing is an enjoyment, but nothing more.

R.G. Cordiner
07-17-2010, 09:30 PM
I have to say as a teacher I am happy for kids to be reading - anything that inspires them to do is a great thing.

AnemicOak
07-18-2010, 09:07 PM
My 8 (9 next month) year old nephew is reading them on my old Sony 505. He loves it and is always asking for new books. I'm hoping the library will start carrying more kids books soon.

sabredog
07-19-2010, 03:23 AM
My youngest little lady has a language disability. That is; she has a reading, comprehension and mathematics ability somewhat lower than her age. This presents itself in the form of bad spelling, difficulty expressing concepts etc in written form and mathematic problem solving. Verbally, she has no issues in the main expressing herself but often finds the wrong words to describe issues.

Two years ago, she developed a love of reading. You might think this a bit silly, but she fell in love with the Twilight series and through that now loves reading fantasy novels. Her current fav being Tamora Pierce. She also has the full Tolkien series in her expanding book collection.

I have shown her my PRS-300 and Kobo, explained e-ink displays to her but her comment is always...

"Daddy, great way to read, but at the moment I love the smell of books!"

So in short, no, my 16 year old baby girl does not want to read ebooks....yet.

However she loves to read online Manga romance comics! So I made an affirmative to the poll.

Sweetpea
07-19-2010, 03:50 AM
Kids don't read anymore... They watch tv and play games.



Naturally, I don't have kids, and my nephews live on the other side of the country, so I've absolutely no idea! Oh, and the next-door neighbour girl is too busy with the cows from our across-the-street neighbour...

seagull
07-19-2010, 06:50 AM
I'm 14. I've also got a friend that owns a Sony Reader but never uses it as "it's just not the same as paper books." :smack:

Sweetpea
07-19-2010, 07:47 AM
I'm 14. I've also got a friend that owns a Sony Reader but never uses it as "it's just not the same as paper books." :smack:

Well, he does have a point... It's not the same! I mean, one is made from paper, the other from plastic, metal, and whatever else is required to make an electronic device :p

seagull
07-19-2010, 09:03 AM
Well, he does have a point... It's not the same! I mean, one is made from paper, the other from plastic, metal, and whatever else is required to make an electronic device :p

I suppose :p However then he goes into the intricacies of the feel of paper, the weight of a pbook and the smell of an antique edition. :chinscratch:

Sweetpea
07-19-2010, 09:15 AM
I suppose :p However then he goes into the intricacies of the feel of paper, the weight of a pbook and the smell of an antique edition. :chinscratch:

I agree, the page is often hard to turn because it's too smooth. And the weight is a bit too high to hold comfortably in one hand, but, with some practice you might manage to keep it open! And you could even do something about that smell, just put a tissue with some perfume in front of your nice, it's what they did in the 1700's as well (you know, when washing wasn't really in vogue...)! :rofl:

Zorz
07-21-2010, 07:16 AM
Id be more worried about kids actually reading any book let alone an ebook.

Hellmark
07-21-2010, 12:17 PM
I got my ebook reader shortly before my 25th birthday, but I've been reading ebooks since I was in highscool, on a PDA or laptop, or desktop. Most of the younger readers I do know can't afford ebook readers, but if they can get to something that can read ebooks they do.

As far as the Harry Potter issue, that's more to do with JK Rowling. She's been one of the ebook holdouts.

B.Tackitt
07-21-2010, 12:22 PM
My DS #1 got one of the first K1s and has been happily reading on it for years. He is now 18, and about to take it to college with him, although I am thinking the DX with the larger screen & PDF capabilities might be better... we are still debating this.

DD would steal her brother's K anytime she could until we got her one of her own.. and she was 14 at the time.

DS#2, never wanted a Kindle, but does use kindle app on his iPhone, and he is 17.

Maggie Leung
07-21-2010, 12:36 PM
My nephew is about to turn 2 and loves to "read." He's the usual kind of toddler -- can't sit still. The only exception: He will voluntarily grab a book and sit himself quietly in your lap so you can read to him. He'll listen intently and grab a new one each time you finish, till he goes through a stack of books. He's able to "read" multiple-syllable words now, though it's probably more memorization / picture association at this point. We're encouraging his interest in books, of course, but trying to limit his exposure to e-books. We don't want him to get hooked on gadgets rather than reading at such a young age, when picture books are necessary.

kjk
07-21-2010, 01:56 PM
My 15 year old used my Sony 505 for a while, but went back to mostly physical books, mostly because of our good local library access. But the iPad has definitely brought him back to reading eBooks.