View Full Version : How do you back up your books?


ficbot
03-20-2010, 05:36 PM
I am wondering how everybody backs up their stuff. I have some of my books on the Kindle and some not, but I am still concerned about backing them up because a) not all of them are from the same source so if I ever had to re-create my whole collection from scratch, it would take ages and b) some of them have had work done on them such as conversions that would take ages to re-do. So, what I had been doing was backing up everything using Time Machine onto a backup drive. But then I started thinking I needed a second back-up not at home. I thought about sending them all 'into the cloud' as attachments in my email and storing them there, but again, tat would take forever as each book would need to be emailed individually. So what I did was bu an 8 gb USB thumb drive (my collection is not even 1 gb even though it it over 800 books) and backed up the whole Calibre library folder onto that and I have attached it to my keychain so it is with me when I leave the house.

As far as original files go, if the book was eReader and I converted it to HTML, I am keeping the HTML in Calibre but I am not keeping the original eReader anywhere. If it is a mobi or a Fictionwise multiformat, I am keeping the mobi original in Calibre since I am using mobi right now and since I can easily convert them in Calibre later to something else. And if it was originally an epub, I am keeping the epub backed up in a separate folder since they gum up Calibre if I leave them in there. People told me epub loses a little in conversion to mobi and if I want to convert them to something else later, to keep the epub just in case so that's why. I have not yet backed up this 'mobi originals' folder onto something else though---I am just backing up my Calibre library for now since I may want to put some other backups on the thumb drive and don't want to run out of room.

So does this sound like enough backing up? If not, what do you recommend?

Ea
03-20-2010, 06:03 PM
I'm probably being a bit more laissez-faire than you. I still back up my files, but I don't worry so much about converted files unless it took a lot of work to convert them. In my mind, as long as I keep the originals I can always convert them again should I want to read the book again (I'm a great re-reader so it's quite possible I would want to).

In a general sense with regards to backup, I back up the files that I would never wish to lose and would not be able to recreate in any way. I usually imagine 'what if I lost it in a fire?' When I put the idea to the test, it's quite amazing how little on my computer that is not expendable. Though there are still a lot I'd love to keep anyway. So I back up all of that :)

Sydney's Mom
03-20-2010, 06:17 PM
I am a bit more anal. I keep all of my books in Calibre - I download the books I buy at Amazon, and keep those in Calibre as well. Once a week, I back-up my computer to a portable hard drive. But I also have Dropbox back-up for my library, and I have an SD card that I have labeled books. So, I have it backed up three ways. I have broken computers and lost kindles, so I have learned my lesson about back-ups (I hope).

Jack Tingle
03-20-2010, 06:38 PM
CDs + 1/2 Tb of eSATA drive. Anal, me?

Regards,
Jack Tingle

Ea
03-20-2010, 06:46 PM
Perhaps not. But how much of it do you need to back up?

poohbear_nc
03-20-2010, 08:53 PM
I use DropBox and a USB drive and a CD archive.

sabredog
03-20-2010, 09:07 PM
I keep all my reading material on my PC data drive, plus 500mB external 3.5" mirrored to a 2.5" mini-drive as part of normal backup routine.

texasnightowl
03-20-2010, 09:14 PM
Right now, the books are all on my PC via Calibre and backed up to my 2nd PC (a Windows Home Server) and backed up on a USB key and I'm considering doing the dropbox thing too.

GhostHawk
03-20-2010, 09:22 PM
DVD or Double layer DVD, plus the wife just got me a 16gig SDHC card.

Currently sitting on aprox 5000 titles, some 3 gig. But that is my working list, the stuff that is sorted, converted, checked for duplication, file names fixed and ready to read.. I have a lot more I'm working on. On a second partition I have another 6 gig setup by genre that I'm about ready to burn to a DL dvd.

Then there is one more big pile that is yet to be converted, sorted, filename fixed, etc.
20,000 books and 10 gig in that, but I don't know how much of that is duplication. Authors listed as both David Drake, and Drake, David, Drake,D, etc.

Its a big job trying to sort it all out, and calibre just made a bigger mess. I was trying to add books and it seperated each title, put it in a folder in a folder.

I'm afraid I don't have a whole lot of patience for the job.
No software I've looked at really seemed to suit what I wanted.

The idea is to eventually get it all sorted cataloged, fixed, and burned to DVD, with a separate backup on the 16gig SD card.

foghat
03-20-2010, 11:18 PM
I back up all me ebooks (original drm file, and any converted files, plus calibre library). Back up to a network drive and also to online storage (idrive.com).

All my backup jobs are scheduled to run nightly, so I never lose more than a days worth of changes/additions. imo, with online storage being so cheap these days, it is silly not to have an offsite (online) backup.

Most importantly - make sure you test your backups every now and then to make sure:
1. they are acutally backing up
2. you can actually retrieve your backed up files

animedude01
03-21-2010, 12:40 AM
I have almost all my ebooks in Calibre and sync the Calibre library with my laptop, home server, and work computer. Almost all the ebooks that aren't in Calibre are PDF references and those get synced between my laptop, home server and work machine.

I've already had a huge loss when my home server hosed the data partition beyond easy recovery and I lost about 2TB of media files. I didn't have it backed up since when I ripped them all 2TB was a lot of space, plus I have the originals, so I didn't lose anything critical. It's actually easier now since I don't have to re-rip most of it, I can just download it off the net. All the originals are in boxed in the garage.

The ebooks I back up since it may become difficult to recover or re-download some of them and they don't really take up much space.

frank.w
03-21-2010, 01:22 AM
I use a couple of .5 TB "Free Agent" external drives with a USB interface. A couple of years ago I invested in a fairly sizeable Raid configuration for my main PC, and the one time I had a disc failure (because I forgot to connect the power to it after a fiddle with the cables) the system set about the job of re-building the missing disc and the next morning I had a complete system again. (be sure to un-plug the backup drive(s) after use).

Disc space is so cheap these days ($160.00 NZD for a 1 Tb internal Seagate) that *some* kind of backup is affordable. Partitioning your drives to keep your OS separate from your data also makes a lot of sense. I reserved 85 Gig for my old XP system, and 100 Gb for my Windows 7 setups and haven't even come close to popping those limits.

Free public spaces like Microsofts "SkyDrive" and the photo site "PhotoBucket" also offer affordable means of protecting your "non-easily-recoverable" data.

I wish I could report that I had an elaborate system of backing up all the new and valuable manterial that comes into my system -- back when I was cutting code I used "SyncBack SE" to grab all the new stuff and tuck it away -- these days its just a bulk copy of my more valuable user folders.

Frank

pilotbob
03-21-2010, 01:33 AM
I have all my books in Calibre... then I have my calibre library in my Dropbox folder.

Dropbox is a sync service that you can install on one or more computers. It keeps copies of everything on multiple computers and one copy on their cloud servers. It is automatic and instant. You don't have to do anything but keep drop box running. Whenever something changes it will get synced with that cloud and other PCs almost instantly.

Dropbox gives you 2GB for free... You can get more (up to 3GB) for free by having others sign up using your referral ID. Or, you can pay a fee to get more space. Your 1GB library would fit fine into the free space.

Just today I d/l'ed 26 recent Kindle purchases, liberated them and put them into calibre. Within a few minutes they were all safely in my dropbox.

If you decide to get a dropbox, I would appreciate it if you use my referral link: https://www.dropbox.com/referrals/NTMwMDU2MDk

Once you get bigger than the free dropbox you could pay... but it isn't as cost effective as some other services.

Jungle Disk is software that you pay a monthly fee for the software plus you pay $.15 per GB per month stored on their servers. $ wise this is the most cost effective storage for medium size ... perhaps up to 10-30Gb or so.

Then if you get really big you would move to something like Crash Plan... which gives you unlimited storage for less than $4 a month if you pay for 3 years up front. If you have multiple-Pcs you can back them up with the family plan for $5 a month if you pre-pay for 3 years.

The above is my progression plan. I also back up using Time Machine locally.. the cloud stuff is just emergency... plus the ability to access stuff from any Internet connected PC is a bonus.

BOb

pilotbob
03-21-2010, 01:35 AM
Perhaps not. But how much of it do you need to back up?

That is a good question. Pretty much 100% of your books are already backed up... at the location you original acquired them from.

Of course, re-downloading, liberating, converting, etc... would take a lot of time.. and for the cost of "free" or at most $5 a month or so you can get the stuff stored off-site online pretty easily.

See my previous post about dropbox, Jungle Disk and Crashplan.

BOb

animedude01
03-21-2010, 01:48 AM
That is a good question. Pretty much 100% of your books are already backed up... at the location you original acquired them from.

Of course, re-downloading, liberating, converting, etc... would take a lot of time.. and for the cost of "free" or at most $5 a month or so you can get the stuff stored off-site online pretty easily.

See my previous post about dropbox, Jungle Disk and Crashplan.

BOb

What happens if they go out of business, decide (or are forced) to drop a publisher, or lose their records for some reason? You could be out of luck trying to re-download it. It's a good idea to back up all your downloads and not rely on the vendor. An example would be Fictionwise stating on their FAQ that they can't guarantee that your books will remain in your bookshelf forever. Don't take a change, download them all, then back them up.

pilotbob
03-21-2010, 02:04 AM
What happens if they go out of business, decide (or are forced) to drop a publisher, or lose their records for some reason? You could be out of luck trying to re-download it. It's a good idea to back up all your downloads and not rely on the vendor. An example would be Fictionwise stating on their FAQ that they can't guarantee that your books will remain in your bookshelf forever. Don't take a change, download them all, then back them up.

Sure... it could happen. But, they would have to become unavailable and you would have to have data loss.

I'm not saying don't back up.... I'm just saying it probably won't be catastrophic. (I back up locally and online). Also, I assume someone that has over 800 books probably has a pretty heavy public domain/free ebooks library (or has been reading ebooks for a long time) which are readily available on the net.

BOb

Nakor
03-21-2010, 02:20 AM
Because Calibre doesn't conform to my particular narrow-minded concept of organization (:p) I tend to do it entirely by hand. I just have all of them in a folder, organized into subfolders the exact way I want them to be sorted on my Libre, and then keep a copy of that folder on my HDD, an external flash drive, and of course on my Libre's SD card.

ChrisC333
03-21-2010, 02:37 AM
I have a very simple system.

It's mostly based on a) having lots of books now and b) not actually caring as much as I used to.


In theory, I back up my computer once a week using Time Machine, and stick the second drive back in the safe. This covers most eventualities.


But the real beauty of it is that at my age I no longer expect to remember exactly which books I owned anyway. And I'm not really bothered if the occasional one goes missing.

I was talking to an older friend recently and said:

"Please stop me if I've told you this anecdote before"

To which he replied:

"Carry on. It doesn't matter - I won't remember it if you have...." :rolleyes:

It getting that way with the books I read too. I can re-read the old favourites every couple of years and they'll seem partly familiar yet still fresh.... So it's become a case of Back-up, Shmack-up - does it really matter that much?

Thanks to full bookshelves, a reasonable computer system, and the wonders of encroaching senility I'll never run out of things to read and re-read. If I unknowingly ended up buying the same thing twice it's not a big deal. Let the young control freaks fret about keeping all their possessions in perfectly precise piles at their fingertips - I've abandoned the pretence that I know where everything is around here anyway.

That reminds me - today is Sunday. If I can just recall the combination to the safe I'll do that back up..... maybe soonish.... ;)

Sweetpea
03-21-2010, 08:27 AM
I keep the original book, the de-drm'd book, if it was a drm'd book, the source in HTML, and the generated epub, mobi and pdf books (from those source HTML). They are in two locations, my file server and my external HD.

On the readers: my JE100 and Loox720 both have all mobipocket books (de-drm'd), my Mini has the epubs, mobipocket (de-drm'd) and pdf books.

Hamlet53
03-21-2010, 08:52 AM
First off there are always at least three, and sometimes more separate copies of each book on my main computer. If I have purchased a ebook from Sony, Amazon, etc. the original in what ever format is in the original download folder. A copy of every file from whatever source is in a directory organized into fiction and non-fiction with sub-directories for each author. Here is a copy of the original file from whatever source, a copy with DRM stripped (if applicable), and a file converted to epub (if original format was other). All the epub format files here are than duplicated again in my Calibre folder. My main computer is set up with RAID 1 so that I have enough confidence in my data integrity that I figure a once a week backup to an external USB hard drive is good enough.

I don't trust the cloud services to be reliable and always available to be willing to pay for one, and the free services do not provide enough space.

Terisa de morgan
03-21-2010, 09:05 AM
Well, I don't use calibre to manage my library. I have a folder structure I like, an access file where I keep all the info I care about my books and, for every book I have a rar file which contains: a directory with html/opf necessary to recreate it, a lit copy, a prc copy and an epub copy. If I've purchased the book, I keep too the original book with DRM and the original book without DRM (without my modifications). I keep all these files in two hard-disks I synchronize daily and in an USB stick I synchronize weekly.

Dellaster
03-21-2010, 12:07 PM
Everything's in my Calibre folder and I only have ebooks I've actually read or intend to read in the near future, so it's still less than 500 MB. I chose to use SugarSync's 2 GB free account since I could just point it at my existing Calibre folder and forget it. Works for me.

pilotbob
03-21-2010, 12:11 PM
In theory, I back up my computer once a week using Time Machine, and stick the second drive back in the safe. This covers most eventualities.


Are you talking about OS X "Time Machine"? If so, that actually runs every HOUR... copying anything that changed on your Mac to the Time Machine external drive.

BOb

TallMomof2
03-21-2010, 12:16 PM
1. Remove the DRM
2. Load into Calibre.
3. PC is automatically backed up every night to my Windows Home Server with duplication turned on. (All the home PCs are backed up this way.)
4. Calibre folder is in my Dropbox folder.
5. PC is backed up to Carbonite.

pilotbob
03-21-2010, 12:19 PM
1. Remove the DRM
2. Load into Calibre.
3. PC is automatically backed up every night to my Windows Home Server with duplication turned on. (All the home PCs are backed up this way.)
4. Calibre folder is in my Dropbox folder.
5. PC is backed up to Carbonite.

:dtw:

I bow down to your backup superiority!

Why don't you back up your Windows Home Server to the cloud rather than the PC?

BOb

JohnN
03-21-2010, 07:39 PM
1. Originals are stored on a USB drive and on the cloud via CrashPlan

2. I deDRM a copy, and convert to epub - for personal use only, and store these on Dropbox


(Hi all, I'm John and I'm new)
J

ChrisC333
03-21-2010, 08:13 PM
Are you talking about OS X "Time Machine"? If so, that actually runs every HOUR... copying anything that changed on your Mac to the Time Machine external drive.

BOb

It only backs up every hour if the drive is connected. :)


The drawback to leaving a backup drive permanently connected is that you risk losing the whole lot in the case of theft or fire. When I first started working with computers around 25 years ago the first data loss I ever experienced was due to theft not drive failure. Fortunately I had drilled into the company the need to back up their data and keep the copy in the safe - which they been doing. Theft of computers/laptops from homes and businesses is actually pretty common now, plus external back-up drives are a perfect small item to slip into a thief's pocket or backpack.

I've found it a lot easier to get back-up drills established in businesses than in a home situation. At home most people mean to get a routine going but rarely stick to it. It's not so much the fine detail of the plan that's important as whether they actually DO it or not. ;)

Once a week works best for me because I know that - in reality - I won't keep disconnecting and re-connecting it every time I leave the house. The stuff that gets added in between is mostly not irreplaceable and could be re-entered if necessary. If there is anything vital in between I stick it on a thumb-drive or email it to myself, where it stays on the server for a week.

Cheers,

Chris

pilotbob
03-21-2010, 08:17 PM
It only backs up every hour if the drive is connected. :)


Well, you got me there.


The drawback to leaving a backup drive permanently connected is that you risk losing the whole lot in the case of theft or fire.

Of course, that is why I use a two layer backup system. Time Machine is for data loss (even accidental deletion) due to system failure.

Backing up to the cloud protects against catastrophic loss (theft, fire, etc.) where both the Mac drive and the Time Machine drive are lost.

(Actually I have another layer, I do a full drive backup with SuperDuper every now and then which is a mirror of my system drive that I could boot from and work off of until I get a change to rebuild the system using the more up to date Time Machine drive.)

BOb

fugazied
03-21-2010, 08:55 PM
I use DropBox and a USB drive and a CD archive.

Dropbox is awesome, I need to use it more.

Personally, I remove the DRM and save it to my mac (which is backed up automatically by Time Machine). In addition I have a script which uploads copies to the Amazon S3 cloud and I have copies on a PC in the house as well.

Ideally you want copies of your books in the cloud somewhere, because the worst case scenario is having your house burn down or every computer in your house stolen. In that scenario all local backups are gone and that's why you need remote as well as local.

ChrisC333
03-22-2010, 01:22 AM
Of course, that is why I use a two layer backup system. Time Machine is for data loss (even accidental deletion) due to system failure.

Backing up to the cloud protects against catastrophic loss (theft, fire, etc.) where both the Mac drive and the Time Machine drive are lost.

(Actually I have another layer, I do a full drive backup with SuperDuper every now and then which is a mirror of my system drive that I could boot from and work off of until I get a change to rebuild the system using the more up to date Time Machine drive.)

BOb

It sounds like you've got all the bases very well covered there Bob. :thumbsup:


Over the years I used a variety of backup systems, all of which worked well enough at the time. But in the event I had a pretty good run anyway. A few problems here and there but only one complete hard drive crash where the data couldn't be retrieved off it using fairly simple methods.

Now that I'm retired though, I've come to the liberating conclusion that almost nothing currently on any of the computers is irreplaceable, or would even be that much of a loss. Even reinstalling all the programs from scratch isn't a problem once time isn't so pressing. So a very simple system is plenty.

TallMomof2
03-22-2010, 03:00 PM
:dtw:

I bow down to your backup superiority!

Why don't you back up your Windows Home Server to the cloud rather than the PC?

BOb

I actually had my PC backing up to the cloud before I built my WHS. What I plan on doing for the WHS is to purchase an IoSafe (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001VKKZHQ/?tag=homeserver-20) and back up my critical files to that. My WHS has 10TB storage (yes that's tera) but most of it is recording space for my HTPC and isn't considered critical. Once I add the ioSafe I will most likely discontinue Cloud backup because it's painfully slow both backing up and restoring.

pilotbob
03-22-2010, 03:05 PM
IWhat I plan on doing for the WHS is to purchase an IoSafe (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001VKKZHQ/?tag=homeserver-20) and back up my critical files to that.

Hmm... looks interesting if you can get back to your house after the mud slide.

Of course, it doesn't solve the theft issue.

BOb

Shaggy
03-22-2010, 05:49 PM
I've got a NAS RAID array on the home network that most of my PCs use as a backup. My wife and I each have our own "ebook archive" directory on it that we copy stuff to.

Other than that, just burn them to CD/DVD. If you're really paranoid, make a second copy on CD/DVD and store it at your parents house, etc.

TallMomof2
03-22-2010, 09:20 PM
Hmm... looks interesting if you can get back to your house after the mud slide.

Of course, it doesn't solve the theft issue.

BOb

No mudslides around here :) I used to do the burn to CD/DVD method but it wasn't something I could set up to do automatically. And then you still need a different safe place to store your media.

Personally, I'm more concerned about losing data through losing a hard drive or user error than I am about theft.

alecE
03-24-2010, 01:03 AM
Although I've got multiple locations for my ebook files (My Digital Editions, the DRM-stripping directories, the base library for editing (Three loud cheers for Sigil) and finally the Calibre directory) this can't be considered an adequate backup as it all resides on just two disk spindles - laptop hard-drive and and USB 1Tb drive - think what could possibly go wrong...

I'm on the cusp now between continuing with CD/DVD archiving or using memory sticks/SD cards - cheap convenience versus volatility.

Having seen many instances of hardware failure (and experienced a couple myself) I completely agree with whoever said "Back it up, and test the backups".

Oh, and how nice to know I'm not the only anal retentive here :-)

ChrisC333
03-24-2010, 02:41 AM
Oh, and how nice to know I'm not the only anal retentive here :-)

That's a good insight. :D :thumbsup:

I think that it's really not the method itself that counts so much as matching the right one to the correct personality. If it floats your boat to have multiple solutions to cover every conceivable eventuality then there's doubtless a great deal of pleasure to be had with tinkering with your system, polishing and fine tuning it all. It's all good.

But if that isn't your style, then it can be just a pain in the arse and an outlay of time, money and effort for not all that much return. If I lost every book on this computer right now I could get them all back from the Internet fairly quickly and easily. Some I wouldn't bother with (they can stay right there on someone else's server....) and if there were any actual losses, well "c'est la vie" - there's plenty more to buy and read.

The extent to which I still do back stuff up probably just reflects my current rating on the Anal Retentive Scale. And the older I get the more my ARS slips. :)

Chris

ChrisC333
03-24-2010, 02:55 AM
Here's a back-up story, provided by our local computer shop.


One of the nearby businesses called my friend at the shop to say they'd had a drive failure that needed sorting out. The techie went out and was assured that it should be easy to fix as they had religiously backed up every night (for over two years) and kept the disks in their safe.

However, when he looked at the disks the file was surprisingly small. Tiny in fact. So he asked if they could give him a demo on their other computer, and show him exactly what they did. Sure enough, they were rigorously doing a backup at the end of every single day...... of all the icons on the desktop. Nothing else. ::smack: :smack:

It cost them more than they had bargained for to retrieve the data, but if you want it back badly enough you can usually get most if not all of it back. :)

delphidb96
03-24-2010, 03:42 AM
I am wondering how everybody backs up their stuff. I have some of my books on the Kindle and some not, but I am still concerned about backing them up because a) not all of them are from the same source so if I ever had to re-create my whole collection from scratch, it would take ages and b) some of them have had work done on them such as conversions that would take ages to re-do. So, what I had been doing was backing up everything using Time Machine onto a backup drive. But then I started thinking I needed a second back-up not at home. I thought about sending them all 'into the cloud' as attachments in my email and storing them there, but again, tat would take forever as each book would need to be emailed individually. So what I did was bu an 8 gb USB thumb drive (my collection is not even 1 gb even though it it over 800 books) and backed up the whole Calibre library folder onto that and I have attached it to my keychain so it is with me when I leave the house.

As far as original files go, if the book was eReader and I converted it to HTML, I am keeping the HTML in Calibre but I am not keeping the original eReader anywhere. If it is a mobi or a Fictionwise multiformat, I am keeping the mobi original in Calibre since I am using mobi right now and since I can easily convert them in Calibre later to something else. And if it was originally an epub, I am keeping the epub backed up in a separate folder since they gum up Calibre if I leave them in there. People told me epub loses a little in conversion to mobi and if I want to convert them to something else later, to keep the epub just in case so that's why. I have not yet backed up this 'mobi originals' folder onto something else though---I am just backing up my Calibre library for now since I may want to put some other backups on the thumb drive and don't want to run out of room.

So does this sound like enough backing up? If not, what do you recommend?

Me, I toss 'em the keys to the truck, tell them to be careful, don't drink, try not to run over anyone and go have fun. They usually do just fine backing up. :D :D :D

Derek

GhostHawk
03-24-2010, 09:27 AM
Well with the low cost of fairly hefty SD cards you can get a lot of storage for 8 - 10 $.
I don't know how well they stand up over time compared to say a DVD in a good case.

But they do have the advantage of being small, and many devices use an SD slot so you can just drop it in and go.

jduvall
03-25-2010, 06:58 PM
Automatic weekly backups to home server
Automatic monthly back ups to back up server (stored in a different location)
Important files (IE Military files) get backed up once again to a thumb or sd card and that gets store at my safety deposit box

ctol
03-28-2010, 07:50 AM
I generally do a full backup about once week of complete system to 500g external drive.
All of my book files go onto three external harddrives as well as three usb drives, my internal lexar 8g drive, and onto a dvd disk. I will soon begin using dropbox and windows livedrive as well.

HarryT
03-28-2010, 08:21 AM
I've got a NAS RAID array on the home network that most of my PCs use as a backup. My wife and I each have our own "ebook archive" directory on it that we copy stuff to.


Me too; one of the most useful things I've ever bought. I also use mine as a media server for streaming video and music to a set-top box for my TV.

HarryT
03-28-2010, 08:26 AM
Although I've got multiple locations for my ebook files (My Digital Editions, the DRM-stripping directories, the base library for editing (Three loud cheers for Sigil) and finally the Calibre directory) this can't be considered an adequate backup as it all resides on just two disk spindles - laptop hard-drive and and USB 1Tb drive - think what could possibly go wrong...


The only practical method to back up a 1TB drive is onto a second 1TB drive - they are sufficiently cheap now that it's really not an issue to do so, and keep the second drive off-site (I keep mine in my desk drawer at work).

mikaelalind
03-28-2010, 08:52 AM
I do a general backup of my computer, regularly, and my books are included.

Jack Tingle
03-28-2010, 12:25 PM
In re-reading this thread, I realized I hadn't done a good backup of my laptop in a while. (Sigh) I also noticed an empty 4 Gb thumb drive sitting next to the laptop, one of two I bought just because they were cheap, and my wife moves around a lot of photos that run 3-7 Mb each.

Hmmm.

Suffice to say, after a little (Ha!) cleanup, like moving all ebook files to one folder, moving all zips to one folder, moving all photos to one folder, moving all music to one folder, etc. I fit everything on my User account in 3 Gb.

Next step, hooking the external drive to my wife's laptop and saving all her photos. (Aaagh!)

Busily,
Jack Tingle

Bluesman7
03-28-2010, 01:39 PM
I also find backing up to a 4 gig thumb drive convenient (for now). :thumbsup:

cfrizz
03-29-2010, 12:58 PM
Right now I back everything up on a zip disk. I am seriously considering getting a bigger removable HD by Western Digital. That way I can back up both my growing book collection & my music files.

If any of you have any good recommendations for a HD please let me know.

Ea
04-03-2010, 08:39 AM
Now it was my turn.... My harddisk died two days ago :( Thankfully it did it slowly enough for me to get my files from my Time Machine backup (I have/had an iMac) copied to a regular backup disk that's readable from Windows (I've just sold the iMac - want to switch back).

Lost my Calibre library, but that was my own fault :smack: I'm not really sure why I chose not to back that up :smack::smack: Oh, well, I still have all my books.

I lost all my music too, but that was sort of on purpose. I haven't backed it up because I want to start over from a clean slate and rip it again - had music in different qualities and formats.

DJHARKAVY
04-03-2010, 02:02 PM
I have all my books in Calibre... then I have my calibre library in my Dropbox folder.

Dropbox is a sync service that you can install on one or more computers. It keeps copies of everything on multiple computers and one copy on their cloud servers. It is automatic and instant. You don't have to do anything but keep drop box running. Whenever something changes it will get synced with that cloud and other PCs almost instantly.

Dropbox gives you 2GB for free... You can get more (up to 3GB) for free by having others sign up using your referral ID. Or, you can pay a fee to get more space. Your 1GB library would fit fine into the free space.

Thanks for that... I just took up your referral...

pilotbob
04-03-2010, 02:06 PM
Thanks for that... I just took up your referral...

Yep... I just got the Growl notice about it. Thanks very much. I hope you enjoy it as much as I.

BOb

SensualPoet
04-03-2010, 11:19 PM
I've had a home computer since 1981 ... and Apple ][+ that is still the most expensive computer I ever owned. They charged $50 for an extra chip to enable "lower case" -- oooh, ahh! Hard drives? You're kidding, right? The first hard drives for pre-Macintosh computers were 5 MB ... yes, megabytes ... and they wanted around $5,000 for them. But, hey! the 160 KB ... yes, kilobytes ... one sided 5" floppy disk drives ran $750 but you could save money by using a whole punch to make a hole in the floppy square on the other side so you could record on "side b".

So far -- and many computers and O/Ses later -- I have yet to experience a catastrophic failure. And I have not been a religiously anal backup person either.

It's why I love the most recent solution: Rebit for Windows, for around $30; works with Windows 7 and earlier OSes; and is being relaunched as "SaveMe". It stores a backup of your entire system to a dedicated external drive (I have 1 TB) ... in real time. Yes, that Word doc or Excel spreadsheet you've had open for 45 min is backed up. If the entire computer died, the Rebit external drive can be used to regenerate on a fresh computer .. exactly where you left off. It stores multiple versions of files, based on available space and all are accessible with a click or two.

To be doubly sure, I buy a new drive about once a year and start over, putting the old drive safely away in a drawer. A TB these days runs about CDN$120 ... a few cents a day. Between genealogy files, pictures, music files, e-mail and now e-books, the peace of mind I get is ... priceless.

EowynCarter
04-05-2010, 06:57 AM
Well, I have a Synology 107+ NAS, have all my data, ebooks among it.
Every now and then, I plug a second disk and synchronise everything. (So backup disk so it would be safe from power surge).