View Full Version : Did anyone else love their ebook reader at first but start going back to paper?


texasnightowl
03-06-2010, 12:32 AM
I've had my Kindle 1 since August 2008 and really threw myself into and really do like it. I have something like 600 ebooks right now and haven't bought a single dead tree book since (though I did receive one at Christmas).

But...

I'm hitting a little bit of a bump with regards to ebooks. Frustration with formats and DRM and format shifting (for future) and archiving...and so on and so on. It is so much simpler to just buy a book and put it on the shelf.

Then their is pricing and the recent Amazon/Macmillan struggle. Well, pricing in general. I was surfing Amazon today and for many of the books I'm interested in right now they are part of Amazon's 4-3 promotion. So they end up cheaper in DTB format. Example: 4 DTB's in the 4-3 promotion at $7.99 each = $31.96, but one of them would be free so the price would actually be $23.97. The same 4 books for Kindle at (usually) $6.39 each = $25.56. Ok, it's not much of a difference, but still...

I do love being able to carry multiple books with me in my purse via the Kindle; I like being able to download samples; I like some of the freebie books; but given some of my frustrations, when my K1 dies, I'm not sure what I'm going to do.

Anyone else in the same mindset or have these thoughts on occasion? Any suggestions to snap out of it...or not?

Alisa
03-06-2010, 12:38 AM
I prefer the convenience and comfort of ebooks. Paper books annoy me, at least for novels.

banjobama
03-06-2010, 12:41 AM
I still read paper books for school, and they kind of annoy me. I've been spoiled by being able to carry my reader in my purse for a few months now. Having to bring along a big heavy book irritates me.

kindlekitten
03-06-2010, 12:43 AM
almost 2 and a half years with my Kindle and the honeymoon is still going strong!

pilotbob
03-06-2010, 12:56 AM
> Did anyone else love their ebook reader at first but start going back to paper?

No.

BOb

daffy4u
03-06-2010, 12:58 AM
> Did anyone else love their ebook reader at first but start going back to paper?

No.

BOb



What he said. :)

m-reader
03-06-2010, 01:16 AM
> Did anyone else love their ebook reader at first but start going back to paper?

No.

BOb



Ditto. I haven't bought a paper book in 2-3 years (other than kids' books).

lene1949
03-06-2010, 01:33 AM
> Did anyone else love their ebook reader at first but start going back to paper?

No.

BOb



Me neither..

ficbot
03-06-2010, 01:37 AM
It is so much simpler to just buy a book and put it on the shelf.

Maybe easier if you are a rich person with plenty of storage space, no plans to move, and lackeys to pack it all up and schlep it for you if you do have to.

For those of us urban apartment-dwellers whose living room storage os shared between books, DVDs, video games etc. it is *much* easier to buy an ebook, strip the DRM and run it over to a backup drive for posterity...

Nakor
03-06-2010, 01:56 AM
I can imagine myself sticking to paper for non-fiction, but for my fantasy collection? Doubtful.

AprilHare
03-06-2010, 02:12 AM
> Did anyone else love their ebook reader at first but start going back to paper?

No.

BOb



Ditto. Paper is awkward to me.

pilotbob
03-06-2010, 02:13 AM
Ditto. Paper is awkward to me.

as a matter of fact I have a dozen or so pbooks to read and just don't fell like reading them. Although I guess I will some day. Or maybe I'll just get the ebooks... Foundation Trilogy is 3 of them.

BOb

GA Russell
03-06-2010, 02:27 AM
I imagine that the people who have gone back to pbooks no longer post here.

Fringecup
03-06-2010, 02:46 AM
I got my ebook reader in early
December and haven't read a paper book since, although I got one for Christmas which looks very interesting. I think the only books I'll read now in paper versions are ones where color is very important (my Sony doesn't have color) or books of maps, because I find it really hard to look back and forth between the book I'm reading and a map to see where the narrator is talking about. The maps on the ebook are too small and not clear enough for my old eyes!

Billjr13
03-06-2010, 04:24 AM
Not really the most recent DTB I bought was King's Under the Dome in the collector's edition. Before that... I don't remember for sure? maybe something off the bargqin table last summer. For just over a year now.

charleski
03-06-2010, 05:04 AM
No. The space-savings and convenience outweigh any advantage of paper books for anything that doesn't rely on image quality. Price differences that amount to spare-change aren't an issue. I still buy print for photo and design books.

My opinion might be different if I couldn't protect my purchase by stripping the DRM from every book I buy, though. I'd have a hard time buying something that was truly locked-down.

Mathlete
03-06-2010, 05:08 AM
Yeah, I have an ebook reader and I use it every so often for impulsive reading but I still read paper books 90% of the time. This is mainly due to the fact that I'm taking classes, I suppose.

I just don't understand the mentality where some people on these forums see their purchase of an epaper device as a commitment on principle to never read anything other than ebooks for the rest of their lives. It's crazy. It's as if buying a kindle or prs or whatever makes one born again; it's not an appliance so much as a way of life.

You can even detect a certain defensiveness in the responses to this thread toward the suggestion that one could backslide or relapse to paper books. But yeah, I imagine that GA Russell has it right: most who have found that they prefer paper don't stick around Mobileread for very long.

sourcejedi
03-06-2010, 06:46 AM
I just don't understand the mentality where some people on these forums see their purchase of an epaper device as a commitment on principle to never read anything other than ebooks for the rest of their lives.

WP:Sunk costs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunk_costs) :P.

But yeah, I imagine that GA Russell has it right: most who have found that they prefer paper don't stick around Mobileread for very long.[/QUOTE]

+1. I don't read the posts here as being defensive in tone. I do think it's funny people kept feeling it was worth adding their own "No, I didn't" posts, without talking about DRM which was the OPs real point :-).

in answer to that question, there are three options

1. Keep on buying DRM'd books, and DRM readers, from the same source. Assume you can trust them to keep compatible readers in production indefinitely. (Or assume that you won't be annoyed by paying twice for books if you want to read them again in 10 years time).

2. Crack the DRM. (If you don't crack it now, you won't know for sure whether it's possible in the future). That makes you a criminal under EU and US law, and dependent on the continued availability of technology which is suppressed by law. But it is at least physically possible for you to do this with all the major formats right now.

2 b) Grab the books off the darknet (and try to find alternative ways to reimburse your favourite authors). IMO this is morally superior to cracking DRM yourself, but it's more risky (if publishers crack your darknet).

3. Buy only books without DRM. In practice, this currently means p-books + a very restricted selection of e-books. Wait until e-books become more popular, and either the DRM goes away, or a single DRM format becomes dominant enough that you can expect it to remain readable for as long as you like.


I don't see anything wrong with 3). It's just saddening if all this only sinks in _after_ you've bought your e-reader. Hopefully you can afford to chalk it up as a learning experience about technology and markets.

I bought my e-reader because I'd already read so many free e-books online. So it gave me the opportunity / excuse to re-read them on a reflective screen, and download them for archiving purposes. That said, I probably wouldn't have gone ahead if there wasn't also at least one author I was interested in buying, either from Baen's Webscription (which is all DRM-free), or from Fictionwise (which offers less popular books as DRM-free "multi-format").

m-reader
03-06-2010, 06:46 AM
I just don't understand the mentality where some people on these forums see their purchase of an epaper device as a commitment on principle to never read anything other than ebooks for the rest of their lives. It's crazy. It's as if buying a kindle or prs or whatever makes one born again; it's not an appliance so much as a way of life.


I feel I need to clarify my position here - I don't like being bundled into a group you can put a sticker on, not even implicitly.
The reason I have not bought a paper book since I started using e-readers is because I don't feel the need to. As I said, I still buy children picture books because it makes sense to do so.
E-reader covers probably 90% of my reading needs. The hassle of dealing with paper books in the other 10% is something I put up with, but that's about it.

HarryT
03-06-2010, 07:04 AM
I've been reading eBooks for over 25 years. For me, it's not an "either/or" thing - I buy both eBooks and paper books, depending on availability, and what works well in each format. The overwhelming majority of my fiction is eBooks, but almost all my reference books are paper.

Andanzas
03-06-2010, 07:19 AM
I've read 20 books so far this year; only 2 of them were ebooks. Part of the reason is that I've decided not to buy a new reading device until I've read all the books I have sitting on the shelves (well, at least most of them :D ) . Another reason is that I've been reading books not available as ebooks (it's not that easy to find ebooks of reliable quality in my language, Spanish). And my last reason is quite simple: I love books. I am currently reading Light in August in a gorgeus edition by the Library of America and I am enjoying the beauty of every single page.

I am fascinated by these new devices and I am looking forward to see the next releases, but I am also fascinated by books. I hope they never go away; I plan to be surrounded by books all my life.

LDBoblo
03-06-2010, 07:53 AM
If I want to buy a book, I buy it in paper unless it's not available. Ebook reader is fine for novels I don't want to pay for.

Crusader
03-06-2010, 08:16 AM
For me, it's not an "either/or" thing - I buy both eBooks and paper books, depending on availability, and what works well in each format.

:thumbsup:

I completely agree with that and I feel the same way. I still love treebooks just as much as ebooks. Depending on availability and price I will always go for the cheaper and most appropriate option.

If I can find a good 2nd hand copy or a bargain priced book I'll jump at the opportunity to add another book to my physical collection. It's nice to have a bookcase full of treasured books (even if they are only paperbacks) collected throughout the years, and luckily, at this stage I still have ample room for more.

I still read treebooks from the library on a regular basis. Mostly as a gesture of support to the establishment that nurtured my love for reading and as way of discovering new authors or authors I wouldn't necessarily buy.

I love ebooks too. They are more space efficient, often cheaper than the treebook counterpart and convenient (in the cases where you can sidestep the georestriction issue). I really can't say that I prefer any format above the other.

Between my ebook and treebook collections I have reading material to last me a couple of years. Some days it's nice to have a physical book in you hands and on other days my Opus is the weapon of choice. Either way I've got LOADS of reading to catch up on...

thaigreg
03-06-2010, 08:17 AM
Hi,

I've lived overseas since Jan 03 and started using e-books in early 04. Mainly because I can get my favorite authors online,the lack of English titles here, and the libraries here have few current titles and favorite authors. If I was still living in the states I would get most of my books through libraries and purchase a few books at B & N.

Greg
.

GhostHawk
03-06-2010, 08:39 AM
No, but I don't read the latest thriller/Mystery novels either.

I'll never go back to paper.

Bremen Cole
03-06-2010, 08:46 AM
I can't remember the last paper book I bought..... no way would I go back....

Ea
03-06-2010, 08:52 AM
I just don't understand the mentality where some people on these forums see their purchase of an epaper device as a commitment on principle to never read anything other than ebooks for the rest of their lives. It's crazy. It's as if buying a kindle or prs or whatever makes one born again; it's not an appliance so much as a way of life.

*G* I guess you can see it that way - but I think it's 99.99% jest :)

As for myself, I just find my e-book reader so much more convenient and comfortable to read on. I still buy non-fiction p-books, and I've recently bought a few fiction p-books as well - but they're like collector's editions, I want them because I love the books. One of the books I've even scanned and created an e-book from, to have a reading copy. The p-book will stay in my bookcase (of course I didn't scan the new collector's edition - I used my old PB copy so as not to harm the new book ;) ).

njm
03-06-2010, 09:17 AM
I prefer using an ebook reader to reading paper but the availability of books digitally is such that the majority of books I'm reading, I'm still getting out of the library. So I'm still in a transitional state. Availability aside, I still can't justify spending 10-15 or more dollars for something I can check out of the library. But as more older material is getting published digitally, I'll be reading paper less and less, but right now it's that combination of cost and availability stopping me from being all-in.

Graham
03-06-2010, 09:30 AM
I prefer to read the eBook for books that are largely text and will search for that first. In general, paper books are what I get given for Christmas and birthdays...

Graham

Dr. Drib
03-06-2010, 09:32 AM
I'm a book collector and collect First Editions by authors whom I enjoy.

I enjoy handling and reading both from books and from ebook Readers.



Don

kennyc
03-06-2010, 09:35 AM
I've been reading eBooks for over 25 years. For me, it's not an "either/or" thing - I buy both eBooks and paper books, depending on availability, and what works well in each format. The overwhelming majority of my fiction is eBooks, but almost all my reference books are paper.

That's the camp I'm in as well. I bought my Sony 505 last year and then added an Astak PP, A Kindle2 and then a Sony 900. I've since sold the Astak, but use the other three regularly and also do lots of reading in paper form as well either because they are not available in ebook or because there is a major price differential -- most of my paper books I buy used via amazon.

I prefer reading on the ebook reader, but it's not a big deal either way at this point.

amgoforth
03-06-2010, 10:01 AM
I've been reading eBooks for over 25 years. For me, it's not an "either/or" thing - I buy both eBooks and paper books, depending on availability, and what works well in each format. The overwhelming majority of my fiction is eBooks, but almost all my reference books are paper.

Me too, exactly the same.

poohbear_nc
03-06-2010, 12:24 PM
My rule has been: if it's available as an eBook and costs less than $10 (fiction) or $15 (non-fiction) I buy the eBook. I buy pbooks if I'm reading a series and there are holes in the ebook versions. I buy pbooks if there are color photos or maps that don't display well.

Now, if the publisher is playing the delayed availability game, I buy a used copy of the pbook so that none of my money goes to the publisher, and send the publisher a letter to let them know they missed selling the ebook to me, and the amount of money they're not getting from the used pbook sale.

texasnightowl
03-06-2010, 12:25 PM
Maybe easier if you are a rich person with plenty of storage space, no plans to move, and lackeys to pack it all up and schlep it for you if you do have to.

For those of us urban apartment-dwellers whose living room storage os shared between books, DVDs, video games etc. it is *much* easier to buy an ebook, strip the DRM and run it over to a backup drive for posterity...

Well, I am an urban apartment-dweller. And I am at a point where I don't necessarily find it easier to buy, strip, convert (sometimes), and archive. But in my case part of that may be that when I get home from work I don't really want to touch a computer for the most part. There are numerous days when I get home that I don't even sit down at my PC to retrieve email. Yeah, dtb storage is an issue. I donated bags and bags and bags of books last year to Goodwill...and I'm still low on physical space (though I do have enough space to double stack some books right now).

texasnightowl
03-06-2010, 12:25 PM
I imagine that the people who have gone back to pbooks no longer post here.

Yeah, you are most likely right. Thanks.

texasnightowl
03-06-2010, 12:37 PM
+1. I don't read the posts here as being defensive in tone. I do think it's funny people kept feeling it was worth adding their own "No, I didn't" posts, without talking about DRM which was the OPs real point :-).

Yeah, I was a little discouraged when several of the initial posts didn't even recognize the issues that I'm a little depressed over. I mean yeah, I guess my title question was a little simplistic and a Yes/No answer was entirely valid, but...


in answer to that question, there are three options

1. Keep on buying DRM'd books, and DRM readers, from the same source.
2. Crack the DRM.
2 b) Grab the books off the darknet
3. Buy only books without DRM.

I don't see anything wrong with 3). It's just saddening if all this only sinks in _after_ you've bought your e-reader. Hopefully you can afford to chalk it up as a learning experience about technology and markets.



I'm already into option 2 and have started use of Calibre so I don't have to worry about option 1. Am I frustrated at the moment about having to do so? Yes. :rolleyes:

Don't get me wrong here...I don't plan to (at least at the moment) entirely give up ebooks. Now when the K1 dies, who knows. But with new devices and prices going down all the time I would probably buy some sort of inexpensive device to support any ebooks I already have. But even for my fiction novels I am going to re-evaluate a bit on what I buy in paper and what I buy in ebook.

texasnightowl
03-06-2010, 12:43 PM
I've been reading eBooks for over 25 years. For me, it's not an "either/or" thing - I buy both eBooks and paper books, depending on availability, and what works well in each format. The overwhelming majority of my fiction is eBooks, but almost all my reference books are paper.

:thumbsup:

I completely agree with that and I feel the same way. I still love treebooks just as much as ebooks. Depending on availability and price I will always go for the cheaper and most appropriate option.
...
It's nice to have a bookcase full of treasured books (even if they are only paperbacks) collected throughout the years, and luckily, at this stage I still have ample room for more.
...
I love ebooks too. ... I really can't say that I prefer any format above the other.
...
Some days it's nice to have a physical book in you hands and on other days my Opus is the weapon of choice. Either way I've got LOADS of reading to catch up on...

I'm a book collector and collect First Editions by authors whom I enjoy.

I enjoy handling and reading both from books and from ebook Readers.

Don


Thanks guys...I'm feeling a little less like a traitor for my thoughts of partially going back to paper. ;)

bgalbrecht
03-06-2010, 12:52 PM
2. Crack the DRM. (If you don't crack it now, you won't know for sure whether it's possible in the future). That makes you a criminal under EU and US law, and dependent on the continued availability of technology which is suppressed by law. But it is at least physically possible for you to do this with all the major formats right now.

2 b) Grab the books off the darknet (and try to find alternative ways to reimburse your favourite authors). IMO this is morally superior to cracking DRM yourself, but it's more risky (if publishers crack your darknet).


I know this is getting off topic, but I think that if you don't make your stripped and converted books public, 2) is morally superior than 2b) because you're definitely compensating the author and even though it's not legally viewed this way, I consider it a fair-use of format-shifting, analogous to me buying a CD and ripping it to my mp3 player.

Back to the topic.

I've been reading ebooks on my PDA and computer for at least 3-4 years now, and I just bought a nook because I didn't think that I'd be buying paper books any more. I used to buy at least 30-50 paper books a year (many of them used), and for the last year or so, I don't think I've purchased any paper books that weren't for scanning for Distributed Proofreaders.

catsittingstill
03-06-2010, 01:04 PM
The rest of my life is fairly plain vanilla, but about books I am openly poly. :-)

I love my Kindle (read 3 books on it in two days last week). Its crisp display--its wireless access to the internet--its window on a bookstore I don't need to travel to reach--it's the perfect magic book. I love my iPod Touch's "handful of glowing jewels" LCD screen--the books are free from Gutenberg, the Touch fits in my pocket and goes everywhere with me, the backlight makes it perfect for reading under the covers, and when my eyes get tired, that reminds me to turn it off and go to sleep. And I love my old paper books and frequently reread them, and buy new paper books by preference for items where I need a large format or large color illustrations--woodworking books and graphic novels pop to mind.

How fortunate I am that none of these beloveds are jealous of the others!

Sweetpea
03-06-2010, 01:23 PM
as a matter of fact I have a dozen or so pbooks to read and just don't fell like reading them. Although I guess I will some day. Or maybe I'll just get the ebooks... Foundation Trilogy is 3 of them.

BOb

I know what you mean...


For me, if the ebook is available and easy to read on my ereader, I'll not read the pbook version. So, this includes almost all novels. For study or reference material, I still prefer the pbook.

Sydney's Mom
03-06-2010, 01:51 PM
I have been reading ebooks since I got my Kindle 11/08. The convenience is making me love it more and more. I still order pbooks from the library if the publisher windows it (I can usually get it within a month), but it takes me a long time to read it, because I won't lug it back and forth, I will only read it at home.

kovidgoyal
03-06-2010, 02:29 PM
What are paper books?

Hamlet53
03-06-2010, 07:42 PM
For me it comes down to what sort of book is in question and how long I want to keep it:

Books that are graphic heavy, especially color graphics, or contain a lot of tables and formulas.


If I only want it short term I will get it in paper from the library.

If I want it in my permanent library I will buy it in paper.





Books that are straight text or only B&W graphics.


If it is available in ebook format in public domain I'll get that obviously.

If I want a permanent copy, it is available in ebook format, at a cost I will buy the ebook format and strip the DRM so I will always be able to view it now and in the future.

If I don't want a permanent copy and it is in ebook format from my library I will get it there.

If it is not available from my library as an ebook I will get from the library in paper.



So I guess the bottom line is the only paper books I will buy are books with color graphics that I want to own permanently. Other then that my choice is an ebook.

Ea
03-06-2010, 07:52 PM
Yeah, I was a little discouraged when several of the initial posts didn't even recognize the issues that I'm a little depressed over. I mean yeah, I guess my title question was a little simplistic and a Yes/No answer was entirely valid, but...
Sorry. I guess that issue didn't show through enough in your post to register with me. I AM personally quite annoyed with DRM and geographic restrictions. The DRM I habitually strip from any books I buy, but as for geo restrictions I just don't buy if I can't and find a library book, or a PD e-book, to read instead. Or something else. The original reason I started to read e-books, was that I read fiction off the 'Net - it was great to be able to not have to read it of the monitor.

mollybo
03-06-2010, 07:54 PM
I've read maybe two or three paper books in the past two years, and a few reference books (like one on trusts I got a few weeks back - not available in ebook format, of course). I just find the paper books annoying at this point - I have to use two hands, can't read in the dark, have to keep turning pages, easily lose my place, etc. etc. etc.

I love ebooks.

SimonSays
03-06-2010, 11:14 PM
I still buy plenty of paperback books- actually have just purchased about 5-7 this weekend. I don't think I will ever give up buying paperbacks

Boston
03-07-2010, 12:15 AM
Although not due to desire or intent, I am going back to paper more and more. If you told me a year ago this would be the case, I would've said you were crazy.

The reason is simply because e-book prices have gone up...
- A larger percentage of new releases are now over $9.99
- A larger percentage are within $1 of the discounted paperback price. (I refuse to pay paper prices for ebooks as they can't be passed along).

So I hold off purchasing until the e-book is less than $10 and is at least $1 off the discounted paper price.

While waiting for the ebook price to drop, I often find the paper version goes bargain priced or can be found on the secondary market (in new/like new condition). That's if I don't lose interest in the meantime.

...when the paper version drops well below the ebook price -or- vice versa, I buy whichever is cheaper. I think I'm probably now buying more paper than ebooks.

So the paper doesn't pile up, I'm trying to discipline my behavior by reading paper books on the weekends when I am home and ebooks during the week.

Dopedangel
03-07-2010, 07:09 AM
I read mostly fiction and to me the story is important not what I am reading on. I would never go back to reading on paper as they to me are cumbersome unless I really wanted to read a book and had no way to get it in ebook including the darknet
I used to buy books from old book shops and thrift stores
and have had books break up on me.

Gogolo
03-07-2010, 07:37 AM
When it comes to serious work with a book, memorizing, anotating - for me a paper book is still the best thing. It has a real unique presence, smell and reflects the process of working with. I have relationships with books that I've read a long time ago. They reflect also a part of my development. Epaper is not able to those things in any way. Its good for other things, database functions, searchable etc.
When I realize that a book is important for me, I buy it as a paper book.

kennyc
03-07-2010, 07:38 AM
....
I used to buy books from old book shops and thrift stores
and have had books break up on me.

I hate it when that happens!

:(

Kevin2960
03-07-2010, 07:49 AM
My Eyesight is failing, Badly, give up the ability to READ easily .......

Or Shoot Myself in the Head :eek: ???

NO WAY

Are You Mad :rofl: ?

Ilkyway
03-07-2010, 08:22 AM
Hello, I am totally new to ebooks. My mother has shone me her ebook reader in the Febrary and has infactet me with it. My days a so pact with different tasks and I allways loose my bookmarks so that I found reading paperbooks very unkompftable lately.
But with the e-reader I could do all the stuff I have to and allways pick the book up, where I left it. Even reading more than one book in a time is no problem. But, and that is a problem what I have not solved jet: I love to by books. I love walking through a bookstore picking one book up, runnig my fingers throug it, reading the backcover, looking at how the book is made... picking up another... this is something I miss with e-books. And asstonishing as it is to me: many ebookstores that I found so far, don`t even show the describtion of the book. So I find myselve going to amazon just so that I can read, what the book is all about.
Long talk short story: I love ebooks for many reasons, but I think the book is not dead jet, not for me anyway.
Ilkyway

ficbot
03-07-2010, 11:19 AM
I still buy cookbooks and non-fiction in paper, just to clarify :) My paper book space is taken up by that. Fiction, I buy in ebook.

WT Sharpe
03-07-2010, 11:34 AM
I've been reading eBooks for over 25 years. For me, it's not an "either/or" thing - I buy both eBooks and paper books, depending on availability, and what works well in each format. The overwhelming majority of my fiction is eBooks, but almost all my reference books are paper.

I don't generally read books at my PC, but I devour them on my reader. I'm pretty much spoiled rotten by the ease and convenience of e-readers. I still read paper books, but only when those books aren't available in an electronic format or when an electronic format isn't suitable for the book in question.

WT Sharpe
03-07-2010, 11:44 AM
When it comes to serious work with a book, memorizing, anotating - for me a paper book is still the best thing. It has a real unique presence, smell and reflects the process of working with. I have relationships with books that I've read a long time ago. They reflect also a part of my development. Epaper is not able to those things in any way. Its good for other things, database functions, searchable etc.
When I realize that a book is important for me, I buy it as a paper book.

I find copying and annotating text is a breeze on my Kindle. Before I had one, whenever I wanted to quote a passage from a book I had to painstakingly type it out word by word. Now I just copy the entire passage and import it to a word processor.

imaredr
03-07-2010, 01:06 PM
Since the time I bought my first reader (Rocket Ebook Reader) in 2000, I have not bought one paper novel. If it isn't in digital form, I will not buy it.

Ellen

MattW
03-07-2010, 05:16 PM
Honestly?

I still prefer paper books - it's not even close. I've had my PRS-505 for two years now and I really like it. I've used it extensively on a year-long backpacking trip around the world, where every gram counts. For travelling, there's simply no better way to carry a large number of books around. I still carry it with me on all shorter and longer trips I take.

I'm not going into the "real books just *feel* different" argument - it's just that I think that the current technology is not yet good enough to give me the same reading experience on a display that I have with paper. I vastly prefer e-ink over LCD, but, IMHO, before we need color we need white that is actually, you know, *white* and black that is black.

I am amazed at the lack of quality of American mass-market paperbacks - sure, they are cheap, but, boy, do they look ugly. E-Ink isn't that much worse, but since I mostly read hardcovers and trade paperbacks, contrast is important to me.

While I won't be throwing my PRS-505 away any time soon, I'm still waiting for the next big step in display technology. And while I like the idea of Sony's touch screen readers, I'm simply not going to settle for a display that's even worse.

Matthias

Ea
03-07-2010, 05:26 PM
I am amazed at the lack of quality of American mass-market paperbacks - sure, they are cheap, but, boy, do they look ugly. E-Ink isn't that much worse, but since I mostly read hardcovers and trade paperbacks, contrast is important to me.
I recently bought a hardback - so-called "collector's edition" - of a book I liked. What it boils down to is, I guess, the normal hard-cover in a slipcase and with the authors's signature, but anyhow... I knew paperback was bad, but I think this is the first time I've bought an English language hardcover book, and I was quite disappointed. Thin paper and tiny margins. If I compare it with a few recent Danish trade paperback I own, it loses hands down (trade paperback is hardcover quality printing with a soft cover). Overall quality seems to be going down, also for hardback/trade paperback.

fugazied
03-07-2010, 05:27 PM
I still go back to paper every now and then but it's only because publishers force me to with slow releases of e-books and some ridiculous pricing issues.

I do prefer e-readers now though.

dkb
03-07-2010, 07:27 PM
Except for two books for my book club that I couldn't legally get in e-book form, all my fiction and nonfiction purchases since I got my reader 2 yrs. ago have been e-books. I still buy kid's books, cookbooks, and reference books in print.

I have considered buying the Demy Kitchen Safe Touchscreen Recipe Reader to replace my cookbooks, but the mechanism for getting recipes on the device is unsatisfactory at this time.

Critteranne
03-07-2010, 08:17 PM
I still buy plenty of paperback books- actually have just purchased about 5-7 this weekend. I don't think I will ever give up buying paperbacks

I don't even want to count the paperbacks I bought this week. :D Most were used, and almost all of the rest were bought with a discount. Some I bought in paper because they were cheaper that way (sigh). Some I bought in paper because they weren't in e-book format yet. Some I bought in paper because they were there. ;)

I even bought a hardback thriller. :smack: But I had a 40% off coupon, and I checked the reviews first to make sure other readers liked it. The reviews were good (which is rare for thrillers), meaning either it's really good or the author has lots of friends on Amazon.

Hellmark
03-08-2010, 01:08 AM
For me, I've bought exactly one book for pleasure reading since I got my ebook reader, which I then proceeded to get a ebook copy of. End result, I read the book, and the paper copy is still untouched.

Still buy paper when it comes to my school books. The myriad of formats and DRM types make it not worthwhile to go ebook there.

Tattncat
03-08-2010, 01:41 AM
Did anyone else love their ebook reader at first but start going back to paper?

No, aside from the cost issue (I read a lot of PD & CC works) room to store the books and overall convenience outstrip DTB any day. Since we will be travelling and away from home approx 8 months out of twelve living in a Motor Home space and ease of purchasing/downloading becomes even more of an issue.

I am not likely to be purchasing a DTB in the near future unless it's a Collection book.

_paul_
03-08-2010, 04:43 AM
Realized, that I can't to read paper books since bought my Pocket Book 301. Love my old bookshelves with favorite books, but all the same e-reader more convenient.
Most listen audiobooks.

robkat
03-08-2010, 04:44 AM
Could not store all the Ebooks I possess in paper form.
No intention of going back to paper.

Solicitous
03-08-2010, 04:48 AM
Well...I still buy all my uni text books as the paper version (most are not available by ebook, and secondly during open book exams electronic devices are not permitted).

With my actual reading for pleasure, since having my ereader I have read one paperback (which I already had on my shelf). To be honest I prefer reading on my ereader. It is easy to hold, isn't heavy or difficult to hold like a paperback (most of my pbooks are 600+ pages). That said I do have a few book series that I will buy the rest of in pbook form.

basschick
03-08-2010, 06:03 AM
for me, reading is a big part of my lifestyle. i generally prefer ebooks due to convenience, immediate gratification and space issues - our bookcases are packed 2 levels deep and there is no more room. i also prefer the lightness of my cybook - it's lighter and easier to read than many paperbacks and all hardbacks. i will buy a pbook if i really want to read it because i can't get all of a particular author or series in ebooks. pbooks are imo also better for illustrated books.

FlorenceArt
03-08-2010, 06:51 AM
I still read a lot of paper books, but not because of DRM, although it is an issue.

I have no particular love for paper books, though some French paperbacks are beautiful objects. American books, in whatever form, I'm afraid I find extremely ugly. English ones are better, but I prefer the French design :)

To me, the only advantage of paper books is that they are reliable. They don't hang or need any power source. And though they do break up sometimes or have pages missing, it hasn't happened to me often, in fact it's very rare in my experience. Unfortunately my Cybook has big problems and I cannot be sure it will start when I hit the Power button. I have been a bit traumatized by that, so at the moment I don't leave home without a paper book in my bag.

Other than the above, I read paper books because :
- I am re-reading a paper book I already had
- there is no e-book version
- there is no reasonably priced e-book version

Since cases 1 and 2 are very frequent with French books, at the moment I read English language books mostly in e-form, and French language books mostly in paper form.

I also have to admit I have a problem with the format French e-books are mostly sold in, namely ePub with Adobe DRM. I don't like it, and I haven't figured out how to remove the DRM yet. That is also a reason I haven't bought any French-language e-books (the English language ones I buy in Mobi format and remove the DRM). But I guess I will have to deal with that problem sooner or later, so I only see it as temporary.

Maggie May
03-08-2010, 07:43 AM
I'm still in love with my Cybook as much as I ever was. However, I have bought the occasional paperback, but only when the hated geographic restriction prevented me from buying the eBook.

Slan
Mag.

sony_fox
03-08-2010, 07:56 AM
The reason why I still buy pbooks is bookshops. I love bookshops, and brousing amoungst shelves, finding chance possabilites and interesting sounding/looking books, reading a few pages here and there, that I'd never have thought to search for. I hate online shopping. It's good if you know your store and have a specific product in mind, but for anything else especially serendipitous finds it is horrible. Hence I don't expect to ever stop buying pbooks.

And of course availablity - many older books will never make it into ebook versions.

Reading pbooks - always feels odd after the ebook version. I still prefer the 505 almost a year on it's just more convenient and a nicer reading experience. However I'm not rebuying all the starts of series I own in pbook, and I often enjoy re-reading old favourites. So I do still read pbooks too. Plus of course those impulsive bookshop aquisitions.

mbovenka
03-08-2010, 08:27 AM
I still buy plenty of paperback books- actually have just purchased about 5-7 this weekend. I don't think I will ever give up buying paperbacks

That's interesting; paperbacks are exactly what I *don't* buy anymore. I don't buy many pbooks anymore period (down from 50+ a year), but the few I do buy are hardcovers.

Last was the complete Annotated Sherlock Holmes. Absolutely glorious :-)

Lemurion
03-08-2010, 11:12 AM
I've been reading ebooks for years - I bought my first portable reading device (an iPaq) about five years ago. I went from the iPaq to a Palm T|X and then to a Sony Reader and now I've added a Droid.

When I bought the Sony Reader, I stopped buying mass market paperback fiction. I still buy hardcovers and graphic novels, but not mass market paperbacks.

I still buy books - I don't think I will ever stop buying paper books - but most of my fiction is now electronic, especially the "disposable" kind that you only ever read once and have no need to keep.

solitarywolf
03-08-2010, 04:35 PM
I love books. I love shopping for books. I love collecting books. I also love carrying my Sony Reader with me everywhere I don't like carrying my books with me.

Sometimes I will read the E version while out and when I get home, switch to the hardcover edition. The Sony Reader library allows me to search where I am in the book and finding where I am in the book is easy.

I am die-hard fan of my Reader and am very proud of my collection of books I have on my shelf.

-Seth Williams,
San Francisco, CA

ellenoc
03-08-2010, 05:16 PM
I haven't bought a paper book since I got my Kindle two years ago. I do read paper books because my book budget can't satisfy my appetite for reading, so I still use the library.

jseay
03-08-2010, 05:48 PM
I've probably bought hundreds of pbooks over the years. They flooded the closets and tables all over my house. I just recently donated many of them to the local library. We had to make space in our home, so I had to part with my pbooks.

I am planning on purchasing a dedicated ereader device in the near future and making the switch to ebooks. I was very impressed with the e ink screen on the Nook when I toyed around with it at Barnes and Noble. Seems like a pleasant way to read ebooks (as opposed to reading on a LCD screen).

I'm hoping the switch to ebooks will save money (lower cost ebooks) as well as space. However, I realize that not every book I will want to read will be available as an ebook or will be practical to read as an ebook.

Blue Tyson
03-09-2010, 02:39 AM
Not a chance.

hansl
03-09-2010, 07:26 AM
Agnostic of any ebook formats, I loved the device initially until I learned that PDF is not really supported as it is layout-centric. So I spent most of my time for it with format conversion tricks. This was an interesting and sometimes rewarding learning phase. But in the end the handling of the PRS-500 was too clumsy (no search, no commenting, no reasonable keyboard replacement, bad navigation, battery consuming stand-by mode, display too grey for my taste) and I didn't want to spend more money on such devices before they are mature i.e. art-book-capable, much more comfortably usable and cheaper. So in theory I was set for reading paperback-like ebooks but actually had lost the fun reading with it.

Then there was a phase with the Nintendo DS Lite (without camera) on which I could read non-DRMed epubs, but the display resolution was too bad for long reading.

Currently I'm reading copyright free Gutenberg etc. books on my cellphone with the Mobipocket reader and keep my hands off converting anything but epub to prc (and only if really necessary, but I don't know of an epub reader for Symbian S60 5th generation - touch screen edititon).

This is fun and most of the dead tree books I read are not available as ebooks. Also, I hardly buy new paperbacks. I'm also not buying DRMed ebooks because I'm not sure this is a good idea since Amazon rolled over Mobipocket and I don't have an iPhone.

My stock of unread paper books is large but going back to paper on the long run - NO, although the unlimited joy fo reading ebooks without any obstacles has not yet arrived.

Hansl

GeoffC
03-09-2010, 07:33 AM
> Did anyone else love their ebook reader at first but start going back to paper?

No.

BOb




I could not put it better !


Yes, Okay there are annoyances, Geo Restriction being the main one - BUT there are plenty of books in an electronic version to enjoy....

But I have (yet) to see a device (that I would like) that can adequately replace many non-fiction books that I like ...

d.culloch
03-09-2010, 10:32 AM
I have being reading ebooks for the last two years. I have modern writers and the not so modern writers on my reader. I occassionaly buy colour print pbooks.

After two years I now know why I prefer ebooks over pbooks and that is that I love searching through Feed Books and other such sites that have bygone authors who I have not heard of before.

So for me the ebook has opened up another world of authors that I am pretty sure I would not have discovered by going to a book shop.

Ravensknight
03-09-2010, 11:27 AM
I'm still in transition. I have about 1000 books of fantasy, scifi with another 1500 of non-fiction and "other" [mainly my wife's]. I've been darknetting most of what I already own.

and I belong to the SFBC. I love hardcovers :-) they just take up too much space. and in a condo, space is premium!

but the only time I read a pbook is when I see a new release at the library...

mikemc2
03-09-2010, 08:30 PM
I've only purchased one pbook (James Ellroy's "Blood's A Rover") since getting my Sony 505 last September and only because there was no ebook available. I received a paperback novel from my Secret Santa at work and that's it. I tend to have several books going at once and it's nice to have them all in one convenient package.

BearMountainBooks
03-10-2010, 08:01 PM
I've had my Kindle 1 since August 2008 and really threw myself into and really do like it. I have something like 600 ebooks right now and haven't bought a single dead tree book since (though I did receive one at Christmas).

But...

I'm hitting a little bit of a bump with regards to ebooks. Frustration with formats and DRM and format shifting (for future) and archiving...and so on and so on. It is so much simpler to just buy a book and put it on the shelf.

Then their is pricing and the recent Amazon/Macmillan struggle. Well, pricing in general. I was surfing Amazon today and for many of the books I'm interested in right now they are part of Amazon's 4-3 promotion. So they end up cheaper in DTB format. Example: 4 DTB's in the 4-3 promotion at $7.99 each = $31.96, but one of them would be free so the price would actually be $23.97. The same 4 books for Kindle at (usually) $6.39 each = $25.56. Ok, it's not much of a difference, but still...

I do love being able to carry multiple books with me in my purse via the Kindle; I like being able to download samples; I like some of the freebie books; but given some of my frustrations, when my K1 dies, I'm not sure what I'm going to do.

Anyone else in the same mindset or have these thoughts on occasion? Any suggestions to snap out of it...or not?

I e-read or buy paper--depending on the price. I've yet to pay more for an ebook if I can buy a used copy cheaper. Now, I can see the day it might happen--for convenience or instant gratification (gotta read NOW) but I do use Amazon's 4 for 3 a lot...which means not getting it in ebooks. Now if those prices were 1.99 or whatever, I'd just get the ebook.

It's actually kind of frustrating to have to bother with a regular book when I find an ebook that is priced too high...but I'll read whatever format!

Harmon
03-11-2010, 01:05 AM
I never stopped reading pbooks. I just shifted some of my pbook reading to the ebook version. What I'm finding, over time, is that my pbook reading tends to be non-fiction, and my ebook reading, fiction. Not entirely, though - the two ebooks I'm reading now on my iPhone Kindle app are both non-fiction, albeit somewhat lightweight - one is This Book is Overdue, about being a librarian, and the other is The Cello Suites, about the author's encounter with Bach & Pablo Casals. (What's cool about this is that I can listen to the suites while reading the book, anywhere I am! The book is organized to parallel the movements of each suite.)

One book I am reading in paper because it's not available in digits is The Year's Work in Lebowski Studies. I have that at work & sneak in a few pages now & then. It's a very awkward book to hold, and would work much better on my ereader.

These days I spend most of my reading time on my Sony 300/505 with Instapaper articles. But my bedtime book is a diary written by a Jew in Nazi Germany (I Shall Bear Witness, by Victor Klemperer), and my dining room table book is a small book on economics by Jane Jacobs.

I think what's happened to me is that my serious reading is still in paper, but my entertainment, whether fiction or non-fiction, is digital whenever available. I don't think that this is because the serious stuff isn't available electronically. I think it has something to do with the physicality of pbooks, but I really haven't figured out why that should be.

I read a lot of magazines, in paper, but when I get my iPad I expect to migrate all my subscriptions except the food magazines to digital.

The bottom line for me is that paper and digital are not an either/or. They are a both/and.

Gogolo
03-11-2010, 01:30 AM
I think it has something to do with the physicality of pbooks, but I really haven't figured out why that should be.

I have the feeling I can memorize better with pbooks. It would be interesting to investigate this in a study. I think the more different information available (grip, different look of pages, position of the book in a room, smell etc.) the better the memorizing.

Nakor
03-11-2010, 02:15 AM
I think it might have something to do with the fact that it's a bit easier to mark pages, flip back and forth, skim for the parts you're interested in, or even just scan up and down a single page you're reading through with a physical book than with a digital one. None of that is terribly important for the vast majority of fiction, but for non-fiction works it's handy to be able to jump about.

Victoria
03-11-2010, 07:16 AM
I've had my sony reader for 2 years & much prefer ebooks to paper. I used to have a steady stream of pbooks coming in the mail, but rarely buy them now, unless they are art books, magazines, or say a computer manual, where illustration is central. I hope to convert entirely when the iPad takes off.

I am now bothered by many things about paper books that I didn't notice before. My art books are beautiful, but very heavy, and give me a crick in my neck. The cheap paper of paperbacks dry out my hands. Holding stiff books open puts pressure on an arthritic thumb. Plus there is the whole issue of storage. I'm like the princess sleeping a pea in her mattress - a complete conversion can't come soon enough.

omk3
03-11-2010, 07:36 AM
I try to avoid paper books completely.

Room is a major consideration. My house in Greece is still full of books (though I've given away a full carful of them...). I divide my life between different countries and different houses, and have to move rather frequently. Carting loads of books around, especially with the speed I read, is a major problem.

Secondly, I'm spoiled by the extra options the readers offer. Suddenly I hate it when it's difficult to keep a thick paper book open, and I have more than once tried to double click a word to see its definition :D Funny the things you take for granted for a lifetime, and then suddenly they start to annoy you...

But I still like going to bookstores and browsing. Only now, instead of leaving with tens of newly purchased books under my arms, I leave empty-handed. That feels strange.

Ea
03-11-2010, 07:57 AM
Secondly, I'm spoiled by the extra options the readers offer. Suddenly I hate it when it's difficult to keep a thick paper book open, and I have more than once tried to double click a word to see its definition :D Funny the things you take for granted for a lifetime, and then suddenly they start to annoy you...
Exactly! And the print in p-books now seem so small and hard to read (and it's not beacuse I need new glasses). Even if the contrast on an e-ink screen could be a little better, the whole experience of an e-book reader still affords too many conveniences compared with paper.

texasnightowl
03-11-2010, 12:02 PM
... flip back and forth, skim for the parts you're interested in...

This I definitely agree with. There are often times I remember some word or passage from a book that I want to re-read and in DTB format I usually remember about how far thru the book it was or what surrounded it. I know that the kindle, and other readers, have search functions, but sometimes you don't remember an exact word that was used...sometimes you just remember the scenario or context and flipping thru a paperback/hardback is easier in this case than trying to figure out where it was in the ebook form.

tomsem
03-11-2010, 02:46 PM
I have a stack of books that I have not touched since getting a Kindle. I've purchased a few more, but these have all been books with lots of graphics. For those that are just text, there's no question that I prefer the ebook version for its convenience. It's true that you can't easily 'flip through' an ebook to find a passage (especially given the low page refresh rates of current e-ink readers), but I find that text search is usually more efficient and powerful than this anyway, at least on Kindle.

I've never been one to mark up or highlight books or take notes, but if I were, I probably wouldn't like ebooks as much, at least as they exist today. Kindle has annotation features, but I think these need to be developed more before they represent a replacement for, or improvement over, paper-based annotation. For example, it needs to be easier to share book notes with other people, across different reading platforms. Wouldn't it be cool to be able to 'overlay' some literary critic's (or the author's, or a friend's) commentary with the book you're reading? Or to create these for others? sort of like directors' commentary tracks on DVDs...

We're still in the infancy of electronic books. I trust they will continue to evolve and move beyond the metaphor of 'book' and bring us new ways of navigating the info-sphere and connecting with each other.

Hamlet53
03-11-2010, 03:52 PM
One additional thought inspired by Ebook Week. Given all the free titles available (especially on Smashwords!) I've been downloading just about anything that looks like it might be interesting. Now for the paper book equivalent, say a huge box of paperback books given away free, the job of sorting and culling later is a lot easier. Just a glance at the front and back cover informs me what the book is about and why it interested me at all. When I look at a list of ebook files in a folder on my hard drive not much information to go by there.

Not that his has changed my opinion on my preference for ebooks versus pbooks. The other side of the coin is that in a few days of sitting with my morning coffee at my computer monitor I snagged probably a least a hundred intriguing titles.

Jelena
03-12-2010, 09:40 AM
As for my experience - I even quit reading ebooks from monitor.

Now I buy or download e-books that looks interesting for me, read it, and if there is something really exciting - then I buy hardcover.
I also buy books with illustrations - photoalbums etc (as a photographer).
My son who is 9 yo, also reads his books from my PocketBook 301 - we are downloading lots of adventures and fantasy for him. I think about model for him - to stop fighting :)

junkyardwillie
03-12-2010, 03:29 PM
I've found myself wishing for a better device to read on, something that would allow for color like a tablet with a PixelQi screen but I haven't went back to paper. I'm finding that my reading amount is starting to slow down because of frustration with my Irex devices. I don't want to go back to paper but I need something more than what eInk can provide right now.

CCDMan
03-12-2010, 05:28 PM
No Way. I have stopped buying paper almost totally except for books that require lots of graphics. Since I ordered an iPad today, that also may stop.

Lemurion
03-14-2010, 01:29 PM
The last book I read was on my phone.

I still like my Sony a lot, but I'm finding that the portability of my Droid makes it much more desirable for reading in short bursts.

I'm still having difficulty with paper though ;)

leebase
03-15-2010, 01:13 AM
When I look at a list of ebook files in a folder on my hard drive not much information to go by there.

Have you considered using Calibre for managing your books? You can have book covers -- put your on tags etc. That way you have a lot more information than just the file name.

Also, fwiw, I keep my own "to be read" list updated. Right now I have about 80 some odd books on it. Whenever I get a new ebook (bought or free) -- I place it SOMEWHERE on my list and sometimes with a "why am I interested in this book" type comment.

Example: http://docs.google.com/Doc?docid=0AZYkunZpK9UZZGRjenJoZGRfNTRjZHAzcDhjZA&hl=en

I find it helps me to consider up front where a particular book would fall in my reading plan -- because many times I'll think "I'll never get around to reading this book" and therefore don't bother buying it or even downloading it for free.

Lee

leebase
03-15-2010, 01:16 AM
My preferred device is my iPhone. But I still check out books from my library. I don't consider that "going back" to reading paper. I simply prefer to read books on my iPhone and read paper versions when I either can't get an ebook version or would have to pay for it when the library is free.

I'm getting an iPad as well -- but feel no compulsion to use it exclusively and never reading paper books.

Lee

hnoto
03-15-2010, 02:40 AM
as a matter of fact I have a dozen or so pbooks to read and just don't feel like reading them. Although I guess I will some day. Or maybe I'll just get the ebooks...

BOb


Me too.

doreenjoy
03-15-2010, 03:40 AM
No. I find e-reading much easier than p-reading. I have over a hundred p-books on my TBR pile, and I'm gradually replacing them with e-books and tossing the paper.

Franky
03-15-2010, 05:14 AM
I recently bought a PRS505 and I let my wife read a book. since then she doesn't give it back. so, I have to buy another reader. I find ereading fantastic. We love the PRS505, but we definitely will buy a larger device. Unfortunately a lot of new coming devices are delayed. It looks we're going for the Irex DR800SG. The only problem I have is that a lot of books are only in paper. We read only German. Maybe that's the problem.

LDBoblo
03-15-2010, 06:31 AM
I am still hoping to make a more complete move to ebooks one day. I will completely switch from novels when the ebook versions look less like garbage. Paper will probably always have its place, but I'll be happy to move all my recreational reading to ebook format once the quality comes up enough and the readers are decent. That may still be years away, but I'm hopeful.

Steven Lake
03-15-2010, 05:05 PM
Well, I'm gonna toss in my 2c and say that ebooks are nice, but I just can't get past the way they look and feel. I'm still very much one to pick up a physical book and prefer reading that. Yeah, that'll likely get me shot being that this is an ebook site. But don't start pulling triggers yet. I haven't said I'd never do it, but merely that I don't prefer them. As the technology improves that'll likely change. But not for the time being. Plus having a paper book allows me to sit back and completely unplug, especially given that I deal with tech all day, every day. So reading a paperback is my little way of unplugging for a while.

WT Sharpe
03-15-2010, 05:36 PM
Well, I'm gonna toss in my 2c and say that ebooks are nice, but I just can't get past the way they look and feel. I'm still very much one to pick up a physical book and prefer reading that. Yeah, that'll likely get me shot being that this is an ebook site. But don't start pulling triggers yet. I haven't said I'd never do it, but merely that I don't prefer them. As the technology improves that'll likely change. But not for the time being. Plus having a paper book allows me to sit back and completely unplug, especially given that I deal with tech all day, every day. So reading a paperback is my little way of unplugging for a while.

Don't worry, no one here will shoot you. We all realize that people have different tastes and differing opinions, and that's OK. Everyone is entitled to their own thoughts and preferences.

Yours just happen to be wrong. :p

:rofl:

(:jk:)

kennyc
03-15-2010, 05:45 PM
Well, I'm gonna toss in my 2c and say that ebooks are nice, but I just can't get past the way they look and feel. I'm still very much one to pick up a physical book and prefer reading that. Yeah, that'll likely get me shot being that this is an ebook site. But don't start pulling triggers yet. I haven't said I'd never do it, but merely that I don't prefer them. As the technology improves that'll likely change. But not for the time being. Plus having a paper book allows me to sit back and completely unplug, especially given that I deal with tech all day, every day. So reading a paperback is my little way of unplugging for a while.

I don't see an ebook reader listed on your info. Do you just read on a PC screen? There's a vast difference in reading there vs reading on a Kindle or Sony.

WT Sharpe
03-15-2010, 06:00 PM
I don't see an ebook reader listed on your info. Do you just read on a PC screen? There's a vast difference in reading there vs reading on a Kindle or Sony.

I thoroughly examined this statement, and it's not only merely right, it's really most sincerely right! :p

I never did like reading books on a computer, but I can't imagine a day without a dedicated e-reader!

ChrisC333
03-15-2010, 07:21 PM
My reading preferences tend to be about the content rather than the device.

Once I begin reading I'm perfectly happy with a printed book, a hand-written letter, an E-ink reader, iTouch, netbook or whatever I have to hand at the time. They're all fine in their own way.

In my book, the device or method is secondary. It's really all about the words....

montsnmags
03-15-2010, 08:20 PM
I don't see an ebook reader listed on your info. Do you just read on a PC screen? There's a vast difference in reading there vs reading on a Kindle or Sony.
...or an Iliad.

Yet, I'm gonna go with Steven on this one. Pbooks are still my preference. An iPad may or may not change that - I'll have to wait and see.

Cheers,
Marc

WT Sharpe
03-15-2010, 08:44 PM
...or an Iliad.

Yet, I'm gonna go with Steven on this one. Pbooks are still my preference. An iPad may or may not change that - I'll have to wait and see.

Cheers,
Marc

I can't wait to hear your report on the iPad. I want one so bad I can taste it, and was even thinking of using my tax refund to buy one, but I know in my heart that we have other priorities at this time. I don't think I'd prefer it for reading (it's too heavy and has a back-lit screen), but it looks like it would be ideal for writing.

pilotbob
03-15-2010, 08:57 PM
but it looks like it would be ideal for writing.

Really? Do you write with your finger much?

BOb

ChrisC333
03-16-2010, 01:02 AM
Really? Do you write with your finger much?

BOb

Huh? :blink:

Writing with your finger(s) seems pretty popular these days. ;)

As far as I can tell, the iPad 'keyboard' appears to be roomy enough to allow you to use whatever your preferred number of digits usually is - starting from hunt and peck with one or two fingers and going on upwards.

There's a pic somewhere here (still working out the best way to show it...) of somebody who looks keen to use the full set of fingers. It looks feasible to me, but then I'm not too fussy. I've gone from writing on manual typewriters through to a variety of computer keyboards, plus texting on mobile phones whose input methods ranged from grindingly awful to surprisingly quick and easy. I'm pretty much equally scruffy on all of them... :cool:




I can't wait to hear your report on the iPad. I want one so bad I can taste it, and was even thinking of using my tax refund to buy one, but I know in my heart that we have other priorities at this time. I don't think I'd prefer it for reading (it's too heavy and has a back-lit screen), but it looks like it would be ideal for writing.

I don't think the weight would be much of a problem for me - it's quoted at around 680 grams, whereas the regular hardback book that I'm currently reading (Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything) weighs well over 800gms and that's not bothering me. In fact, some of my books weigh as much as 5kgs.

I also actually like backlit screens. So, like you, I may well crack some time this year and get an iPad. I probably wouldn't get it solely as a book reader, but it has other features that I like too. There are a few restrictions that I'd prefer weren't there, but that seems to apply to pretty much any device and I've been able to work around things, or live with it, with my other gadgets.

Cheers,

Chris

FlorenceArt
03-16-2010, 05:22 AM
In fact, some of my books weigh as much as 5kgs.

:eek: I guess I don't need to ask if you ever read in public transports :p

ChrisC333
03-16-2010, 06:39 AM
:eek: I guess I don't need to ask if you ever read in public transports :p

:D

No, and I don't try balancing them on the handlebars of the bike any more either. Plus, the broomstick just doesn't have the horsepower to take off with the extra cargo now....

I'm not normally a book weighing kind of guy, but all the talk on this forum about the specs and pros and cons of various rival devices prompted me to go back and try and impartially review the experience of reading 'real' books.

It was really quite interesting. There were quite a few unexpected things, apart from the weight issue. (BTW the two hefty ones that I weighed were a big 'Coffee Table' style volume about Leonardo da Vinci, and a Compact Oxford English Dictionary which is only "compact" in the sense that they cram all 20 volumes into one single book by using miniaturized type and supplying a magnifier :bookworm:).

Other aspects that I hadn't really noticed much before, because I was so used to it, were things like the sometimes awkward curvature of the pages, especially the nearer you get to the beginning or end of the book. Also the need to use two hands to hold most paperbacks firmly open if they're to be discouraged from suddenly closing on you or sneakily skipping a chunk of pages if your grip slackens off...:eek:

It really seems to boil down to whether you prefer grappling with book goblins or electronics gremlins. They're all prone to misbehave if you don't keep your guard up..... ;)

WT Sharpe
03-16-2010, 10:10 AM
Really? Do you write with your finger much?

BOb

:rofl: No, but the idea of combining that virtual keyboard with the Pages app ($9.99) sounds mighty sweet. According to the Apple website, not only does Pages allow you to create professional looking documents complete with graphics, but you can also import and edit Word docs and PDFs. And in the pictures, at least, that keyboard looks plenty big, especially when the device is held so it displays in landscape mode.

Right now, I can't afford one, which is probably just as well. I want to see how they perform in the real world before I commit to buying one.

pilotbob
03-16-2010, 10:38 AM
As far as I can tell, the iPad 'keyboard' appears to be roomy enough to allow you to use whatever your preferred number of digits usually is - starting from hunt and peck with one or two fingers and going on upwards.

There's a pic somewhere here (still working out the best way to show it...)

Actually when someone said "writing" I was thinking hand writing.

And in the pictures, at least, that keyboard looks plenty big, especially when the device is held so it displays in landscape mode.

Have you ever seen pictures of Cruise boat cabins... they "look" enormous.

I really think they use models with girly hands on those vids/pics. I've gotta say.... I think for a short note or email it would be ok... but for working on a long document it would be too small. Give me a full size keyboard anyday.

BOb

yvanleterrible
03-16-2010, 10:40 AM
Meezzah lahkss boookz becoz meezza lahkss peektchahzz!!!:grin:

Anything that can bring me inside my reading bubble is adequate. My reader does it and so does paper. But content is king.

When a paper books is well crafted, it points to the moods the writer wishes me to find in his stories. A competent publishig house will help an author a long way to achieve this, with artwork, choicy exerpts, additional information and a gorgeous layout. This is something not as likely to be found as satifying in most current ebook yet.

I spent the last weekend in hospital. My wife brought me a paper novel and my Sony. Although I started with the Sony, I quickly went to the paper book. The dim lighting in hospitals is not appropriate for eink. And when you're drowning in pain, carried by morphine, you easily go for the more practical; at that time paper was. Paper is less at a risk of being stolen too because most people hate reading but they do love their gadgetlust...

I can give a gazillion reasons for preferring each side over the other but it all comes down to finding my reading bubble, and staying in it...

Sweetpea
03-16-2010, 10:57 AM
I spent the last weekend in hospital. My wife brought me a paper novel and my Sony. Although I started with the Sony, I quickly went to the paper book. The dim lighting in hospitals is not appropriate for eink. And when you're drowning in pain, carried by morphine, you easily go for the more practical; at that time paper was. Paper is less at a risk of being stolen too because most people hate reading but they do love their gadgetlust...

Which is why 90% of my reading is done on a backlit device. I generally read in darker areas, almost never in well-lit areas. And the e-ink works perfectly in well-lit areas, but not that well in dimmer lit areas.

WT Sharpe
03-16-2010, 11:00 AM
... Have you ever seen pictures of Cruise boat cabins... they "look" enormous.

I really think they use models with girly hands on those vids/pics. I've gotta say.... I think for a short note or email it would be ok... but for working on a long document it would be too small. Give me a full size keyboard anyday.

BOb

That's why I'm glad they have an Apple Store in our area. Before I ever bought a device like that, I'd like to try it out. At worst, I can't imagine it being any more difficult to use than the Kindle keyboard.

Well, actually, I can. I also own a Nook.

pilotbob
03-16-2010, 11:02 AM
At worst, I can't imagine it being any more difficult to use than the Kindle keyboard.


That's probably true. However, I don't think many (I don't) use the Kindle keyboard to write documents. I just use it to enter a search term, or url, or small annotation/note every now and then.

BOb

FlorenceArt
03-16-2010, 11:05 AM
I really think they use models with girly hands on those vids/pics.

Girly hands with steel muscles and tendons :rolleyes:

http://liseuses.fr/media/blogs/actu/2010-02/thumb_plugin/2010-02-10_Skiff02.jpg (http://www.skiff.com/skiff-reader.html)

yvanleterrible
03-16-2010, 11:43 AM
Which is why 90% of my reading is done on a backlit device. I generally read in darker areas, almost never in well-lit areas. And the e-ink works perfectly in well-lit areas, but not that well in dimmer lit areas.Me too, mostly. This is why I'll get an iPad as soon as it's available in Canada...

Please don't start! I know how you feel about it!:p:rofl:

WT Sharpe
03-16-2010, 11:44 AM
That's probably true. However, I don't think many (I don't) use the Kindle keyboard to write documents. I just use it to enter a search term, or url, or small annotation/note every now and then.

BOb

Don't get me wrong, I love the fact that the Kindle has a keyboard, but those small buttons aren't the kind of thing for composing long e-mails or writing essays.

On the other hand, I have become quite proficient at one-hand typing on the Kindle. :)

GeoffC
03-16-2010, 12:19 PM
Don't get me wrong, I love the fact that the Kindle has a keyboard, but those small buttons aren't the kind of thing for composing long e-mails or writing essays.

On the other hand, I have become quite proficient at one-hand typing on the Kindle. :)


must be the right-hand of a friend of ours .... :rofl:

ChrisC333
03-16-2010, 12:20 PM
Paper is less at a risk of being stolen too because most people hate reading but they do love their gadgetlust...

I can give a gazillion reasons for preferring each side over the other but it all comes down to finding my reading bubble, and staying in it...

Indeed, they both have their strengths and weaknesses. You won't get far hanging a Kindle on a nail in the outhouse like you can an old fashioned telephone book for instance - the sheets just can't be torn off in the same way. And the ereader doesn't have that satisfying new paper smell that the pages of a freshly opened book do.

But on the other hand, you can't turn your average paperback on and use it like a modest torch when you need to stumble through the house in the middle of the night without turning all the lights on - as I did the other night with my iTouch...

Either way, I agree with it really being about getting in the 'reading bubble' and most methods seem to manage that.

I hope the pain has gone away since the hospital visit. Sounds nasty.

yvanleterrible
03-16-2010, 12:27 PM
Indeed, they both have their strengths and weaknesses. You won't get far hanging a Kindle on a nail in the outhouse like you can an old fashioned telephone book for instance - the sheets just can't be torn off in the same way. And the ereader doesn't have that satisfying new paper smell that the pages of a freshly opened book do.

But on the other hand, you can't turn your average paperback on and use it like a modest torch when you need to stumble through the house in the middle of the night without turning all the lights on - as I did the other night with my iTouch...

Either way, I agree with it really being about getting in the 'reading bubble' and most methods seem to manage that.

I hope the pain has gone away since the hospital visit. Sounds nasty.Can't do that with eink either!


Triple clean fractures on my right ankle. The foot came off the leg... yuck!
Funny thing is I'm off meds now...

FlorenceArt
03-16-2010, 12:38 PM
Can't do that with eink either!


Triple clean fractures on my right ankle. The foot came off the leg... yuck!
Funny thing is I'm off meds now...

Errr... is that a good thing? I hope you're feeling better now.

yvanleterrible
03-16-2010, 12:40 PM
Errr... is that a good thing? I hope you're feeling better now.That's what's funny, I don't feel worse than if I had an overtithened shoe...

pagansoul
03-16-2010, 12:53 PM
I read a heck of a lot more on my Mac than my Kindle2. I have enough ebooks to last me a lifetime so I very very rarely buy an ebook off Amazon but download plenty of free books from everywhere I can get them. Most of my collection are CDroms or DVD sets that contain thousands of books, magazines, comics that were made to read off a computer, in color. I use my Kindle for simple fiction in MOBI.

I tend to use my Kindle in bed. I don't buy paperbacks anymore or even look for them at flea market. I do still buy those big coffee-table books with lots of pictures because I love them. Can I live without my Kindle, yes. Can I live without my computer, yes, but I would be very unhappy without it.

GeoffC
03-16-2010, 01:10 PM
Can't do that with eink either!


Triple clean fractures on my right ankle. The foot came off the leg... yuck!
Funny thing is I'm off meds now...


footloose ?

yvanleterrible
03-16-2010, 01:11 PM
footloose ?Not fancy free anymore...

WT Sharpe
03-16-2010, 03:41 PM
I read a heck of a lot more on my Mac than my Kindle2. I have enough ebooks to last me a lifetime so I very very rarely buy an ebook off Amazon but download plenty of free books from everywhere I can get them. Most of my collection are CDroms or DVD sets that contain thousands of books, magazines, comics that were made to read off a computer, in color. I use my Kindle for simple fiction in MOBI.

I tend to use my Kindle in bed. I don't buy paperbacks anymore or even look for them at flea market. I do still buy those big coffee-table books with lots of pictures because I love them. Can I live without my Kindle, yes. Can I live without my computer, yes, but I would be very unhappy without it.

I'm just the opposite. I do most of my book-reading on my Kindle, but in bed I read my iMac.

My wife says I'm really strange.

rhadin
03-16-2010, 07:01 PM
I have neither gone back to pbooks nor left pbooks.

After 2.5 years of using my Sony 505, I still love -- actually prefer -- reading on it to reading pbooks. But I haven't left pbooks and gone wholly ebook. I only buy fiction in ebook form; all nonfiction I buy is in pbook. For every fiction book I buy, I probably buy 2 nonfiction books. But that ration of ebook-to-pbook gets skewed even further because there are certain fiction authors, like David Weber and L.E. Modesitt, Jr., who I buy only in pbook as well.

With the exception of authors I like to collect, I would buy more books in ebook form except for the lack of a universal DRM scheme, something that works like the scheme used for DVDs -- every DVD device can play every DVD, and for the inability of publishers to do an acceptable formatting job with nonfiction ebooks.

I enjoy reading on my Sony 505 enough that I wouldn't think of replacing it except that I want a larger screen that I can use to read my daily newspapers. I'd like to switch my print subscriptions to electronic ones sometime this year.

rhadin
03-16-2010, 07:06 PM
For those of us urban apartment-dwellers whose living room storage os shared between books, DVDs, video games etc. it is *much* easier to buy an ebook, strip the DRM and run it over to a backup drive for posterity...

My house is not much larger than a decent size urban apartment (we downsized when the last child left the nest) and face some of the same space problem. Our solution was to stop buying DVDs and to not buy video games and other space-occupying electronic gadgets. Of course, since I rarely watch videos and never play video games, much preferring to read and use my imagination to create the scenes (something that is easy if the author is good), makes such devices unneeded and helps free up space. But then the 2 dogs and the cat, as well as my business equipment and my wife's art studio do cramp the space a bit. But give me books any day over videos and video games.

Ea
03-17-2010, 04:08 AM
... , something that works like the scheme used for DVDs -- every DVD device can play every DVD, ...
They would be able to if it wasn't for those darned region codes... ;)

kennyc
03-17-2010, 07:07 AM
That's what's funny, I don't feel worse than if I had an overtithened shoe...


I think the mass quantities have not worn off yet...

that break sounds horrible! :eek:

Makes me queasy just thinking about it.

kennyc
03-17-2010, 07:09 AM
I'm just the opposite. I do most of my book-reading on my Kindle, but in bed I read my iMac.

My wife says I'm really strange.

Smart woman. :rofl:

GeoffC
03-17-2010, 09:59 AM
They would be able to if it wasn't for those darned region codes... ;)

one can, at least, buy multi-region players ....

Ea
03-17-2010, 11:23 AM
That's what's funny, I don't feel worse than if I had an overtithened shoe...
Overtithened...

Does that mean 10% more expensive than it should be? Or just more than 10% too tight? :D

yvanleterrible
03-17-2010, 11:29 AM
Sorry fer the typo:o

Overtightened, in 'laces too tight' where blood circulation is hindered and causes the foot some uncomfort...

Jelena
03-19-2010, 07:43 AM
I do still buy those big coffee-table books with lots of pictures because I love them.

The same.

Joebill
03-19-2010, 10:27 PM
I use both my ereader and paper books.

jonsbjons
03-29-2010, 11:02 AM
The same.

I dream that in the e-books, too, had a lot of pictures. Recently glad to hear that fb2 supports illustrations. In general, all moving in the right direction.
But I can not deny that the big coffee-table books with pictures - a very special pleasure.

cfrizz
03-29-2010, 12:35 PM
I will probably never go back to reading paper books again except the the ones I already own. Since discovering the ebook world at the end of last year, I have bought 54 books & it is only March! By the end of the year I will probably have over 200 books stored on my pc & reader.

There is no way I would have purchased any of these books in paper, simply because I have no room for them. Add in the fact that with my pc & reader I can adjust the size of the print so that I don't have to strain my eyes, and I'm one happy camper.

jonsbjons
03-30-2010, 07:35 AM
I will probably never go back to reading paper books again except the the ones I already own. Since discovering the ebook world at the end of last year, I have bought 54 books & it is only March! By the end of the year I will probably have over 200 books stored on my pc & reader.

There is no way I would have purchased any of these books in paper, simply because I have no room for them. Add in the fact that with my pc & reader I can adjust the size of the print so that I don't have to strain my eyes, and I'm one happy camper.

You are reading and this is important. Receive the information. Never could understand the indignation at the e-books. As if they were something worse. Recently, a friend said: "My higher education requires the reading paper books." I was shocked:)

FlorenceArt
03-30-2010, 08:37 AM
Recently, a friend said: "My higher education requires the reading paper books."

What a silly thing to say. I can understand that some people prefer to read paper books, though I don't. But if this person thinks that reading a book in e-book form somehow makes the content less valuable, maybe their "higher education" was a waste of time and money, since it didn't teach them to think ;)

yvanleterrible
03-30-2010, 09:15 AM
What a silly thing to say. I can understand that some people prefer to read paper books, though I don't. But if this person thinks that reading a book in e-book form somehow makes the content less valuable, maybe their "higher education" was a waste of time and money, since it didn't teach them to think ;)Very true Florence.
I would also add that this person is suffering from the inability to change away from social programmation.

jonsbjons
03-31-2010, 07:54 AM
What a silly thing to say. I can understand that some people prefer to read paper books, though I don't. But if this person thinks that reading a book in e-book form somehow makes the content less valuable, maybe their "higher education" was a waste of time and money, since it didn't teach them to think ;)

It would be funny if it were not so sad. Lady who say it - editor. And she is not the only person who says it. I only hope over time this nightmare would end.

Teyrnon
04-01-2010, 12:22 AM
It would be funny if it were not so sad. Lady who say it - editor. And she is not the only person who says it. I only hope over time this nightmare would end.

I'd be curious as to the mindset that makes things like this make sense to people who utter them. Surely they can't think that paper has some sort of magical property that makes the words have more impact. Or maybe it's that electronic formats seem more nebulous and insubstantial to them that they can't imagine it being identical to reading the same words in a hefty chunk of decaying dead tree?

mmefford
04-06-2010, 01:41 PM
I recently bought a paperback for the first time in a while and really didn't like it. Nothing will take the place of my Kindle anytime soon. I get irritated when books aren't available in electronic format. I usually just skip those and find another Kindle book. :book2:

mrkarl
04-07-2010, 12:25 AM
haven't touched paper since I got my ereader, and unless I have to I probably won't.

GraceKrispy
04-07-2010, 05:17 AM
I have never been a book collector. Iʻve been a very avid reader all my life (apparently, doing household chores and cooking and brushing teeth, etc, while reading is not what "normal" people do, according to my dad), but I have gotten virtually all my books from the library, or other "free" sources throughout my life. I love libraries, I love sitting there, browsing, choosing, smelling...

I have bought more books since I got the sony, but usually on sale or in bundles. Otherwise I still use the library, and or take advantage of free book offers (which actually gets me reading quite a few genres/authors I never would have considered before).

Because the library ebook collection available to me isnʻt huge, I still frequent the physical library and choose paper books. I like reading both pbooks and ebooks, actually prefer each of them for different reasons. I would say I tend to read more ebooks these days, but it really depends on whatʻs available. I always look first to ebooks, but Iʻll easily go to a pbook if I canʻt find what I want in ebook for a very low price or for borrowing only.

Right now, I have a pbook from the library that I want to read. But I am having trouble putting down my sony long enough to pick up something that heavy, and with pages to turn! Reading an ebook to me is comfortable, convenient, and pleasurable. reading a pbook is like visiting an old friend. I still love that friend.

Logseman
04-07-2010, 05:40 AM
I'd be curious as to the mindset that makes things like this make sense to people who utter them. Surely they can't think that paper has some sort of magical property that makes the words have more impact. Or maybe it's that electronic formats seem more nebulous and insubstantial to them that they can't imagine it being identical to reading the same words in a hefty chunk of decaying dead tree?
At the moment, paper can store more sorts of content reliably :p

However the statement is quite intolerant in my opinion, there is something you may like to consider. I give you my arm that books that are enjoyed in an eReader most will be different from paper books. Paper and eReader read differently. eReader books are much more prone to a more analytical reading, starting from the fact that a table of contents is highly valued in an ebook and people get angry when there is none. How many of you didn't even give a look to the pbook's index?

FlorenceArt
04-07-2010, 06:07 AM
I give you my arm that books that are enjoyed in an eReader most will be different from paper books. Paper and eReader read differently. eReader books are much more prone to a more analytical reading, starting from the fact that a table of contents is highly valued in an ebook and people get angry when there is none. How many of you didn't even give a look to the pbook's index?

I suppose it should be true that the medium has some kind of influence on how or what you read. I have a lot of difficulties concentrating on something I read on a computer screen, and I think I'm not alone in that, and probably it explains many misconceptions about e-books. But I haven't noticed any difference in the way I read e-books, personally. I tend to read in a linear fashion, even non-fiction, so a table of content is usually wasted on me, lol. But I have to admit I don't read a lot of non-fiction in e-book form, simply because I often can't find the books I want.

MV64
04-07-2010, 07:22 PM
I loved my e-reader and still do. But I hardly ever use it anymore. I just recently finished my bachelors in history so I had a lot of actual book reading to do and leisure reading went out the window. It sort of got me out of the habit of reading e-books and I recently found a string of excellent hardcover history books at Barnes and Noble's bargain section, so I really haven't been able to go back to e-book reading.

And now with all these price changes, I simply can't justify paying that kind of money when I can find the regular book for cheap. I don't read romance or sci-fi, and those are the books most frequently discounted online.

So basically I just use my e-reader for historical books and public domain. Which, don't get me wrong, I've gotten the value of my e-reader back many times through public domain, but it'd be nice to feel comfortable spending so much money on a non-physical thing such as an e-book. The publishers really shot themselves in the foot with this.