View Full Version : How To Deal With New Pricing Strategies (and get noticed?)


poohbear_nc
02-09-2010, 01:10 PM
Since it seems that publishers only understand, and only care about, one thing - money - and not readers, I intend to adopt the following response to the newly announced pricing schemes. I don't know how much impact, if any, it will have, but I feel it is a fair personal response to their announcements.

When an ebook is initially launched at a price I feel is too high, and I want to read it right away, I will buy a "Used like new" copy from Amazon or another 3rd party merchant and send the following letter to the publisher and the author:

Dear ...........

I am an ebook owner. I feel that your price for the digital version of ...................... is too high and I will not buy it. Instead I purchased a used copy of the physical book on Amazon and paid ...... for it. NONE of this money goes to you, the publisher. NONE of this money goes to your author. Instead, Amazon and some anonymous seller are getting my money. And I am getting my money's worth. You, on the other hand, have just lost ...... income for the sale you lost.

I will not be coerced into paying more for a digital version of a book than I feel it is worth. Every instance of over-pricing will cost you money, at least from me.

Is this how you really want to train your reading public's buying habits?

Boston
02-09-2010, 01:31 PM
Announcements aside, I have been doing this in recent months as I've seen ebook prices go up.

I'd love to steal your follow-up idea to help get the message across.

Bremen Cole
02-09-2010, 01:41 PM
Good idea, if the masses would do it, it would work...

SCION
02-09-2010, 01:52 PM
I applaud those who are steadfast in adhering to such course of action. I would simply add the book to my online wishlist and circle back in the future for a price check.

Polyglot27
02-09-2010, 02:08 PM
Looks like prices are going to increase even more. The arrival of Apple's iPad has forced Google to renegociate rates with publishers. Amazon too is going to increase its prices.
See the following article.
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/09/books/09google.html?hpw

poohbear_nc
02-09-2010, 02:27 PM
Announcements aside, I have been doing this in recent months as I've seen ebook prices go up.

I'd love to steal your follow-up idea to help get the message across.

Steal away - communicating with you wallet may be the only way to get publishers' attention.

Alisa
02-09-2010, 02:37 PM
I really hate reading paper books these days. I'm considering seeing how fast I can rip them to digital with acceptable quality. I have a scanner with ADF, OCR software, and I'm not totally averse to destroying the paper copy. It seems a bit of a waste of resources, though. Of course, it may not really be worthwhile considering I rarely re-read books. I guess it will depend on how soon after release they lower the price.

phenomshel
02-09-2010, 02:43 PM
I really hate reading paper books these days. I'm considering seeing how fast I can rip them to digital with acceptable quality. I have a scanner with ADF, OCR software, and I'm not totally averse to destroying the paper copy. It seems a bit of a waste of resources, though. Of course, it may not really be worthwhile considering I rarely re-read books. I guess it will depend on how soon after release they lower the price.

I'm looking at this alternative as well. There are some inexpensive (at least if you already own a digital camera) plans for a do it yourself book scanner at Instructables.

Duiker
02-09-2010, 02:52 PM
Go to a Torrent site and download the book. If I've already paid for the hard copy of the book I have no qualms about downloading a copy for my blackberry.

poohbear_nc
02-09-2010, 02:55 PM
Go to a Torrent site and download the book. If I've already paid for the hard copy of the book I have no qualms about downloading a copy for my blackberry.

It would be quite eye-opening if - say, after the launch of a bestseller - with the higher ebook price model in place, or a delayed ebook release - if torrent/sharing sites reported download statistics to the publishers - showing them how much their model cost them.

Scott Nicholson
02-09-2010, 03:00 PM
A lot of independent authors are intent on keeping prices low, mostly at $1.99. If you look at the Amazon bestseller list for Kindle, they are gaining a lot of the bestseller slots. The high ebook price is mostly designed to protect new hardcover sales, but there's a ton of activity below. I started a small digital press to ease into this window of opportunity--we're developing a working-class mindset. Hope you explore it at hauntedcomputerbooks.blogspot.com. We're also in Smashwords and developing other outlets as well, and will try to keep our content unprotected wherever possible. Thanks for sharing your ideas.

Scott Nicholson
The Skull Ring coming March 1

Steven Lake
03-16-2010, 10:41 AM
Hey, I like what you're doing. As an author and a realist, I know that anything that hurts the customer in favor of the corporation ultimately hurts me the writer. If a company gets greedy, power hungry, or controlling, you the reader suffer just as much as I do, if not more in some cases. And that's completely unacceptable to me. I've fought corporate greed and power mongering too long in the FOSS world just to come over here and roll over for it too. Keep at this, and maybe in time more people will join with your little protest and get the attention of these greedy jerks.

Kali Yuga
03-17-2010, 09:38 AM
Looks like prices are going to increase even more. The arrival of Apple's iPad has forced Google to renegociate rates with publishers....
Google always planned to give publishers more control over pricing than the established retailers. Amazon's pricing changes are also pretty well known. However, you should also keep in mind that the increases are in most cases for new books, it's not a permanent increase. A new ebook will be $13-15, and within a year will drop to $10 or so.

Blue Tyson
03-17-2010, 01:15 PM
You guaranteeing that price drop then? :)

Or, wanna bet? ;-)

pshrynk
03-17-2010, 01:52 PM
I moved this from News to General Discussion.

Zipr
03-17-2010, 02:00 PM
I really hate reading paper books these days. I'm considering seeing how fast I can rip them to digital with acceptable quality. I have a scanner with ADF, OCR software, and I'm not totally averse to destroying the paper copy. It seems a bit of a waste of resources, though. Of course, it may not really be worthwhile considering I rarely re-read books. I guess it will depend on how soon after release they lower the price.

If you know where to look, I'm sure you can find that someone has already done the work for you.

charleski
03-17-2010, 02:00 PM
Since it seems that publishers only understand, and only care about, one thing - money

Kind of ironic, since the rest of your post gives the impression that the only thing readers like you care about is money as well.

http://loudounlady.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/pot-kettle-black.jpg?w=319&h=242

LCF
03-17-2010, 02:28 PM
Kind of ironic, since the rest of your post gives the impression that the only thing readers like you care about is money as well.

http://loudounlady.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/pot-kettle-black.jpg?w=319&h=242

I wouldn't call it ironic. No one expects the publishers to work on loss or with minimal income. It's the greediness that's not well taken.

poohbear_nc
03-17-2010, 04:21 PM
I wouldn't call it ironic. No one expects the publishers to work on loss or with minimal income. It's the greediness that's not well taken.

:ditto:

If the only thing I cared about was money, I wouldn't even bother to try to purchase a legitimate copy, I would download an illegal copy for free.

As LCF points out, the issue is greed, or fair pricing for a commodity - two related sides of an economic issue. The original post expressed my personal opinion on this issue.

Nakor
03-17-2010, 05:08 PM
It would be quite eye-opening if - say, after the launch of a bestseller - with the higher ebook price model in place, or a delayed ebook release - if torrent/sharing sites reported download statistics to the publishers - showing them how much their model cost them.

Some torrent sites have public trackers which make that information readily available - total downloaded and uploaded numbers, total complete copies distributed, and so forth. I'm not familiar with any of the sites used to so distribute eBooks, but if any use torrents it would not surprise me to discover the information is there for the publishers to use at their leisure.

charleski
03-19-2010, 12:06 AM
I wouldn't call it ironic. No one expects the publishers to work on loss or with minimal income. It's the greediness that's not well taken.
Wow! Look out the window! Look at that huge queue of VCs piling up to invest in digital publishing!

Oh, wait...
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_OF9vLkMRWbI/Sp4FuyU7S0I/AAAAAAAAAD0/5ZF63QUwqro/s320/417.gif

Publishers aren't being greedy, they're trying to stay alive.

I intend to still be reading books in twenty years' time. I want a market where publishers are still around to provide me with stuff I'll want to read.
(And no, vanity publishing isn't the answer.)

csdaley
03-19-2010, 01:51 PM
I have been waiting for the book to come down to a price point I will buy it for. I have plenty to read and figure waiting allows me to send the message on what price I am willing to pay.

http://www.csdaley.com/2010/01/amazon-slap-down.html

http://www.csdaley.com/2010/01/book-publishing-goes-boom.html

Steven Lake
03-19-2010, 03:34 PM
ROFL! You guys are something, ya know that? You guys remind me of my old forum members over at raiden.net. They're still there, but I'm not the owner anymore. But they were just about as silly as you guys. ^_^