View Full Version : Something New: iRex MyScript Notes


Tscherno
08-07-2006, 01:29 AM
Now @ the shop:

https://www.irexshop.com/product_info.php/products_id/43

TadW
08-07-2006, 04:54 AM
They are simply reselling this tool. See here for more:

http://www.visionobjects.com/products/application-software/myscript-notes/

Download here:

https://212.180.53.140/gb/store/download.asp

scotty1024
08-07-2006, 07:04 AM
The page doesn't exactly give the warm snuggies that it works with the iLiad. Have you tried it?

scotty1024
08-07-2006, 07:20 AM
Well its selling cheaper at iRex so I bought mine there. :)

By the way, they added "State" as a field on the shipping page, yeah!

Hopefully my iLiad gets here before Aug 25! :D

scotty1024
08-07-2006, 07:52 AM
Uh you may want to wait on ordering for a day or so.

My irexshop account told me I have 5 download attempts from the not present download link and I have to use them before August 14.

Looks like a bug or two to work out on this one.

Riocaz
08-07-2006, 08:45 AM
Err wasn't handwriting recognition one of the original promiced utilities or is my memory faulty?

ali
08-07-2006, 08:50 AM
Err wasn't handwriting recognition one of the original promiced utilities or is my memory faulty?

We probably share that faulty memory. I remember it being it one of the Q4 features.

scotty1024
08-07-2006, 11:18 AM
So then its early and those that don't need/want it don't have to carry the cost in the base iLiad price tag.

Works for me.

TadW
08-07-2006, 12:19 PM
Well its selling cheaper at iRex so I bought mine there. :)

You sure? Price is listed as 59.95 EUR on both sites.

TadW
08-07-2006, 12:25 PM
Btw, I am surprised too that they don't bundle the software with the iRex. The maker of MyScript is known to resell his app as OEM to other vendors. For instance, Logitech uses MyScript for its io2 Digital Pen. The pen costs around $150. Btw, I recommend you check out these user comments before you buy the software:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00064FXH0/sr=8-2/qid=1154964222/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-0553922-3212949?ie=UTF8

The handwriting recognition software is pretty bad, even with the latest update. I think if I were sitting at my desk printing perfectly all day long, then the software would work pretty well. But from my perspective, it fails the "real world" test. When I'm actually out and using the pen, the software doesn't have flexibility to deal with simple things that most people do as they write for longer periods -- angled text, letters with variable spacing, letters/numbers that look similar. You have to print very consistently and very precisely to get good recognition. Obviously handwriting recognition like this is a huge task and very difficult. The documentation that comes with the pen makes it clear how you need to write to make it work well -- unfortunately, the marketing information makes it sound like you can just go ahead and write away and it can handle anything, which is very misleading. FYI, the handwriting recognition software is made by a 3rd party, which means that Logitech offers basically zero support for it.

El Chupacabra
08-07-2006, 12:27 PM
I found it abusive, they expect me to buy a 60 program that should be bundled with the iLiad as managing software. As of now the only I got from Irex is a long wait, 669 less and late or none reply to my questions. I hope at least the device rocks and it's sufficiently open to the user community.

Alexander Turcic
08-07-2006, 12:39 PM
Digged around google for some more reviews which also cover the software:


http://www.desktoppipeline.com/56900484
My single characters matched 100% but the text only hit 78%, which was unacceptable according to the training system. I couldn't really find any way to correct the problems within the software so I re-wrote the pages (more than I really wanted to do). I was a little more careful with my penmanship on the second go-round and registered an 89% match, which was good enough to use.
http://hardware.earthweb.com/peripherals/article.php/3460441
We were able to create enough recognizable text for a handwriting-recognition "profile" on the first try (although our usual handwriting is a mix of printing and cursive that may be easier to recognize than true cursive writing). If the program has trouble with your samples, you can correct them on the PC. Once you have a handwriting recognition profile, MyScript converts your scrawls to computer text fairly quickly and accurately; except for consistently misinterpreting a capital I, it was close to letter-perfect in our tests.
http://laptopmag.com/Review/Logitech-Io2-Digital-Writing-System.htm
Alas, The MyScript Notes system is not much better than the built-in ICR at recognizing even block text. It failed to recognize drawn boxes and circles, and in most cases the text was fully mangled in translation. It does come with training routines, but compared to the handwriting recognition in Microsoft Windows XP Tablet PC Edition, the MyScript routines are not even in the ballpark.


To iRex's credit, I think Logitech is also just including the trial version of MyScript.

scotty1024
08-07-2006, 05:05 PM
I've used (and still have buried someplace) the Logitech Pen (ditto a CrossPad, which seems to cross paths with this software as well...) and three generations of Tablet PC's.

The Logitech Pen never really lived up to its fame. The Cross Pad wasn't toooo bad...

The key difference I place my faith in with the iLiad: Wacom.

I should put a caution on that, *if* irex has the pressure sensitivity hooked up. In my experience those lovely 256 levels of pressure sensitivity make a nice difference in hand writing recognition recognition rates. I also have my favorite Cross Executive Stylus (no cap) that I use on my Tablet's. A nice upgrade for recognition rates as well (helps keep the hand from getting sloppy from stress.)

Personally I'm sweating my battery working in my iLiad more than whether the hand writing recognition will rock (possibly eventually with iLiad software >2.X something). :(

As for pricing, the MyScript site was 60 euro, irex said 50 euro, I wound up paying $62.94 USD.

According to Google: 62.94 U.S. dollars = 49.1066552 Euro

I just checked the site now and it says 59.95 EUR, so maybe it pays to shop early. :)

Riocaz
08-07-2006, 08:02 PM
So then its early and those that don't need/want it don't have to carry the cost in the base iLiad price tag.

Works for me.

Err the point I was making was that I remembered it (handwriting recognition) being listed as a feature. As in something that was part of the iLiad, not something which would need to be purchased seperatly. And thus, something I have already paid for!

Not to mention the fact that this is going to mean that whything I write will need to be downloaded from the iLiad to be processed via a seperate machine.

My Zaurus, which uses the same OS as the iLiad, can handle handwriting recognition, with far less cpu. So why such a <selfcensored> way of implementing it for the iLiad.

Interestingly, just went to check my memory at www.archive.org, and oddly none previous versions of the irextechnologies site, now exist there. Which is rather odd, as I have checked there before.

Riocaz
08-07-2006, 08:44 PM
On the other-hand having re-read the posts from back then (particularly the mails CommanderROR passed on from iRex, it would appear that this was the software they were always intending to use.

I still think it's an utterly half-<selfcensored> way of doing it.

firekat
08-07-2006, 11:56 PM
Does this mean that when all you super hackers/developers out there get the SDK your going to implement hand writing recognition a'la Zaurus for us non-hacker types? Pretty Pleeeze!

DHer
08-08-2006, 04:20 AM
yeah, all we super hackers/developers will boldly go where no open source developer has gone before and develop a handwriting recognition which actually works. (the only one which works quite good even with my handwriting is microsofts tablet pc software)

ok, qtopia supports basic handwriting: http://www.trolltech.com/products/qtopia/learnmore/screenshots/?searchterm=handwriting

On the other hand, i've got nothing else to do the rest of my holidays =)


hm. when i come to think about it.
writing a mouse emulator so you can use the iliad as computer mouse and using the Microsoft handwriting recognition should be possible.

we could just use the vektor file, write a program which moves the cursor on the pc accordingly and let microsoft do all the hard work =)

scotty1024
08-08-2006, 04:41 AM
I'm all in favor of them spending their software development budget inside the iLiad getting the PDF viewer as efficient as possible.

Buy where possible, write the rest I say. :)

doctorow
08-08-2006, 04:48 AM
Well said, scotty, and I fully agree.

scotty1024
08-10-2006, 12:22 PM
Well no sign of the iLiad but I got my email bright and early this morning to come collect MyScriptNotes20023.zip from them. Which I've done.

I'm told I'll get the license file in a few days.

So if you can stomach paying them for it, its just about available, and ahead of schedule.

yokos
08-16-2006, 08:52 AM
Have a look at screenshots if you like. :crowngrin
I have tested recognition with "mouse writen" short German sentence.

So 2.6 has the new .irx format, which this program can read?

Alexander Turcic
08-16-2006, 09:09 AM
Not bad. I am quite impressed that it would understand your handwriting ;)

yokos
08-16-2006, 09:32 AM
Not bad. I am quite impressed that it would understand your handwriting ;)
heh, it was hard work to write with mouse on PC :rolleyes5, somewhere I have a graphical pen in my cupboards, but where?

ElaHuguet
08-16-2006, 10:05 AM
I've tested it with my iLiad (yesterday), I thought there was no way it would get my writing... not one mistake! (except my lines were going up, and it put some words on the wrong lines, my mistake).

oliverbogler
08-16-2006, 04:56 PM
Hi everyone - I tried to purchase this, but the iRex shop wanted to charge me shipping - $40 no less. I thought it was a license for a download? Anyone else have this problem?

Thanks! :blink:

yokos
08-17-2006, 08:31 AM
These screenshots are 2 example notes files - one in English the other in Chinese.

scstraus
08-22-2006, 08:29 PM
I've used (and still have buried someplace) the Logitech Pen (ditto a CrossPad, which seems to cross paths with this software as well...) and three generations of Tablet PC's.

Sounds a lot like me :). I'll look forward to what you think of the iliad. So far from what I've seen in the videos it doesn't look like there's pressure sensitivity.

segatang
08-23-2006, 05:22 AM
What amazing the recognization accuracy!
Will it support the tranditional Chinese in future?

klark
05-26-2007, 08:19 AM
can someone tell me if the handwriting recognition really works on the iliad?

right now im planning to buy one. but im not sure yet. i have a vision of how it should work, but i guess that vision won't come true ;-)
i would love to take my notes at university on my iliad.

scotty1024
05-26-2007, 02:56 PM
IMHO the least expensive top quality college note taker you can buy is a used Newton Message Pad 2100, roughly $100 USD on eBay.

The main thing the Newton gets right for me is that it uses a roll of paper and you can yank up more paper as needed and still be able to see the notes you just took. With the iLiad you get a sheet at a time and can't see the notes you just took with out flipping back to them.

Maybe you're different but I don't like the page method the iLiad uses.

THe Newton correctly date and time stamps your notes and allows you to file them into categories: PSCI115 CALC104 etc... The iLiad can't set its clock correctly unless you live in London and has no filing ability, I mean none, nada, zip, zilch, zero, null pointer reference.

Yeah I know: WTF were they thinking?

The Newton gets a couple weeks of heavy use out of a set of those AA Lithium batteries or you can use some of the 2650mah NiMh rechargable AA's and get about a week. Plus if you go flat in class you can pop in a set of batteries and be back up. If your iLiad goes flat you're back to using paper to take notes as it doesn't have a replaceable battery or a AA battery booster dongle.

The Newton will also take audio notes if you need as well. For some reason the iLiad has no microphone yet iRex had us pay for a chip inside with a microphone input and all the stuff needed to digitize it.

The Newton has a built in cover that flips over the screen sideways (like a book) and can be locked back behind the unit when taking notes. The iLiad has no cover to protect its delicate e-Ink panel so you must use a case, which is not half as nice as a built in flip cover in my opinion.

The Newton has rubber feet that hold it nicely to a desk whilst taking notes. The iLiad has no rubber feet and tends to rock slightly while scribbling, which I find distracting. The iLiad also tends to slip around on the desk during writing, which I also find distracting. Yes, you can bring a "rubber" mat or find a case that acts like a writing mat but you'd think iRex could have spent the $.25 to put rubber feet on the unit. I haven't been able to find any rubber feet that stick well to the rubberized case material (if iRex had designed it for feet it would have had spots for the feet that didn't have the rubberized texture.)

You also get calendaring, todo's and address book functions with the Newton, all generally handy for college students.

The Newton can convert hand written notes to text itself which task you can perform when you have spare moments: riding bus, eating, bathroom, watching TV, boring lectures etc... stick in a Wifi card and beam the notes to your PC. The iLiad can't recognize its own notes, you need to buy the PC based recognizer software. The software focuses on text and doesn't do much for drawings/diagrams.

If you really have $800 USD to purchase a note taker then I'd point you to the entry level model of the Samsung Q1 Ultra UMPC with One Note 2007. One Note 2007 rocks and has many more features than a Newton. The Samsung has less battery life than an iLiad but has a replaceable battery so you can have an extra with you. You can also use real Adobe Acrobat Reader to view PDF's, including the DRM versions the iLiad can't handle. Plus the Samsung rocks a real hard drive with tons of space (compared to an iLiad) for ebooks, tunes, movies, TV, MathLab or Mathmatica etc...

wallcraft
05-26-2007, 04:32 PM
If you really have $800 USD to purchase a note taker then I'd point you to the entry level model of the Samsung Q1 Ultra UMPC with One Note 2007. One Note 2007 rocks and has many more features than a Newton. The Samsung has less battery life than an iLiad but has a replaceable battery so you can have an extra with you. You can also use real Adobe Acrobat Reader to view PDF's, including the DRM versions the iLiad can't handle. Plus the Samsung rocks a real hard drive with tons of space (compared to an iLiad) for ebooks, tunes, movies, TV, MathLab or Mathmatica etc... umpcportal (http://www.umpcportal.com/modules/news/article.php?storyid=629) points to someone who ordered a Q1U with extended battery in the US for $800. This will also run MobiPocket Reader and FBReader (assuming Vista does not screw up the XP versions). The real battery life won't be known until these get in the hands of users, but the 600 MHz version with extended battery should last a relatively long time.

klark
05-27-2007, 06:47 AM
scotty, damn. that was some pretty good and detailed answer ;) so thanks for that.

but i still have a few questions:
- does the newton transform my notes safely to a .txt (or whatever) format? some time ago i tried OneNote on a "real" tablet pc and was suprised of how good the transformation worked. is the text-recognition of the newton similar to that?
- even if i would buy a newton for taking notes i still need a device that will display my pdfs (books, scripts). because that is what im really looking for. so i thought the iliad was a good combination of both of the features. but i have to admit, the more i read and see about it, the more sceptical i get. seems like the most basic stuff is missing. and i wont buy a gadget for more than $650 that wont fulfill my needs. perhaps a sony and a newton will work.
BUT: that would mean i would have to carry my macbook, a newton and sony ereader with me :-D

so the umpc would be an alternative. but that thing is pretty expensive. the price for the iliad is barely acceptable. and after all, i dont know if i would like to have a pc with windows again. (i dont want to start the old apple vs. pc war, but i figured out that the mac works better for me.)

seems like that the device that i need has not been invented yet ;-) a new newton would be amazing i guess.

oh nearly forgot about that ... i saw that nokia 800 some time ago. its small but it looked pretty good, unfortunately no retailer in my town has one. so im not able to take a look at it.


edit:
perhaps i should post in "which one should i buy". that seems the better place for that kind of questions.

Adam B.
05-27-2007, 02:17 PM
I can't believe that you're recommending a 10+ year old piece of technology over the iLiad...Yes the newton was ahead of it's time, but I don't consider it Jobs' gift to man as many of the apple fanboys do.

Using the iLiad for handwriting recognition may or may not work for you depending on the application. If you're taking a lot of technical notes, with figures, numbers, special formatting, etc. It is probably not your best choice if you wish to convert to text. Vision Objects works well enough for normal sentences and dictionary words. However, it is still not as good as Microsoft's handwriting recognition solution with the Tablet PC OS and One Note. If you don't mind reading handwritten notes, the iLiad is great.

As far as everything else... The battery life is okay. It's better than any Tablet PC or UMPC, including the Nokia's.

Since it runs Linux, and is in active development, improvements and 3rd party applications are coming out at a regular basis. If you want to read books and unprotected PDF's the iLiad works very well. Much better than the Sony on typical PDF's. In order to get a PDF to look right on the Sony reader, you will most likely need to run it through a 3rd party program to rotate and crop it, and change the fonts before it is readable. The iLiad, with it's larger screen and advanced software features can view most standard documents without modification. If necessary, you can rotate and/or zoom on the iLiad in order to get the best possible viewing experience.

All in all, it depends on what you need to do with it, and how much work you want to do to achieve the results you are looking for. I, for one, would not trade my iLiad for any other device on the market. Others may not feel the say way...

nekokami
05-28-2007, 01:56 AM
I'm hardly an "apple fanboy," but I think Scotty's assessment of the Newton vs. the iLiad for notetaking was dead-on. This was a tool designed to do what the iLiad should have done. I like my iLiad tons, but I'm glad I didn't pay full price for it (I bought it used). Yes, it's getting better all the time, but for note-taking, the Newton still has it beat. Which is fairly embarrassing, considering how much expense and energy consumption is due to the iLiad's wacom digitizer.

Unfortunately, klark also wants to read PDFs, and I don't believe there is a PDF reader for the Newton. One would have to convert PDFs to another format, which can be done (even for non-text PDFs, if one wants to use OCR software), but it's a pain.

I haven't tried a UMPC yet. I really don't like Windows, and there are, unfortunately, no HWR programs for Linux yet. If someone releases a HWR/sketch recognition package for Linux, Nokia will probably get my money.