View Full Version : Orchestra plays concert using e-music reader


Bob Russell
06-24-2006, 11:59 AM
Why just read books and listen to mp3s on an e-book reader? Now you can use a mobile reading device for sheet music.

The device is the MusicPad Pro (http://www.freehandsystems.com/products.html) which is a dedicated tablet PC which is 13.3" x 9.9" x 1.8" (just over 4 lbs) and with:
• 12.1" TFT LCD back-lit, color display
• 1024 x 768 resolution
• 64MB Flash memory, 128MB RAM
• 64MB Flash memory module
• Audio & Video out
• 2 USB ports (1 host, 1 device)
• Built-in jack for foot pedal

Some of the things the seller claims that this device will allow you to do:
• Store your entire music library
• Download nearly 50,000 digital music scores already formatted for the MusicPad Pro Plus from www.sunhawk.com
• Scan your music library into a computer and then convert
• Annotate with zoom in and zoom out feature feature while writing
• Add or erase rehearsal marks and notations
• Personal on screen color notes
• Use an extensive library of notation symbols
• Text annotation via a virtual keyboard

The California State University Long Beach Symphony Orchestra played a concert (http://www.freehandsystems.com/news/csulb.html) using this device. You can tell how this is still cutting edge technology by the fact that they boast the trial was "successful" and it was an event done once. If we were talking about a mature technology, there would be no need to even mention success, and the talk would be about the numbers of symphony orchestras already using it for every concert. But first things first.

"The concert, on April 28, 2006 was the first where all the musicians of a symphony orchestra performed using this new technology...The implementation of the product in a full symphonic concert environment is a part of FreeHand’s product marketing plan and helps confirm the validity of the concept of digital sheet music."

Via WorshipLeader (http://www.worshipleader.com/index.asp).

CommanderROR
06-24-2006, 05:44 PM
My former teacher once played in a concert where everybody was given a "digital music stand", a kind of laptop, and page-truning was managed using a foot-pedal.
This was 5-8 years ago. It worked in principle, but the page-turning sometimes didn't work right away and if you pressed the pedal twice it suddenly jumped over a page...

And what happens if the music stand falls over? Could be expensive...^^

I think this COULD work really well, but it'll need to be very bug-free before it becomes realistic to use this in the orchestra...I know what i'm talking about for a change...

mbmleone
04-12-2008, 12:32 PM
There is also an alternative system available called MusicReader. This is software that runs on standard Tablet PCs, laptops and desktops. This digital music stand (http://www.musicreader.net) is currently only available for Windows.

toymaker1
09-29-2009, 07:03 PM
Why just read books and listen to mp3s on an e-book reader? Now you can use a mobile reading device for sheet music.

The device is the MusicPad Pro (http://www.freehandsystems.com/products.html) which is a dedicated tablet PC which is 13.3" x 9.9" x 1.8" (just over 4 lbs) and with:
• 12.1" TFT LCD back-lit, color display
• 1024 x 768 resolution
• 64MB Flash memory, 128MB RAM
• 64MB Flash memory module
• Audio & Video out
• 2 USB ports (1 host, 1 device)
• Built-in jack for foot pedal

Some of the things the seller claims that this device will allow you to do:
• Store your entire music library
• Download nearly 50,000 digital music scores already formatted for the MusicPad Pro Plus from www.sunhawk.com
• Scan your music library into a computer and then convert
• Annotate with zoom in and zoom out feature feature while writing
• Add or erase rehearsal marks and notations
• Personal on screen color notes
• Use an extensive library of notation symbols
• Text annotation via a virtual keyboard

The California State University Long Beach Symphony Orchestra played a concert (http://www.freehandsystems.com/news/csulb.html) using this device. You can tell how this is still cutting edge technology by the fact that they boast the trial was "successful" and it was an event done once. If we were talking about a mature technology, there would be no need to even mention success, and the talk would be about the numbers of symphony orchestras already using it for every concert. But first things first.

"The concert, on April 28, 2006 was the first where all the musicians of a symphony orchestra performed using this new technology...The implementation of the product in a full symphonic concert environment is a part of FreeHand’s product marketing plan and helps confirm the validity of the concept of digital sheet music."

Via WorshipLeader (http://www.worshipleader.com/index.asp).

Hello
I have invented a similar music reader, but which can be releasably attached to a musical instrument. - just stick it in your pocket. Great for marching bands, jam sessions, busking etc.
UK Patent GB 2354 873B

Regards

WT Sharpe
09-29-2009, 09:48 PM
Now you can use a mobile reading device for sheet music.

MusicPad Pro

• Built-in jack for foot pedal



Can you turn pages with the foot pedal? That would be jammin'! (Forgive the musical pun.)

The only downside I can see to this is the $899.99 price tag.

nomesque
09-29-2009, 09:51 PM
Hmmm... shouldn't be too hard, in theory, to AUTOMATE page-turning based on input from the instrument in front of it... :chinscratch:

toymaker1
10-02-2009, 03:23 AM
My former teacher once played in a concert where everybody was given a "digital music stand", a kind of laptop, ... It worked in principle, ....but ....
what happens if the music stand falls over? Could be expensive...^^


With my music reading device (UK Patent GB2354873B) you dont need a music stand, because it clips onto the instrument, or you can clip it into a lyre. Problem solved!

regards