View Full Version : Intel shows UMPC/Origami preview


Bob Russell
03-07-2006, 02:45 PM
News.com got a sneak preview (http://news.com.com/2100-1044_3-6046793.html) of the UMPC devices that are the basis of Microsoft's Origami project. A slide show is available here (http://news.com.com/2300-1044_3-6046778-1.html).

Tuesday afternoon should have a full announcement and demonstration.

"As earlier reported, the first devices have a 7-inch touch screen, standard x86 processors, and can run full versions of desktop operating systems including the Windows XP variant being used for Origami.

In later generations, probably next year or later, the devices could have the pocket size, all-day battery life, and $500 price that Microsoft and Intel are aiming for, Graff said in an interview.

The first generation of devices are likely to get about three hours of battery life, he said."

Read the full article here (http://news.com.com/2100-1044_3-6046793.html).

Bob Russell
03-07-2006, 02:49 PM
There's apparently also some CNBC coverage on the devices...
http://www.gottabemobile.com/PermaLink,guid,7f76623b-81b0-4d31-be23-754b56f95b97.aspx

"Intel showed Ultra-Mobile PCs -- codename Origami -- to CNBC today. Here is what they said:

A highly anticipated device from Microsoft called Origami. Jim Goldman is holding a working Origami prototype, which our viewers are getting an exclusive first look at. There it is right now. That would be it on the left. Jim's on the right. Jim, tell us about it.

Indeed you're right, William. We are here in San Francisco at Intel's Developer Forum. 5,000 developers looking to see the latest and greatest from Intel and they need look no further than this.

This is what Intel calls the Ultra-Mobile PC or as many of us have grown to know it over the past several weeks, the Origami. A handheld computer with a large screen. Microsoft and various other manufacturers will be unveiling their versions of this Intel prototype this Thursday in Germany, but this gives you an idea of just how big or small, as the case may be, this device is. It's basically a complete personal computer running on an extremely low powered chip, so it's got really long battery life. It does everything your computer at home would do: download video, music, email, Internet connection. This is what every body is talking about."

Antoine of MMM
03-07-2006, 06:16 PM
Having being one who has taken his work environment from a full workstation to a tablet with the workstation as the file server, I can see this being a good idea. If the price is low, and there isnt too much in terms of a bottle neck with the operating speed, then this would work for a ton of folks.

For me personally, If it comes out, I just might get one and see about making the laptop that I am typing on now a file server, and my Treo the "device that can do everything in a pinch when i dont wanna carry a man purse" :D

Oh, I have read that battery life would be in the area of 3hrs for the first version. If it is 3hrs with wifi and BT on, then they have a heck of a sell. If not, then its no better than my 3 year old TC1000 that runs at 1GHZ with a transmeta processor and has a larger screen.

rlauzon
03-07-2006, 07:38 PM
Oh, I have read that battery life would be in the area of 3hrs for the first version. If it is 3hrs with wifi and BT on, then they have a heck of a sell. If not, then its no better than my 3 year old TC1000 that runs at 1GHZ with a transmeta processor and has a larger screen.

Hmmm... All the drawbacks of a laptop with fewer benefits of a laptop. That pretty much sums up tablet PCs in general so far.

I can see a niche groups who would really benefit from a tablet, but I don't see the value of a tablet for most people. For the price of a tablet, I can get a Sharp MM20 with WiFi and better battery life. Not a good value, IHMO.

Now, if they would lick the battery life issue, and make standard ones that have a more durable screen, then they might have something. But until then, I don't think they will catch on.

Antoine of MMM
03-07-2006, 09:13 PM
I agree in a sense, right now folks are too used to doing computing a certain way and so the idea of a tablet is a shift. If those compromises were minimized, then I can too see tablets taking off. Of course, in my case I like em, and use em. And so I am already switched :)

Laurens
03-08-2006, 02:25 AM
Ho-hum.

Jaapjan
03-08-2006, 02:42 AM
They look nice.. but I do not want them. I have no idea what I should or would be doing with them anyway. I doubt I can very well run my compilers on it with any decent speed. Let alone manipulate any files with a pen. My handwriting is absolutely non-existant. I very much prefer a keyboard, which is highly pleasant for any sort of large texts you need to input. Though admittedly there are novel pen-input mechanisms.

Basic fact is, I would not use it for anything except reading and for that is kind of sucks. Three hours might be enough to read a book however so maybe I am wrong. Still, I cannot help but be almost sure that an eink screen would be much easier on my eyes.

doctorow
03-08-2006, 05:56 AM
Despite all the nice buzz marketing campaign over the last few weeks, I think the Origami falls short. It's too small to replace my laptop and too big to replace my PDA.

rlauzon
03-08-2006, 06:10 AM
Despite all the nice buzz marketing campaign over the last few weeks, I think the Origami falls short. It's too small to replace my laptop and too big to replace my PDA.

That just made me realize: the trend for PDAs (or at least the converged "smart" phones) seems to be to make them a little bigger and give them a small keyboard.

So it seems strange that someone would think that a smaller laptop without a keyboard would be in demand.

Bob Russell
03-08-2006, 06:18 AM
I don't think this device is supposed to replace either smartphones or notebooks. Not even things like the OQO. We'll hear more about it today, but it's probably aimed at keeping some data with you, and having internet access, and be able to use "light" XP programs on the go (not heavy crunching). Multimedia with a good sized screen also.

Battery life will go way up fast. All day is the goal. And prices will come down. This is the first entry into a new computing category between notebooks and pdas, and while it may not be for everyone, I think we can all agree that it has a place.

The real question is what kind of software MS will give it, and what sort of uses they envision for it!

Jaapjan
03-08-2006, 07:34 AM
If it really does have wireless capabilities in it, and those 3 hours include it to be operating all the time during those 3 hours, then I would prefer it running some sort of remote desktop. Perhaps.

I really do not know. I have not considered much these sort of devices.

jah
03-08-2006, 08:16 AM
My Vaio TX1 laptop only weighs 1.25kg, has 60gb disk and 6.5hr battery life. So the Origami should be capable of 6-8hr battery life now! I agree with other posters about the positioning of the Origami given many people have cellphones, laptops/PCs. I have noticed here in the Uk that teenagers are buying laptops and having your own laptop is trendy. Okay laptops can be purchased for GBP600, which is condsidered to be reasonable. The Origami will need to be around GBP300 for it to be compelling against the latest laptops.

Laurens
03-08-2006, 08:34 AM
My Vaio TX1 laptop only weighs 1.25kg, has 60gb disk and 6.5hr battery life. So the Origami should be capable of 6-8hr battery life now! I agree with other posters about the positioning of the Origami given many people have cellphones, laptops/PCs. I have noticed here in the Uk that teenagers are buying laptops and having your own laptop is trendy. Okay laptops can be purchased for GBP600, which is condsidered to be reasonable. The Origami will need to be around GBP300 for it to be compelling against the latest laptops.

I agree that spec-wise the Origami is underwhelming. (Esp. the battery life) But I don't think tablets are competing with laptops, just as high-end handhelds or phones are not competing with laptops. They're intended for different usage. Time will tell whether tablets will be able to carve out their own niche.

Bob Russell
03-08-2006, 01:15 PM
Gizmodo is asking if the Origami devices are just another media player, but now with really bad DRM.
http://us.gizmodo.com/gadgets/portable-media/rumors-origami-just-a-glorified-media-player-with-nasty-drm-159153.php

I'm more optimistic than that, partly because there's a much greater opportunity out there for this type of hardware, and partly because it runs WinXP so it will be able to do a lot even if it's only targeted for PIM, games and media in the beginning.

rmeister0
03-08-2006, 02:37 PM
Well, a media player that runs the full Win32 stack is a much more versatile media player.

I am amused by all the negative comments about what it can't do, not taking into account what it is designed to do. Microsoft needs to define the target market better, but I don't think the fact that it makes a poor development box or isn't a full laptop replacement doesn't mean the concept is flawed. It just means the concept isn't for you.

I reserve judgement until more facts are in. If I can get most of the benefits I get from the Lifebook P1510 tablet ultraportable, but for half the price and a further reduction in weight, then I am all for it.