View Full Version : Adobe DRM - any progress?


BasilC
12-29-2008, 07:13 PM
Revisiting this forum after a long absence, I get the impression that things haven't really moved on with Adobe ebooks. As I recall, the situation a while back was as follows:

a) You can no longer download them, instead you have to connect to the "Cloud" using the dreaded Adobe Digital Editions

b) There are still big problems with authorising computers and with Adobe mistaking a single computer for multiple computers, as a result of which you find yourself unable to read ebooks that you have paid for

c) It's no longer possible to read these books on PDAs (in my case a Palm TX.

Unfortunately, my interests tend towards the more serious side and the books I would like to read aren't available in Mobipocket or eReader, both of which work well on Palm devices. And even discounting the fairly new problems arising from the introduction of Digital Editions, only text-only PDFs with no funny foreign letters can easily be read on a Palm (thanks to Mobipocket and RepliGo). You can forget about books with tables or graphs etc. While eReader and Mobipocket seem to be able to deal with these pretty well.

Could forum members please update me? Is the situation still the same? If so, is there any prospect of persuading the publishers who use Adobe to switch to more more user-friendly format?

Finally, I know that the Kindle, Sony Reader etc are supposedly wonderful, but I want a multipurpose device that I can put in my pocket. And I'm dismayed by all the new formats that tie you down to specific hardware.

Happy New Year to all.

wallcraft
12-29-2008, 07:27 PM
For technical ebooks, the way forward seems to be ePub. However, currently most ePubs also have Adobe DRM and require Adobe Digital Editions. FictionWise has indicated that eReader will add ePub support (including eReader DRM for ePub) next year. If the reason Adobe ePub is becoming popular is ePub (rather than a working DRM scheme), then eReader ePub may be our path to technical ebooks on handheld devices.