View Full Version : Interesting difference between Kindle and 505 screens


mdibella
12-13-2007, 01:34 PM
I have had my Sony Reader long enough to have developed a rhythm while reading/turning the page. I hit the button, move my eyes up the screen, and rest them for a smidgen of time while the page finishes refreshing.

I noticed when reading my Kindle that my customary rhythm was not working as well. Took a few minutes to figure out why, but here it is...

The Sony refreshes the screen by paging forward, blinking dark, blinking light. The Kindle refreshes by blinking dark, blinking light, and THEN paging forward.

It is a bit disconcerting because I am accustomed (with the Sony) to seeing the new page immediately (albeit it is blinking) but with the Kindle I do not see it until the screen has finished its refresh.

It is not a huge big deal and I am probably being nit picky but it is a noticeable difference that will take some getting used to...gotta wonder why the difference if the screens are made by the same company...

Alisa
12-13-2007, 02:28 PM
They're using different controllers, no? I would imagine this ordering would still be controllable in software, though.

JSWolf
12-13-2007, 02:29 PM
Yes, they are using different screen controllers. That is why the Sony gets 8 shades and the Kindle only 4.

Zoot
12-13-2007, 02:36 PM
This is probably more the reader application software than the controller though.

Z.

Alisa
12-13-2007, 02:39 PM
Yep. I'm thinking it's more just what order they're choosing to call things in the API than the actual hardware.

mdibella
12-13-2007, 02:43 PM
You are probably right, Alisa. I guess I prefer the Sony's method because I must be reading a word or two of the new page while it is still blinking, without even realizing I am doing it.

Wish they were consistent...

HarryT
12-14-2007, 03:53 AM
All the eInk readers do screen refreshes in a slightly different "sequence" of blanks and flashes. Must be controlled by the software.

Zoot
12-19-2007, 02:26 PM
I've apparently adapted to this screen refresh difference and now automatically hit the next page button a second or so before I'm done reading the current page. Rather than reading the first words on the next page "early" as might happen with the Sony redraw sequence, I just read the last words on the old page "late" as the page change is actually happening. The result is that I never feel I have to wait for the display to catch up. Reading is a smooth and continuous process that's not appreciably interrupted by the page turning process. It's certainly less intrusive than turning pages in a paper book.

Z.

edsohsmith
12-20-2007, 02:26 PM
Has anyone who is familiar with both machines noticed any difference in contrast or page turning speeds for the two screens? I know the screens are physically the same, but the do the software drivers make any / much of a difference?

mdibella
12-21-2007, 09:14 AM
I would say the time delay is about the same for both.

ginolee
12-21-2007, 04:47 PM
You know this got me to thinking about the "screen refresh" rate for paperback books. It usually takes a good second or two to turn the page. The entire "screen" gets all blurry and hard to read during that page turn.

You would think after hundreds of years, they would have improved the page refresh rate on these paperback books. ;).

Seriously, the Kindle page turning refresh is a non-issue for me. I usually blink or look away for a second, and it probably helps me rest my eyes a bit.

And also, if you think about it, paperback book technology is not too great. After 20-30 years, the paper probably gets all yellowed and discolored from exposure to varying levels of humidity and dust. And personally, I find it a bit annoying to have to keep the pages pressed back during the entire reading process. And if the book is thick, it's awkward to hold for long periods of time.

Hey, in reference to a thread elsewhere on this site about DRM, do you think the publishers would offer to replace yellowed, tattered copies of paperback books with new ones for free? After all, paperback books should last forever, right ?

Gino.

mdibella
12-28-2007, 10:48 AM
I don't really have a problem with the screen refresh either, I am quite used to it. My original point was just that the refresh process on the two readers is different and so being accustomed to one did not mean the other would not be jarring.

At this point I am used to both of them, so it is no problem. 8-)

JMikeD
03-28-2009, 10:30 PM
Yes, they are using different screen controllers. That is why the Sony gets 8 shades and the Kindle only 4.

The Kindle 2 gets 16 shades of grey.

Mike

lilac_jive
03-28-2009, 10:34 PM
The Kindle 2 gets 16 shades of grey.

Mike

This thread is from 2007, before Kindle 2.


But interesting, because I never noticed this.

JMikeD
03-28-2009, 10:38 PM
Wow, how did that show up at the top of my list? I didn't notice the thread was so old, I thought it was new since it was at the top of the listings.

Mike

lilac_jive
03-28-2009, 10:39 PM
Wow, how did that show up at the top of my list? I didn't notice the thread was so old, I thought it was new since it was at the top of the listings.

Mike

Poltergeists?

Was it in usercp?

KarlB
03-29-2009, 08:53 PM
You know this got me to thinking about the "screen refresh" rate for paperback books. It usually takes a good second or two to turn the page. The entire "screen" gets all blurry and hard to read during that page turn.

Gino.

Good point. I'll try to remember that before I complain about eInk refresh rates again. :)

This reminds me of a young woman I once saw reading a paperback on a bus. She held the book open with one hand, and had a masterful technique of turning the pages using just the thumb of her book-holding hand. Not only that, but she flipped the page every thirty seconds or so. It was one of the sexiest things I've ever seen in my life. ;)

JMikeD
03-29-2009, 10:45 PM
You mean everybody doesn’t do that? :)

Mike

rcuadro
03-30-2009, 02:53 AM
You know... I knew that something was different but I did not actually notice what it was until I read this :)