View Full Version : Good post-apocalyptic novels in ebook format?


jfrancis
12-04-2007, 05:12 PM
Hi Guys,

I was wondering if anyone had a line on some good post-apocalyptic novels (i.e. post WW III, plague, meteor strike, etc.) that can be had in eBook format? I've really liked Stephen King's "The Stand," and I enjoyed "Lucifer's Hammer" (Larry Niven) as well. I've also read Cormac McCarthy's "The Road" and it was okay, too.

Thanks for any suggestions!

Regards,
John Francis

Hadrien
12-04-2007, 06:25 PM
You can try "After London": http://www.feedbooks.com/discover/view_book/1986

ichard Jefferies fits right in with writers like Wordsworth and William Morris in their distrust of, if not outright disdain for, civilization and how “progress” was steadily destroying and perverting everything England once represented. In After London, Jefferies depicts an England 100 years on from a great cataclysm (never specified) that utterly devastated London and rooted what society was left back into a Medieval way of life, foreshadowing Morris’ News from Nowhere, which also would see the post-apocalyptic future as a return to the pastoral. After London is divided into two sections, the first of which is a sort of taxonomy of the eventual plants, animals, tribes, and landscape that emerged over the first generation or two “after London.” Jefferies shows a gift for this type of cataloguing, especially when recounting how relentless nature was in sweeping away all the remains of “progress” left after the destruction—roads, bridges, cities—and when describing the new order of human society. Bushmen and Gipsies live nomadic and larcenous lives, while a new nobility based on literacy emerges to reestablish the feudal system. Jefferies’ hatred of all things progressive really comes out in his account of the fate of London; once the Thames clogged with debris and reduced the site to marsh, centuries of trash, waste, and the dead—“the rottenness of 1000 years”—combine to create what could be called a Victorian Superfund site—the ground becomes sludgy and a poisonous mist overhangs the area. No one can hazard a visit unless he has a death wish. The second section of the book is a more pedestrian fantasy of a young nobleman named Felix Aquila who makes a name for himself by exploring the wild lands of England and uniting shepherd tribes under his kingship; this section is quite readable however, and chapters 22-24 give an account of his journey into the area that once was London—these passages portray a land as strange and unfamiliar as anything out of William Hope Hodgson.

"The Last Man" from Mary Shelley: http://www.feedbooks.com/discover/view_book/1347

"The Star" from HG Wells: http://www.feedbooks.com/discover/view_book/607

“The Star” is the first story I know of that treats the subject of a heavenly object wreaking destruction on the earth. A planet beyond Neptune (Pluto being unknown at this time) collides with that planet, jolting both out of orbit and on a course toward the sun. An astronomer labors over some calculations and comes to a devastating conclusion: the conjoined planets will come so close to the earth that life will be wiped out: “Man has lived in vain.” As the object gets closer, brighter, and hotter, people embrace religion, head for high ground, or scoff at the idea of the end of the world. More primitive peoples have had the right idea all along though—new bright “stars” in the heavens portend disaster. Wells, as he invariably does, predicts disater with uncanny accuracy: “Earthquakes, volcanic outbreaks, cyclones, sea waves, floods, and a steady rise in temperature to I know not what limit”—sounds like the environmental holocausts predicted for us today, does it not? Wells spares humanity in the end, or at least a small remnant of it, and those left attempt to slowly rebuild civilization. In a foreshadowing of the next year’s War of the Worlds however, the last paragraph of the story informs us that Martian astronomers watched the event with the keenest interest but with no sympathy: “how small the vastest human catastrophes may seem, at a distance of a few million miles.”

AlexC
12-04-2007, 06:40 PM
I was going to recommend A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter Miller, Jr. and Deus Irae by Phillip K. Dick and Roger Zelazny, but they don't appear to be available electronically. Ah, what the heck. They're classics, grab them from the library!

Penforhire
12-04-2007, 06:45 PM
Try browsing "post-apocalyptic" tag results at Amazon.

BenG
12-04-2007, 07:13 PM
I'm not sure if they are available as ebooks but here'sa few:
I Am Legend by Richard Mathieson
Earth Abides by George Stewart
City by Clifford Simak
A Boy and His Dog by Harlan Ellison
The Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler
Rebirth by John Wyndham
Death of Grass by John Christopher
Dhalgren by Samuel Delaney
The Night Lands by William Hope Hodgeson (available here on Mobileread)

wallcraft
12-04-2007, 11:47 PM
The Night Lands by William Hope Hodgeson (available here on Mobileread) I have read the rest of your exellent list, but had not heard of this one. It is actually Hodgson, William Hope: The Night Land. v1, 28 Apr 07 (http://www.mobileread.com/forums/showthread.php?t=10612) and it is, unfortunately, not currently available in MOBI.

Darqref
12-05-2007, 12:31 AM
Hi Guys,

I was wondering if anyone had a line on some good post-apocalyptic novels (i.e. post WW III, plague, meteor strike, etc.) that can be had in eBook format? I've really liked Stephen King's "The Stand," and I enjoyed "Lucifer's Hammer" (Larry Niven) as well. I've also read Cormac McCarthy's "The Road" and it was okay, too.

Thanks for any suggestions!

Regards,
John Francis

Depending on just how far post-apocalypse you're talking about, You might try the John Ringo series that starts with "There Will Be Dragons" from Baen Books. Sort of a combo of "Everything falls" with "technology might as well be magic".

And you're in luck, it's in the Baen Free Library. The rest of the series will cost some money, though.

BenG
12-05-2007, 07:04 AM
I have read the rest of your exellent list, but had not heard of this one. It is actually Hodgson, William Hope: The Night Land. v1, 28 Apr 07 (http://www.mobileread.com/forums/showthread.php?t=10612) and it is, unfortunately, not currently available in MOBI.
I think the text is available at Project Gutenberg.

Actually it takes place millions of years in the future so it may not be strictly post-apocalyptic. For me it was a chore to get through some passages but ultimately it was worth the effort.

I'm currently working on the Darkness and Dawn trilogy by George Allan England, which takes place after the fall of civilization. I'll post it later this week.

Hadrien
12-05-2007, 07:42 AM
I think the text is available at Project Gutenberg.

Actually it takes place millions of years in the future so it may not be strictly post-apocalyptic. For me it was a chore to get through some passages but ultimately it was worth the effort.

I'm currently working on the Darkness and Dawn trilogy by George Allan England, which takes place after the fall of civilization. I'll post it later this week.

The Darkness and Dawn trilogy ? It was also recently uploaded on Feedbooks:

The Last New Yorkers: http://www.feedbooks.com/discover/view_book/1990
Beyond the Great Oblivion: http://www.feedbooks.com/discover/view_book/1991
The Afterglow: http://www.feedbooks.com/discover/view_book/1992

Xenophon
12-05-2007, 02:14 PM
For some other variants on post-apocalyptic fiction, try:

"Brain Wave" by Poul Anderson
"Godspeed" by Charles Sheffield
"The Forlorn" by Dave Freer
"Simply Human" by L. Warren Douglas
"Off Armageddon Reef" by David Weber
"A Hymn Before Battle" by John Ringo

I'm not sure whether the first two are available in bits, but the others can all be found at Baen's Webscriptions site. I note that I've taken a rather expansive definition of 'post-apocalyptic' -- some of these (The Forlorn, Off Armageddon Reef') involve the near-destruction of humanity with a few survivors on some other planet. Or the 'apocalypse' isn't quite what you might think (Brain Wave). Or the author actually kills off 95%+ of humanity on-screen during the course of the series (the Ringo 'Posleen' series starting with 'A Hymn Before Battle', which begins with everything seeming hunky-dory).

Xenophon

nekokami
12-05-2007, 04:10 PM
Asimov edited a collection of short fiction called (appropriately enough) Catastrophes, which started with stories about the destruction of the universe and gradually wound down to the mere destruction of human civilization. I don't know of any electronic copies, but if you can find it in used paper, it's worth picking up.

Azayzel
12-05-2007, 05:03 PM
and if you want fast action and a simple plot, you can try... James Axler's Outlanders or Deathlands series. There are a ton of books in each series and they read really quick. I usually pick up one of them when I want a quick read with some crazy action. :thumbsup:

slayda
12-05-2007, 06:29 PM
My favorite & the first book I read when I was young that started me really reading is Starman's Son, 2250 AD (©1952) by Andre Norton.

Andanzas
12-08-2007, 04:43 PM
I really enjoyed Parable of the Sower and the trilogy Lilith's Brood (its original title was Xenogenesis), both by Octavia E. Butler, but I can't find digital versions. :(

Parable of the Sower takes place in the immediate future, in a California whose economy is devastated by global warming (water is so expensive that being dirty becomes fashionable). Lilith's Brood takes place after a nuclear war; a mysterious race of aliens help the few survivors to rebuild their lives... but according to those aliens' rules.

Sparrow
12-08-2007, 04:56 PM
The finest example of a post-apocalyptic novel I ever read was John Steinbeck's "Grapes of Wrath".

From an SF pov, John Wyndham and John Christopher both wrote recommendable post-apocalyptic books.

andyafro
12-09-2007, 03:54 PM
1/ The Road - Cormac McCarthy
2/ World War Z - Max Brooks
3/ I Am Legend - Richard Matheson
4/ Autofac - Philip K Dick
5/ Autumn Series - David Moody
6/ Cell - Stephen King

jfrancis
12-12-2007, 01:49 PM
This should keep me busy for awhile!

Regards,
John Francis

TadW
12-16-2007, 04:20 AM
Not necessarily "post-apocalyptic", but definitely "speculative" is this top of 2007 list by Pat's Fantasy:

1- Black Man/Thirteen by Richard Morgan (Del Rey/Gollancz)
2- Reaper's Gale by Steven Erikson (Tor Books/Bantam Press)
3- Ink by Hal Duncan (Del Rey/Pan MacMillan)
4- Brasyl by Ian McDonald (Pyr/Gollancz)
5- Ysabel by Guy Gavriel Kay (Penguin Books/Simon & Schuster)
6- The Terror by Dan Simmons (Little, Brown and co./Bantam Press)
7- Dreamsongs, Volume 1 by George R. R. Martin (Bantam Dell/Gollancz)
8- Red Seas under Red Skies by Scott Lynch (Bantam Dell/Gollancz)
9- Fatal Revenant by Stephen R. Donaldson (Putnam/Gollancz)
10- Empire of Ivory by Naomi Novik (Del Rey/Voyager)

http://fantasyhotlist.blogspot.com/2007/12/top-10-speculative-fiction-titles.html

BenG
12-16-2007, 06:40 AM
Also there's Stephen Vincent Benet's short story, "By The Waters of Babylon".
Written in 1937 it was inspired, not by the atomic bomb, but by 1937 bombing of Guernica, in which Fascist military forces destroyed the majority of the Basque town of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War.
You can read it online at http://www.tkinter.smig.net/Outings/RosemountGhosts/Babylon.htm

Alexander Turcic
12-16-2007, 07:12 AM
Right now I am reading Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood. Wonderful literature portraying a bleak future that may not be too far from now.

http://www.amazon.com/Oryx-Crake-Margaret-Atwood/dp/0385721676/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1197803488&sr=8-1

ggendel
12-16-2007, 10:37 AM
I slugged through Samuel Delaney's "Einstein Intersection" and "Dhalgren" and have to say that I just didn't get it. In fact, I think that Dhalgren was the only book that I put down with 50 pages to go and never went back.

Unless there was some background reading that I needed to do first, these books must be an "insider's" story since I couldn't put the pieces together, and I really tried.

Gary

nekokami
12-16-2007, 12:28 PM
Bah. Firefox just interpreted a random keystroke as a "back" command and lost the post I was working on.

The Gate to Women's Country is a post-apocalyptic book by Sherri Tepper that might appeal to fans of Margaret Atwood.

I also recommend The Clowns of God, by Morris West. Sadly, it's not available as an ebook, as far as I know. But it's a very interesting look at the kind of nuclear hysteria that was in the back of all our minds during the Cold War, from the point of view of a Pope who receives a vision of the coming of World War III -- and gets forced out of the Church hierarchy as a result. Recommended for those who liked A Canticle for Liebowitz.

tompe
12-21-2007, 07:58 PM
3- Ink by Hal Duncan (Del Rey/Pan MacMillan)


I think you have to read Vellum before Ink to really appreciate it. Reading Vellum and Ink was at least an experience. I have not yet decided if the books were good or not...

carld
12-23-2007, 02:15 PM
I'm currently reading City at World's End (http://www.mobileread.com/forums/search.php?searchid=469169) by Edmund Hamilton, available right here thanks to JSWolf. It's the story of a 1940s (I think) mid-west town thrown millions or billions of years into the future to an empty and dying Earth. It's got a post-apocalyptic feel to it, though it's not really in that genre. Fair warning though: Hamilton's view of women is old-fashioned to the point of being quaint or offensive, but it's an interesting read if you can overlook that part.

hogleg
12-26-2007, 06:11 AM
I'm writing one. I'll let you know how it tuns out.

Over
05-21-2008, 07:18 PM
Try the Vampire Earth series, by E. E. Knight

Hadrien
05-21-2008, 07:38 PM
I've created a list of books available on Feedbooks for apocalypse/post-apocalypse: http://www.feedbooks.com/list/view/64

badgoodDeb
05-21-2008, 09:46 PM
How about some DURING apocalyptic books. I bought these in ereader for Palm, 4 years ago so they should still be available in other formats too:
ChristCloneTrilogy by James BeauSeigneur
1- In His Image
2- Birth of an Age
3- Acts of God

thijso
05-23-2008, 04:32 AM
I found the series starting with Dies the Fire by S.M. Stirling quite good fun. The companion series starting with Island in the Sea of Time is also ok, but is alternate history, rather than post-apocalyptic.

I have seen the Dies the Fire stuff as e-books somewhere...

wayrad
05-23-2008, 07:51 AM
Leigh Brackett, The Long Tomorrow
David Palmer, Emergence
Sterling Lanier, Hiero's Journey

Lemurion
05-23-2008, 08:29 AM
Leigh Brackett, The Long Tomorrow
David Palmer, Emergence
Sterling Lanier, Hiero's Journey

I second David Palmer's Emergence and the very long awaited sequel is being serialized in Analog (available electronically from Fictionwise) starting with the July issue which should be out any day now.

Also (and I don't know if this is available electronically) look for Pat Frank's Alas, Babylon, one of the best in the genre, I've read it a dozen times over the last three decades. Yes it's dated, but it's very very good.

nekokami
05-23-2008, 06:18 PM
I second David Palmer's Emergence and the very long awaited sequel is being serialized in Analog (available electronically from Fictionwise) starting with the July issue which should be out any day now.
Wow! Now I'll need to subscribe to Analog (via Fictionwise, of course)! I always wondered what ever happened to Palmer. Two books, then poof, gone. :(

wayrad
05-24-2008, 09:46 AM
One could almost argue one book, then poof...Threshold was pretty bad, I thought. Great news about the Emergence sequel, though! I hope he's back on form.

Lobolover
05-24-2008, 10:08 AM
Well,Hodgsons night land is a very interesting,if somewhat LONG and a tad bit tedious fantastic book of a post apocalyptic sort.

nekokami
05-26-2008, 12:26 PM
One could almost argue one book, then poof...Threshold was pretty bad, I thought. Great news about the Emergence sequel, though! I hope he's back on form.
No argument there. I admit I'm somewhat hesitant to read Schrödinger's Frisbee, assuming he finds a publisher. I'll try Tracking, though, because I liked Emergence so much.

wayrad
05-26-2008, 04:56 PM
No argument there. I admit I'm somewhat hesitant to read Schrödinger's Frisbee, assuming he finds a publisher. I'll try Tracking, though, because I liked Emergence so much.Schrodinger's Frisbee? I thought the new titles were Tracking and Special Education - of course titles often do change before publication. I'm kind of wondering where he will go with the Emergence storyline now.

ZenEngineer
05-26-2008, 07:09 PM
Hi Guys,

I was wondering if anyone had a line on some good post-apocalyptic novels (i.e. post WW III, plague, meteor strike, etc.) that can be had in eBook format? I've really liked Stephen King's "The Stand," and I enjoyed "Lucifer's Hammer" (Larry Niven) as well. I've also read Cormac McCarthy's "The Road" and it was okay, too.

Thanks for any suggestions!

Regards,
John Francis

Check out the fiction section of Frugal Squirrels:
http://www.frugalsquirrels.com/vb/forumdisplay.php?f=131

There is a lot of Post Apocalyptic World fiction, especially by Jerry D. Young, that tries to inform and teach about preparedness and disaster. All the stories are HTML, but you should be able to save and convert to your reader format.

nekokami
05-27-2008, 03:58 PM
Schrodinger's Frisbee? I thought the new titles were Tracking and Special Education - of course titles often do change before publication. I'm kind of wondering where he will go with the Emergence storyline now. (edited to remove spoilers)

Um... spoilers?

Schrödinger's Frisbee is a different book that he just finished. Not even picked up by a publisher yet, much less for sale.

wayrad
05-27-2008, 09:02 PM
Um... spoilers?Oops, sorry; I've edited my post.

pshrynk
06-02-2008, 06:57 PM
My favorite & the first book I read when I was young that started me really reading is Starman's Son, 2250 AD (©1952) by Andre Norton.
Love that book and would do pretty much anything to find an e-copy!

The Skwerl
06-02-2008, 09:05 PM
James Axler - The Deathland Series Those are fun to read.

Vesper
06-03-2008, 12:10 AM
Love that book and would do pretty much anything to find an e-copy!

Hmm...what should I ask for? :chinscratch:

http://www.webscription.net/p-97-darkness-and-dawn.aspx

DrS

Tenpit
09-04-2008, 08:21 PM
Just finished reading 'Last Light' by Alex Scarrow.

A gripping read and definitely one I would recommend. Not sure if it is available as an eBook, had a quick scan and can't find it.

mazzeltjes
09-04-2008, 08:29 PM
Leigh Brackett, The Long Tomorrow
David Palmer, Emergence
Sterling Lanier, Hiero's Journey

Sterling Lanier, Hiero's Journey and it's sequel
The Unforsaken Hiero are among my faves
It's a pity Lanier never finished the series
Eternity Road by Jack McDevitt
is a pretty good story as well

Robotech_Master
09-04-2008, 09:45 PM
I am seriously surprised nobody's yet mentioned the Survivalist series by Jerry Ahern. It's a really amazing series, and manages to transcend the "men's adventure" stuff it starts out as into honest-to-gawd science-fictional territory. Now, granted, the politics of the author are somewhat rightist or libertarianish and they show through in his writing, but the story is compelling enough that it's forgivable for the most part.

Sadly, I can't find anywhere they are currently legitimately available as e-books. I snapped them all up when eReader was selling them (back when it called itself Peanut Press) but the only stuff that comes up on Google right now is torrents.

mazzeltjes
09-05-2008, 09:41 AM
I am seriously surprised nobody's yet mentioned the Survivalist series by Jerry Ahern. It's a really amazing series, and manages to transcend the "men's adventure" stuff it starts out as into honest-to-gawd science-fictional territory. Now, granted, the politics of the author are somewhat rightist or libertarianish and they show through in his writing, but the story is compelling enough that it's forgivable for the most part.

Sadly, I can't find anywhere they are currently legitimately available as e-books. I snapped them all up when eReader was selling them (back when it called itself Peanut Press) but the only stuff that comes up on Google right now is torrents.

Ahern is so far to the right
that he can see hitler on the left
The books are a glorification of weapons and violence and badly written.

A typical opening scene from the books would be something like this:

John Rourke pulled up the zipper on the fly of his Levis with his right hand,
his left moving across his body plane to the Detonics stainless under his right
armpit in the double Alessi rig, his fingers knotting around the black checkered
rubber Pachmayr grips, his left thumb poised to cock the .45 as soon as it
cleared the leather. He gave the pistol a short, firm tug, hearing the speed
break through the trigger guard unsnap. His thumb jerked back the hammer.
etc.etc. etc.

I most definitely would not recommend these books to anyone
it might give science fiction a bad name

Dr. Drib
09-05-2008, 10:00 AM
Well,Hodgsons night land is a very interesting,if somewhat LONG and a tad bit tedious fantastic book of a post apocalyptic sort.

I agree with you (perhaps for the first time, Lobolover :):)).

"The Night Land" is an incredible book, couched within the framework of an apocalyptic world and written in an artfully archaic style. It's compelling reading (for me, anyway); I've read it three times and have thoroughly enjoyed each read. (I must add that it strikes me more as a horror novel. It's style and length prohibits easy consumption. It's available here on MobileRead, if you care to see how it 'reads.')

William Hope Hodgson was a master of horror and a very literary writer. Much of horror fiction (in my opinion), is potboiler fiction -- a good read and entertaining, but with not much more beyond a surface gloss.

Don

vsalvaggio
09-07-2008, 03:30 PM
Depending on just how far post-apocalypse you're talking about, You might try the John Ringo series that starts with "There Will Be Dragons" from Baen Books. Sort of a combo of "Everything falls" with "technology might as well be magic".

And you're in luck, it's in the Baen Free Library. The rest of the series will cost some money, though.

I'll second this recommendation and add that the whole series can be found for FREE:
"There Will be Dragons" & "Emerald Sea" are in the Baen Free Library and "Against the Tide" and "East of the Sun, West of the Moon" (along with the first two books) are on Baen CD 11-Unto the Breach and can be found here: http://baencd.thefifthimperium.com/

Ordinaryuser
09-08-2008, 03:21 PM
I am seriously surprised nobody's yet mentioned the Survivalist series by Jerry Ahern. It's a really amazing series, and manages to transcend the "men's adventure" stuff it starts out as into honest-to-gawd science-fictional territory. Now, granted, the politics of the author are somewhat rightist or libertarianish and they show through in his writing, but the story is compelling enough that it's forgivable for the most part.

Sadly, I can't find anywhere they are currently legitimately available as e-books. I snapped them all up when eReader was selling them (back when it called itself Peanut Press) but the only stuff that comes up on Google right now is torrents.

Thanks for the recommendation. It sounds interesting to anyone who is familiar with weapons. I enjoy fiction from either side of the aisle (left or right) and it sounds like at least the writer at least has some factual knowledge of how pistol's work. So many hollywood "type" writers obviously don't know their subject matter, and glaring errors show up in their shootem- ups.

Robotech_Master
09-08-2008, 03:27 PM
Thanks for the recommendation. It sounds interesting to anyone who is familiar with weapons. I enjoy fiction from either side of the aisle (left or right) and it sounds like at least the writer at least has some factual knowledge of how pistol's work. So many hollywood "type" writers obviously don't know their subject matter, and glaring errors show up in their shootem- ups.
Yeah, you could say that (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Ahern). I'm particularly amused that he eventually served as the President of Detonics, the firearms company whose guns his protagonist carried. Reminds me of the old Remington ads with Victor Kiam, "I liked it so much, I bought the company."

Nate the great
09-08-2008, 03:35 PM
Ahern is so far to the right
that he can see hitler on the left


That wouldn't be very hard. Hitler was the leader of a fairly liberal party, after all.

nekokami
09-08-2008, 03:48 PM
The Postman, by David Brin (or at least the portion that appeared in Asimov's in 1982). Except that it's apparently not available as a commercial ebook. :rolleyes:

Anyone know when Bantam might really get into ebooks, not just re-publish classics? Looks like they're part of Random House, which does seem to at least acknowledge the existance of ebooks on their website....

mazzeltjes
09-09-2008, 02:47 PM
That wouldn't be very hard. Hitler was the leader of a fairly liberal party, after all.

:rofl::rofl::rofl:

stustaff
09-10-2008, 10:55 AM
No one has reccomended "the fall" Crazy! ;)

here it is a great book this only read the first in the series so far.

Every coin has two sides. As a young boy, Mewth learned he was destined for great acts - a child of God, but would he be called upon to demonstrate God's mercy or wrath? Some forty years later, on the brink of World War III in the Middle East, a resigned Mewth realizes the hand he's been dealt. Thousands of miles away, in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, the coin is flipped. Phoenix, a young man prophesized to be the second coming, has been locked away and kept a secret from the world. As the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse sweep across the Earth, they bring terrible destruction and a transformation no holy book could have predicted. Phoenix, only just discovering the world he must save, becomes the leader of humanity. He and his new friends, the survivors, must usher in a new era of life on Earth, or let it succumb to God's End.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/026-1466088-8126828?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books-uk&field-author=Michael%20McBride

izmi
10-05-2008, 06:57 PM
I am surprised nobody has suggested it. It's a sci-fi classic and a must-read for everybody. The Day of the Triffids, by John Wyndham. It's quite old, but has aged amazingly, and doesn't seem overly out of touch with today.

Also, if you like post-apocalytpic, you might aslo want to try dystopian literature. I love both genres, and now officially love this thread, as it's hard to find good p-a literature.

Over
10-05-2008, 08:31 PM
Try the Vampire Earth series, by E. E. Knight

BTW, don't let the "vampire" word misguide you. It's a very good series. Anyone read it here?

askyn
10-05-2008, 10:51 PM
I really enjoyed Parable of the Sower and the trilogy Lilith's Brood (its original title was Xenogenesis), both by Octavia E. Butler, but I can't find digital versions. :(

Parable of the Sower takes place in the immediate future, in a California whose economy is devastated by global warming (water is so expensive that being dirty becomes fashionable). Lilith's Brood takes place after a nuclear war; a mysterious race of aliens help the few survivors to rebuild their lives... but according to those aliens' rules.

Check out fictionwise for Liliths Brood, I know for sure they have it there in ebook as I just bought it. Not sure of the other

HappyMartin
10-06-2008, 06:48 AM
I read Refuge over the last weekend and enjoyed it. More than a fair price and fair deal, pay if you like the book, $1.80. I did and I did. Well worth the money.

Hadrien
10-06-2008, 08:17 AM
If it's post-apocalyptic you're after, can I puff my own latest novel, Refuge (http://www.richardherley.com/RF.html)?

*ducks*

I've added your book to the Apocalypse/Post-Apocalypse list Richard: http://www.feedbooks.com/list/64

BruceB
10-06-2008, 08:24 AM
"On The Beach" - Neville Shute
"The Last Ship" - William Brinkley

Richard Herley
10-06-2008, 11:16 AM
I read Refuge over the last weekend and enjoyed it. More than a fair price and fair deal, pay if you like the book, $1.80. I did and I did. Well worth the money.Thank you -- this is just the kind of reaction I'd hoped for. If you have time and feel like adding a review (http://wiki.mobileread.com/wiki/Category:Book_reviews), that would be better still.

I've added your book to the Apocalypse/Post-Apocalypse list Richard: http://www.feedbooks.com/list/64Thanks again for all your help, Hadrien.

jaxx6166
10-06-2008, 01:11 PM
Vampire Earth started out real well, I lost interest around book #4 though. Any reason to pick it back up?

Also - if no one else has suggested it you could try all of the novels of "The Change" by SM Stirling.

All are available as ebooks too =) Dies the Fire is a great intro. to the "oh snap now what" mentality. I'm currently plugging through "The Scourge of God" and its interesting to see the transition from "The Change" to "The Change" plus 20.

Another good series to try is "Mistborn" which is sort of PA in a fantasy world (what if evil wins) and the current "Genesis of Shannara" trilogy that Terry Brooks just completed. (Armageddon's Children / The Elves of Cinta / The Gypsy Morph )

izmi
10-08-2008, 05:24 AM
The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood is also a brilliant P-A novel. It is about a woman name Offred, one of the few fertile women in a now descimated and heavily fundamental christian America.

HappyMartin
10-08-2008, 06:05 AM
Actually CNN at the moment is starting to sound increasingly like a post apocalyptic novel in progress. ;)

Over
10-08-2008, 07:47 AM
Vampire Earth started out real well, I lost interest around book #4 though. Any reason to pick it back up?


I don't know, as I've only read the first 4 books! :D

But I have the other two pBooks already waiting to be read. And I will do so as soon as I finish reading Elantris, from the same author of Mistborn.

mores
10-08-2008, 02:29 PM
I just want to subscribe to this thread for research when I'm in need for new books to read.

izmi
10-10-2008, 11:14 AM
I keep thinking of good novels to reccommend in this genre, or in a genre extremely close to it. I must admit that I have something of an obsessesion with post-apocalyptic and dystopian literature.

Anyway, a good author to try is Greg Bear. Blood Music is a.m.a.z.i.n.g. It's all about a viral change to the entire planet, and although it's now 23 years old, it is still simply fantastic. I didn't even realise it was as old as I am until I checked the publication date. I also really enjoyed the Darwin series; Darwin's Radio and Darwin's Children. It is not so much P-A or dystopian, they are somewhat similar, and well worth the read.

If it's post-apocalyptic you're after, can I puff my own latest novel, Refuge?
I have read the first few chapters of this book, and am quite enjoying it.

astra
10-10-2008, 11:16 AM
On another forum I have found the following list (not only ebook):

Margaret Atwood - Oryx and Crake
David Brin - The Postman
Terry Brooks - Armegeddon's Children
Philip K. Dick - Dr. Bloodmoney
Philip K. Dick - The Penultimate Truth
Hal Duncan - The Book of All Hours Duology
General John Hackett - Third World War
James Herbert - Rats Trilogy
Stephen King - The Stand
Stephen King - The Dark Tower Series
Stephen King - The Cell
Richard Matheson - I am Legend
Robert McCammon - Swansong
Cormac McCarthy - The Road
Paul J McAuley - Fairyland
Walter M. Miller - A Canticle for Leibowitz
Larry Niven & Jerry Pournelle - Lucifers Hammer
Jeff Vandermeer - Veniss Underground
Alastair Reynolds - Chasm City
Jeff Somers - The Electric Church
George R. Stewart - Earth Abides
S. M. Stirling - Dies the Fire
S. M. Stirling - Island in the Sea of Time
S. M. Stirling - Snow Brother (the first of the Fifth Millinium series)
Patrick Tilley - Amtrack Wars Series
Roger Zelazny - Damnation Alley

Gibbo
10-10-2008, 12:16 PM
Anyway, a good author to try is Greg Bear. Blood Money is a.m.a.z.i.n.g. It's all about a viral change to the entire planet, and although it's now 23 years old, it is still simply fantastic. I didn't even realise it was as old as I am until I checked the publication date.

I think you meant Blood Music, right?

rwtreptow
10-10-2008, 02:47 PM
Check out the Change Series by S.M. Sterling

I just finished book 1: The Sunrise Lands

It's a good twist with demise of high-technology and reversion to middle ages tech

Sparrow
10-10-2008, 03:30 PM
It's a good twist with demise of high-technology and reversion to middle ages tech

John Cristopher wrote a couple of excellent (young adult) trilogies on the same theme - 'Tripods' and 'the Prince in Waiting'.

ZenEngineer
10-10-2008, 04:35 PM
Check out the Change Series by S.M. Sterling

I just finished book 1: The Sunrise Lands

It's a good twist with demise of high-technology and reversion to middle ages tech

Actually, Dies The Fire is the first book in that series. The Sunrise Lands is 4th book in the series and begins the tie-in to an even earlier series that started with Island In The Sea Of Time.

izmi
10-10-2008, 06:28 PM
I think you meant Blood Music, right?

Why yes, I did. That'll teach me for posting at absurd hours in the morning. Thanks.

dadioflex
10-13-2008, 11:55 AM
Edit.

jrod
10-14-2008, 06:07 PM
How about Alas, Babylon by Pat Frank.

desertgrandma
10-14-2008, 06:29 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_works_by_William_W._Johnstone
http://www.mobipocket.com/EN/eBooks/AuthorDetails.asp?authorId=9041&authorName=Johnstone%2C+William+W%2E

The Ashes series. If you're going to mention Ahern and Axler then, hey, why not? I managed to get almost halfway through the first Ashes book before giving up but if you like the Survivalist series it could be your cup of tea. I'm neutral on Deathlands. I read the first book in that series but never felt the urge to read any more. I didn't like the sudden appearance of laser rifles and plasma grenades in amongst the "conventional" hardware.

Years ago,in the late '90's, I used to work in a used book store. We could never keep the Johnstone books in stock....there was always a waiting list for his "Ashes" books......Just like when the Stephen King serial "The Green Mile" came out. Remember? One thin little book at a time? A perk of working there meant I had first crack....big deal, read the thing in one evening and it was back in the store the next day.......LOL

mazzeltjes
10-28-2008, 04:01 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_works_by_William_W._Johnstone
http://www.mobipocket.com/EN/eBooks/AuthorDetails.asp?authorId=9041&authorName=Johnstone%2C+William+W%2E

The Ashes series. If you're going to mention Ahern and Axler then, hey, why not? I managed to get almost halfway through the first Ashes book before giving up but if you like the Survivalist series it could be your cup of tea. I'm neutral on Deathlands. I read the first book in that series but never felt the urge to read any more. I didn't like the sudden appearance of laser rifles and plasma grenades in amongst the "conventional" hardware.

Like Ahern and Axler
More right-wing gun obsessed crap.
Puking books.

nekokami
10-29-2008, 12:10 PM
A Canticle for Liebowitz is now available as an ebook from Amazon. This is really classic post-apocalyptic stuff.

amy.patkins
10-08-2010, 09:57 AM
fantastic NEW post-apoc book I found on iBooks... "Eden" by Matthew Plourde

wow, what a surprise. I'm a big fan of post-apoc, but some of them miss the mark... Eden was right up my alley!

I see it's also on Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Eden-Matthew-C-Plourde/dp/1453847383/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1286542447&sr=8-1

GraceKrispy
10-08-2010, 06:40 PM
I recently read a few that I think fit into this category-- "The Summoning Fire (http://gracekrispy.blogspot.com/2010/10/review-summoning-fire-by-david-michael.html)" by David Michael (MR member) and "Flaming Dove (http://gracekrispy.blogspot.com/2010/09/review-flaming-dove-by-daniel-arenson.html)" by Daniel Arenson.

Of course, there is also the Hunger Games (http://gracekrispy.blogspot.com/2010/10/hunger-games-trilogy-by-suzanne-collins.html) trilogy, which would fit as well.

jeorence
01-17-2011, 03:42 PM
You could try Jerry Ahern's Survivalist series. But it's quite a pain to have a complete set.