View Full Version : Review: Amazon Reader Needs More Juice


pilotbob
11-21-2007, 03:22 PM
Kindle review from AP:

http://apnews.excite.com/article/20071121/D8T27I4G0.html

Alisa
11-21-2007, 04:17 PM
I wonder if he charged it fully before using it. How's it lasting for other folks here?

Zoot
11-21-2007, 06:27 PM
After 24 hours, mostly in "sleep" state, wireless always on (though whether it will do wireless stuff in sleep mode I still am not sure of), probably 2.5 hours of active use including a couple downloads, a few Wikipedia searches, the battery indicator has now finally moved down a notch (maybe 15-20% or it's "full" range?).

So something was definitely wrong if it needed a charge after 24 hours for that reviewer.

Z.

tompe
11-21-2007, 06:39 PM
The review did not say he put it in sleep state. The Cybook Gen3 for example will last 5 days when it is on all the time. So it would be interesting to know how long the Kindle will last.

Zoot
11-21-2007, 06:44 PM
The manual states that the Kindle goes into sleep mode on its own after being idle for 10 minutes.

Z.

tompe
11-21-2007, 07:36 PM
Aha, so how long does it take to start reading from sleep mode and can you disable the sleep mode?

Nate the great
11-21-2007, 09:00 PM
The manual states that the Kindle goes into sleep mode on its own after being idle for 10 minutes.

Z.

I've seen it. The manual is correct.


Aha, so how long does it take to start reading from sleep mode and can you disable the sleep mode?

Exiting sleep mode only takes as long as one screen flash. I think the Kindle is still running, just the keys are disabled.

CCDMan
11-21-2007, 09:09 PM
How hard is switching the battery? It looks to be about as hard as a cordless phone. Might be worth having two batteries? Of course, no external charger available....

Zoot
11-21-2007, 09:14 PM
You can't disable sleep mode that I know of (not sure why you'd want to). Takes about four seconds to come back from sleep versus 12-14 seconds or so from "power off" or ~30 seconds for a cold boot.

Z.

TallMomof2
11-21-2007, 09:15 PM
If you pop off the back cover the battery is right there and it looks like it simply plugs in.

huari
11-21-2007, 09:56 PM
Gee whiz, sounds like the reviewer didn't turn off WiFi nor does not want to be bother to safe battery life.....

"The modem can be turned off with an external switch, and Amazon said that should allow the device to run for a week between charges. I didn't have the time to test this claim, but in any case, I don't want to be bothered with remembering to turn the modem on when it's time to download the day's newspaper, then turning it off."

I think flicking the switch to turn off the Wifi will go a long way to increase battery life. :-)

Alisa
11-21-2007, 10:19 PM
Gee whiz, sounds like the reviewer didn't turn off WiFi nor does not want to be bother to safe battery life.....

"The modem can be turned off with an external switch, and Amazon said that should allow the device to run for a week between charges. I didn't have the time to test this claim, but in any case, I don't want to be bothered with remembering to turn the modem on when it's time to download the day's newspaper, then turning it off."

I think flicking the switch to turn off the Wifi will go a long way to increase battery life. :-)

I don't know if I'm imagining things. I'm not an expert on wireless technologies, but the CDMA phones I've had have always lost battery life REALLY fast when I had marginal signal. I've had this experience on GSM as well but it has seemed even worse on my CDMA devices. I've only had two of each, so that's not really a big sample, though.

tompe
11-22-2007, 10:06 AM
I don't know if I'm imagining things. I'm not an expert on wireless technologies, but the CDMA phones I've had have always lost battery life REALLY fast when I had marginal signal. I've had this experience on GSM as well but it has seemed even worse on my CDMA devices. I've only had two of each, so that's not really a big sample, though.

I tried to use my GSM phone as a clock in Japan were there is no network and I run out of battery very fast since it tried to locate a network all the time.

HarryT
11-22-2007, 10:18 AM
I tried to use my GSM phone as a clock in Japan were there is no network and I run out of battery very fast since it tried to locate a network all the time.

Most "smartphones" let you switch the phone circuitry off, so you can still use the other aspects of the device. Necessary if you have a SmartPhone/PDA and you want to use the PDA features on an aircraft, for example.

TallMomof2
11-22-2007, 09:10 PM
I charged mine up yesterday after I played around with the wireless and it's still at 100% charged after leaving it on and reading for about 2 hours. (It's Thanksgiving, didn't have much time to read :D)

BTW, the wireless has been off since I charged it up.

montsnmags
11-22-2007, 11:05 PM
Gee whiz, sounds like the reviewer didn't turn off WiFi nor does not want to be bother to safe battery life.....

"The modem can be turned off with an external switch, and Amazon said that should allow the device to run for a week between charges. I didn't have the time to test this claim, but in any case, I don't want to be bothered with remembering to turn the modem on when it's time to download the day's newspaper, then turning it off."

I think flicking the switch to turn off the Wifi will go a long way to increase battery life. :-)

In other news...

Review: Bidet needs to dry-up

By I. L .B. INTHAJON

Making a successful receptacle for human waste disposal is one of the toughest tasks in modern day plumbing. Many have tried and all have failed, defeated by something that's thousands of years old - the hole in the ground.

This week, TheGanges.com Inc. (TGNG) released the Bidet, the best attempt yet at flushing the hole in the ground. It's in some ways an amazing device, but it's severely submerged by its poor drying ability, making it hard to see it becoming number 1.

The brilliance of the Bidet is the inclusion of a small water spout in the bowl, which is the size of a hole in the ground but above the ground. Through this water spout, the Bidet can stream cleanliness after you have downloaded, - all for a water usage fee - anywhere a connection to water is available. You don't need a seperate water supply - the plumber takes care of that.

The Bidet can clean the results of up to 200 varieties of dinner party - a full-house gathering with home-delivered Vindaloo, or a meeting, with nibblies, of the local chapter of the "We Love Fibre In Our Diets" IBS Society - all washed away in moments, if you have good water pressure.

It can clean your boots too, but those may require some brushing.

Apart from cleanliness, the main benefit of the bidet is its smooth sides, which leave little residue post-flush. In fact, it barely requires any cleaning at all. Nile Pty Ltd, with their FlushAir, claims that weeks can pass by before it is required to get the brush out.

The bidet, by contrast with the FlushAir, did not leave my rear-end dry at all, and I was required to use a nearby towel. TheGanges said that a supply of towels or paper towelettes should be all that is required for a clean *and* dry bottom.

But still, that's not good, and I think something is backed-up. Combining a white porcelain finish, and stream of clean water, and a comfortable seat shouldn't result in a device that leaves one with a wet bottom.

I can dry my bottom with a towel or paper towelette, and TheGanges said that this is a relatively simple matter that will leave my bottom dry, but, in any case, I don't want to be bothered with remembering to wipe my bottom when it's time to leave for work. I know I'd forget to and leave an unsightly wet patch on my trousers when I'm running out the door.

This is all a big pity, because the Bidet does so much else right.

The rest of the Bidet interface is not convincing. TheGanges has strained to make it easy to relax upon its device, but it's hard to grab for the push-button when you are reclined so comfortably.

It's also poorly configured for the cleaning function, requiring you to sit upright for a proper clean.

But I'm willing to overlook some of this crappy design, because the Bidet has some really cool features. For instance, a padded seat ensures that your legs don't go to sleep when sitting for a long time after a bad risotto. A magazine rack sits beside it. There is room for a pine-scented aerosol can on top of the cistern. There's even a floor rug for absent-minded misses.

The real reason I can't recommend the Bidet is the drying issue. It's quite possible that TheGanges could apply some simple fix, like an attached towel-rack or a jet of warm air, because we expect when buying into a cleaner backside, that we would also be buying into compensation for our inability to wipe our own backsides.

If not, we'll have to wait or the next attempt at making a great replacement for a hole in the ground. Like a great, brown whale of the plumbing world, it seems elusive.



Cheers,
Marc

sfernald
11-22-2007, 11:56 PM
I charged up my kindle this morning. Just now I checked the battery and I see it's at about 30%.

I have several newspaper subscriptions (WSJ, NYT, IBD) that transfer each morning, and I have several blogs that update throughout the day. I probably used the reader maybe 3-4 hours today, including a little web surfing. I kept the wireless on the whole time.

It actually surprised me that it is this low right now. I don't recall it ever having fallen this low before. I think it dropped quite a bit while I was over at the in-laws for thanksgiving. I don't think you can get evdo in their house, so I suspect it dropped down to the slower, more battery intensive wireless connection.

But still this makes me think this thing needs to be charged on a daily basis. Kinda sucks. I was hoping to get 2-3 days between charges, but it doesn't look like I'm going to get that with the wireless on.

However, it is only on its 3rd charge or so. I think I'm supposed to run the battery through 5-10 times before I can fairly gauge what the battery life on this gadget will be.

In any case, I'm glad I will have my sony reader around as a backup because I know I go for weeks with that before a recharge is needed.

pilotbob
11-23-2007, 11:52 AM
[i]Review: Bidet needs to dry-up


What's a bidet? Never heard of it, or used one. This guy must be right!

BOb

DaleDe
11-23-2007, 03:41 PM
I've seen it. The manual is correct.
Exiting sleep mode only takes as long as one screen flash. I think the Kindle is still running, just the keys are disabled.

I am sure it is doing more than that but that is all that is visible. It is likely placing the CPU in sleep mode also or at least slowing it down. In addition there is likely all sorts of internal hardware that is being turned off to save battery power.

Dale

Zoot
11-23-2007, 10:37 PM
Putting the Kindle into sleep (either manually or just letting it time out after 10 minutes) appears to be as good as turning it off from a battery life point of view.

Z.

DaleDe
11-24-2007, 11:19 AM
Putting the Kindle into sleep (either manually or just letting it time out after 10 minutes) appears to be as good as turning it off from a battery life point of view.

Z.

Do you have any data to back up this claim?

Dale

Zoot
11-24-2007, 12:56 PM
Just 24 hours in sleep mode with no movement of the battery indicator from full. Hence "appears".

Z.

TallMomof2
11-24-2007, 12:58 PM
I've noticed that reading a book off the SD card seems to use more power. So I've started moving the current books I'm reading from the SD card to the Kindle. I'm using the SD card as a storage device.