View Full Version : eBook, ebook, or e-book?


Colin Dunstan
04-05-2004, 01:43 PM
Ok guys, what do you think is a correct way of writing of the short form of electronic book? Is there any real difference that matters between eBook, ebook, and e-book? And if not, which one of them should be preferred?

ignatz
04-06-2004, 08:02 AM
Well, first it was "e-mail", but it didn't take long to become "email". Similarly, I would guess that "e-book" and "eBook" will shortly devolve into the simplest form, "ebook". Outside of marketing literature, no one uses capitals in the middle of a word, and the "e-" thing is very late-90's... :wink:

cbarnett
04-06-2004, 07:11 PM
True, we lazy typists will all end up typing ebook as it requires the least work... :D

Craig.

Mobipocket
04-07-2004, 01:29 PM
Last year, Oxford has added the word "e-book" in the Oxford dictionaries.

ignatz
04-07-2004, 01:45 PM
Last year, Oxford has added the word "e-book" in the Oxford dictionaries.
****! We've been pre-empted! What do they list for "email/e-mail"?

radleyp
04-07-2004, 03:05 PM
Webster's Collegiate gives "e-book" and "e-mail". Interestingly if in lookup you type "email" or "ebook" you get those listings too. Philippe Radley

****! We've been pre-empted! What do they list for "email/e-mail"?

Mobipocket
04-08-2004, 11:17 AM
****! We've been pre-empted! What do they list for "email/e-mail"?
email : n. the system of sending messages by electronic means from one computer user to one or more recipients via a network.
v. mail or send using email
ORIGIN: abbrev. of electronic mail

Don't ask me why they choose "email" and "e-book" :blink:

scheps
09-30-2004, 08:21 AM
hoho i just made e-book equal lead :P

MrDoug
12-27-2012, 10:04 PM
The correct way is: iEBook. Just joking. But looks good. :)

pidgeon92
12-27-2012, 10:17 PM
http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR4oV4y77MxvBocb155YBizhUtfOYavF eiUK60Q9Dpc3EATV6H2Td2_hNbh8Q

ucfgrad93
12-28-2012, 12:00 AM
The correct way is: iEBook. Just joking. But looks good. :)

Holy thread resurrection, Batman.

Daniel Jones
12-28-2012, 01:50 AM
It's eBook but doesn't matter you call write it eBook or ebook. We pronounce it e and book. :D

Apache
12-28-2012, 06:24 AM
Holy thread resurrection, Batman.

that's spelled eresurrection.:D
Apache

jersysman
12-28-2012, 11:05 AM
Is that a record? A little over 8 years and 3 months!

VaultBoy
12-28-2012, 05:05 PM
http://cdn.chud.com/b/be/be6b068f_ThreadNecromancy.jpeg

haydnfan
12-29-2012, 09:47 AM
It's eBook

Not according to Merriam Webster or OED. And besides I don't read a Book, so why would I read an eBook?

The only time I've seen that misspelling is by Adobe. It reminds me of Red Lobster, whose logo shows a lobster with only four pairs of legs instead of five.

The accepted spelling is e-book, and just like what happened with email, the common usage of ebook will become the accepted spelling in a matter of years.

montana123
12-29-2012, 11:32 AM
Daniel Jones wins the award for the most incorrect answer ... and haydnfan takes home the prize for the most correct answer.

As haydnfan says, the correct spelling is "e-book." Of course, that begs the question: According to who?

Well, it depends on which professional style guide you follow. Most every professional publication has its writers follow one specific style guide, and for those writers, the correct answer to any spelling or style question is whatever the most recent edition of the style guide they use says it is.

In the United States, at least, The AP (Associated Press) Style Guide is far and above the most-used guide, followed by The Chicago Manual of Style. Further confusing the matter, though, is the fact that most publications also have their own in-house style guides that are generally used to compliment The AP Guide, The Chicago Manual, or whatever other professional guide they follow.

So, what's the purpose, then, of having an in-house style guide? Well, not every single question is answered in the pro guides, so sometimes a publisher or publication has to settle on its own rule, so that its writers can always stay consistent in their published articles. Also, many trade publications use a lot of words -- industry jargon, for instance -- that you simply can't find in the AP Guide or the Chicago Manual. Again, in order to keep everyone on the same page, a publication needs to decide on its own rules for those specific words.

That is NOT the case, however, with the word "e-book." Both the 2011 and 2012 editions of The AP Style Guide use the "e-book" spelling. But as haydnfan rightly points out, that spelling will almost certainly change to "ebook" withing the next year or two, just as "e-mail" was eventually changed to "email" when the latter spelling became so much more omnipresent, especially in highly-regarded journalistic publications.

One question: Lots of you are clearly under the impression that the correct spelling of the word is "eBook." Where are you getting that from? I'm genuinely curious: Can any of you remember why you first started spelling it that way, and/or why you still think it's spelled that way? Thanks in advance.

QuantumIguana
12-31-2012, 12:58 PM
I use e-book, but hyphens tend to be dropped over time. "ebook" just looks like it should be pronounced "ehbook", but that's the way things are trending. "eBook" doesn't make sense, that looks like a proper name like the iPad.

Joy736
01-03-2013, 03:42 AM
I choose ebook, because we also use email nowadays for example. That's my logic :D and I'm not the only one with that logic apparently.

crich70
01-03-2013, 03:54 AM
I think it will be ebook for the same reason as other hyphenated words lose them. Bed-Chamber = bedchamber and so forth. People write/type things out in the easiest way and over time that becomes the accepted manner.

WT Sharpe
01-03-2013, 09:12 AM
I've wavered, but from henceforth it shall be ebook.

...In the United States, at least, The AP (Associated Press) Style Guide is far and above the most-used guide.... Both the 2011 and 2012 editions of The AP Style Guide use the "e-book" spelling....

...and when the AP Style Guide finally come around to adopting my preferred spelling, they can send me a check for the royalties. ;)

JSWolf
01-03-2013, 09:15 AM
The correct word is...

eBook

New to eBooks.com? <--- ebooks.com
WHAT'S HOT IN eBOOKS <--- booksamillion.com/ebooks
eBooks: Romance, Mystery: eBook store: <--- www.booksonboard.com
eBook Readers - eBook Readers & Accessories <--- Amazon.com
Harlequin eBook Store <--- ebooks.eharlequin.com
Sample eBook Library <--- adobe.com
eBook Readers <-- ectaco.com
eBook Search - Free Books for iBooks and other eBook readers <--- itunes.apple.com
eBook Free eBooks:: Reader Store <--- ebookstore.sony.com
Top 50 eBooks <--- kobobooks.com
NOOK Book (eBook) <--- barnesandnoble.com

Need I go on? I think not.

HarryT
01-03-2013, 09:26 AM
Thanks for telling us, Jon. Now we know.

:).

ProfCrash
01-03-2013, 10:00 AM
Outside of the fact that the original thread is ancient (love the Magic Card by the way), who cares?

WT Sharpe
01-03-2013, 10:09 AM
Who cares? That's like saying it doesn't matter if you vote Republican, Democratic, or Independent. That's like saying it makes no difference if you dip or sprinkle. Who cares? You might as well say either pc OR Mac is fine.

Who cares? Sheesh! :D

DiapDealer
01-03-2013, 10:15 AM
I prefer e'Bo'ok.
... or was that a fantasy novel character? :chinscratch:

Apache
01-03-2013, 11:11 AM
How about book?
Apache

DrNefario
01-03-2013, 05:04 PM
The correct word is...

eBook



Putting a capital letter in the middle of a word is never correct, as far as I'm concerned, although I'll grudgingly give in in a few cases of trademarks or other proper nouns. What are they going to do if they want to start a sentence with it?

QuantumIguana
01-03-2013, 05:09 PM
We only need the terms "e-book" or "paper book" when we need to specify the format. As e-books take up more and more of the market, there will be less need to make a distinction, and we may wind up using the term "e-book" less and less. Some places use "eBook", but that is a very peculiar usage - capitalization is for proper nouns - and is unlikely to become the standard.

JSWolf
01-03-2013, 07:50 PM
We only need the terms "e-book" or "paper book" when we need to specify the format. As e-books take up more and more of the market, there will be less need to make a distinction, and we may wind up using the term "e-book" less and less. Some places use "eBook", but that is a very peculiar usage - capitalization is for proper nouns - and is unlikely to become the standard.

It's eBook or pBook. Those are the terms to correctly use with the correct capitalization.

JSWolf
01-03-2013, 07:51 PM
Putting a capital letter in the middle of a word is never correct, as far as I'm concerned, although I'll grudgingly give in in a few cases of trademarks or other proper nouns. What are they going to do if they want to start a sentence with it?

You still use eBook (with the lowercase e) if you are to start a sentence using it.

jgaiser
01-03-2013, 08:11 PM
It's eBook or pBook. Those are the terms to correctly use with the correct capitalization.

I'm curious. Who made you the final arbiter? Because, I seemed to have missed that voting process.

medard
01-03-2013, 08:12 PM
Since german publishing houses try to charge 90% of the price of the printed book for the manuscript, I prefer to call it manuscript and not ebook anymore.

You can't print it, you can't save your annontations, you don't own it, it gets destroyed and worthless after you're dead, you can't give it to your friends - so it's not a book.

Actually it's quite the opposite of a book.

UnderControl
01-04-2013, 12:46 AM
Last year, Oxford has added the word "e-book" in the Oxford dictionaries.

bastards! should of been ebook.

caleb72
01-04-2013, 01:31 AM
http://cdn.chud.com/b/be/be6b068f_ThreadNecromancy.jpeg

:rofl:

That's funny. The multitudinous MTG decks and singles sitting in my cupboard unused - not so much.

pdurrant
01-04-2013, 05:16 AM
The correct word is...

eBook

New to eBooks.com? <--- ebooks.com
WHAT'S HOT IN eBOOKS <--- booksamillion.com/ebooks
eBooks: Romance, Mystery: eBook store: <--- www.booksonboard.com
eBook Readers - eBook Readers & Accessories <--- Amazon.com
Harlequin eBook Store <--- ebooks.eharlequin.com
Sample eBook Library <--- adobe.com
eBook Readers <-- ectaco.com
eBook Search - Free Books for iBooks and other eBook readers <--- itunes.apple.com
eBook Free eBooks:: Reader Store <--- ebookstore.sony.com
Top 50 eBooks <--- kobobooks.com
NOOK Book (eBook) <--- barnesandnoble.com

Need I go on? I think not.

All those are examples where the word would be capitalised (note all the other capitalised words), or is a proper name (eBooks.com).

Where the word is not capitalised, I would always now use ebook. (My preferred choice of e.book never did catch on, although it's clearly the 'correct' form, as the e is an abbreviation for electronic.)

kennyc
01-04-2013, 07:14 AM
Who cares? That's like saying it doesn't matter if you vote Republican, Democratic, or Independent. That's like saying it makes no difference if you dip or sprinkle. Who cares? You might as well say either pc OR Mac is fine.

Who cares? Sheesh! :D


I vote for this, kill em all, let the gawds sort em out.

(and by 'em' I mean electrical m. :p)

medard
01-04-2013, 05:33 PM
We care because we are young gentlemen that care about each other and the way language affects our way of thinking..

JSWolf
01-04-2013, 11:08 PM
Last year, Oxford has added the word "e-book" in the Oxford dictionaries.

And last year, Oxford got it wrong. eBook does not have a dash in it.

Most of the people who actually deal with selling/making eBooks use the word eBook, not e-book. So every Oxford dictionary sold since e-book was added has a mistake in it.

JSWolf
01-04-2013, 11:12 PM
I prefer e'Bo'ok.
... or was that a fantasy novel character? :chinscratch:

That's Klingon for eBook. http://www.trekbbs.com/images/smilies/klingon.gif

JSWolf
01-04-2013, 11:14 PM
Language changes and now allows eBook and pBook.

BadBilly
01-04-2013, 11:17 PM
The correct form is, of course, "e-book". As people are lazy, it will soon enough become ebook.

eBook seems to be a bastardization that has evolved because people see that "ebook" just doesn't look right. It's "ehbook" for crying out loud. :)

JSWolf
01-04-2013, 11:18 PM
The correct form is, of course, "e-book". As people are lazy, it will soon enough become ebook.

eBook seems to be a bastardization that has evolved because people see that "ebook" just doesn't look right. It's "ehbook" for crying out loud. :)

ehBook is the Canadian misspelling of eBook. :rolleyes:

The correct form has no dash. I gave plenty of example of eBook being used in a professional capacity.

BadBilly
01-04-2013, 11:22 PM
ehBook is the Canadian misspelling of eBook. :rolleyes:

The correct form has no dash. I gave plenty of example of eBook being used in a professional capacity.

I can find hundreds of examples of people using "irregardles." I'm still going to say they're wrong.

Furthermore, having worked around marketing types a fair bit, I wouldn't let them be the final arbiters. They have, at best, a loose grasp on language, reality, and the truth. They love exclamation marks and arbitrary capitalization, though. :)

JSWolf
01-04-2013, 11:25 PM
I can find hundreds of examples of people using "irregardles." I'm still going to say they're wrong.

Furthermore, having worked around marketing types a fair bit, I wouldn't let them be the final arbiters. They have, at best, a loose grasp on language, reality, and the truth. They love exclamation marks and arbitrary capitalization, though. :)

But in this case, the marketing types know better.

HYPE
01-04-2013, 11:42 PM
Not a fan of the term "eBook" because it looks odd, just like "eMail". I think the "first letter lowercase + second letter uppercase" combination looks great for iPhone, iTunes and so forth because the letter i is much thinner than the letter e.

I vote for ebook.

WT Sharpe
01-05-2013, 02:46 AM
How about book?
Apache

Increasingly, that's what I've been calling my Kindle.

crich70
01-05-2013, 03:20 AM
That's Klingon for eBook. http://www.trekbbs.com/images/smilies/klingon.gif
Ah those sneaky klingon's, they do get around. Of course they also claim Shakespeare is best in 'the original klingon' as well. So what's the equivalent word in Vulcan?:rofl:

Asawi
01-05-2013, 04:00 AM
It's eBook or pBook. Those are the terms to correctly use with the correct capitalization.

I use eBook myself most of the time, because I thought that was correct. I also use eInk and eReader for the same reason. And also the "e" is there to indicate something electronic, and it comes across as such even to people not really "into" these things. Like people (yes the DO exist!) outside MR.
pBook I'm not sure I have ever seen before! Here in MR I se pbook a lot though.

Edit: And as for the poll - The blue one next to the fish ;)

DrNefario
01-05-2013, 05:10 AM
Well, eInk is a trade name, I believe, and is possibly where the foolish construction eBook comes from. I am confident that the mid-stream capital will not survive the forces of everyday usage. Heck, the main reason I give iPad a capital letter is because I am writing this on an iPad and it does it itself. It's not like anyone doesn't understand me if I drop it.

I do feel that eBook was never a correct usage in the UK. Certainly I don't think I've ever seen it like that in print. I'd say it used to be e-book and now it's ebook, just like with email.

Asawi
01-05-2013, 05:25 AM
I didn't realize how old this topic was! Interesting!
Article on the subject:
http://www.dailywritingtips.com/ebook-ebook-ebook-or-e-book/

pdurrant
01-05-2013, 05:46 AM
Edit: And as for the poll - The blue one next to the fish ;)

Your wish is my command.

Asawi
01-05-2013, 05:56 AM
Your wish is my command.

:rofl: and :thumbsup:

JSWolf
01-05-2013, 09:29 AM
I also use eReader And as for the poll - The blue one next to the fish ;)

Well said about the poll. Any poll on MR that leaves out the blue one next to the fish option is invalid.

As for eReader, that is already taken by eReader format and the program to display eReader format. So if you use it to mean something else, you've got it all wrong and the meaning of what you are trying to say s just going to be silly or not what you meant to say.

I prefer eBook as it just looks better then e-book (looks awful) and ebook (ooks like a typo). Besides if we cannot have eBook, pBook, eMail, eInk, etc, then iTunes, iPad, iPod, iPhone will have to become i-tunes, i-pad, i-pod, i-phone.

pdurrant
01-05-2013, 09:53 AM
I prefer eBook as it just looks better then e-book (looks awful) and ebook (ooks like a typo). Besides if we cannot have eBook, pBook, eMail, eInk, etc, then iTunes, iPad, iPod, iPhone will have to become i-tunes, i-pad, i-pod, i-phone.

But iTunes, iPad, iPod, iPhone (and iMac, which started all the iBusiness) are trademarks.

Ebook, that is, ebook, is or soon will be the preferred spelling, and not too long after, just book.

JSWolf
01-05-2013, 09:57 AM
But iTunes, iPad, iPod, iPhone (and iMac, which started all the iBusiness) are trademarks.

Ebook, that is, ebook, is or soon will be the preferred spelling, and not too long after, just book.

I've already proved that eBook is the preferred spelling. Why is it that nobody who is reading this thread can grasp that? :smack:

pdurrant
01-05-2013, 10:03 AM
I've already proved that eBook is the preferred spelling. Why is it that nobody who is reading this thread can grasp that? :smack:

Proper spelling in English is a consensus. I think that eBook is on the way out, and ebook on the way in. At the moment, I see it around 50:50.

QuantumIguana
01-05-2013, 10:08 AM
Language changes and now allows eBook and pBook.

Yes, language changes. But it doesn't allow eBook or pBook, despite what how some market-droids use it. The way language changes is to drop hyphens, "to-day" became "today", thus e-mail becomes email and e-book becomes ebook.

The language never allows capitals in anything but a proper noun or in acronyms, it is inevitable that any attempts by market-droids to use eBook will fail, and ebook will become the standard. There's simply no reason for the capital B, and without that reason, it is certain to fade out. It's doubly certain with capitalizing the second letter of a word, this only works as the proper name of a specific product. iPod would quickly become ipod if it was a generic term instead of a specific product.

HarryT
01-05-2013, 10:12 AM
Yes, language changes. But it doesn't allow eBook or pBook, despite what how some market-droids use it. The way language changes is to drop hyphens, "to-day" became "today", thus e-mail becomes email and e-book becomes ebook.


There's actually another stage:

1. Have two separate words.
2. Join them together with a hyphen.
3. Drop the hyphen.

If you read novels from the early 19th century onwards, you'll see "to day" becoming "to-day", and then "today". Same with lots of other words.

kennyc
01-05-2013, 10:20 AM
I can find hundreds of examples of people using "irregardles." I'm still going to say they're wrong.

...

That's better than irregirdles

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

kennyc
01-05-2013, 10:21 AM
There's actually another stage:

1. Have two separate words.
2. Join them together with a hyphen.
3. Drop the hyphen.

If you read novels from the early 19th century onwards, you'll see "to day" becoming "to-day", and then "today". Same with lots of other words.

Which is the most typical/traditional movement of words from what I've seen. And I been keepin' a close eye on them for the last 6 decades or so....they're sneaky, ya gotta watch 'em all the time.

BadBilly
01-05-2013, 03:20 PM
That's better than irregirdles

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

:smack:

Well, it can't be a misspelling, since it's not a word. :smash:

pdurrant
01-05-2013, 03:21 PM
I see that the blue one next to the fish is gaining ground. I hope we'll all soon be talking about how many blues we've read this year.

JSWolf
01-05-2013, 11:04 PM
The reason eBook works vs. ebook and e-book is because the e gets lost it ebook and e-book where in eBook, the e is not lost and is also easier to read and get the meaning right away.

pdurrant
01-06-2013, 07:52 AM
The reason eBook works vs. ebook and e-book is because the e gets lost it ebook and e-book where in eBook, the e is not lost and is also easier to read and get the meaning right away.

But in email the e doesn't get lost, and e and m are the same height, unlike e and b.

I think you're on the losing side of history with this one.

DrNefario
01-06-2013, 09:19 AM
I seem to remember that when this thread was revived, the three main options were about level, and now ebook has gone into a big lead. It's already happening.

kennyc
01-06-2013, 09:22 AM
Who cares, some people will argue about angels on pinheads...and there are lots of pinheads....

crich70
01-06-2013, 09:53 AM
Who cares, some people will argue about angels on pinheads...and there are lots of pinheads....
:eek::rofl:
Good one kennyc.

Apache
01-06-2013, 10:29 AM
Who cares, some people will argue about angels on pinheads...and there are lots of pinheads....

:rofl: +1
Apache

pholy
01-07-2013, 10:06 PM
Wow, it's a day and a half since the last comment. Can we let it go now for another eight years?


Please?

taosaur
01-07-2013, 11:20 PM
Wow, it's a day and a half since the last comment. Can we let it go now for another eight years?


Please?

But I have these two cents which absolutely must be dropped ;)

There is no correct spelling because obviously the issue is still evolving and it's not a settled question. Usage does seem to be dividing along discernible lines, though. The hyphenated "e-book" has become the formal spelling for use in journalistic and technical writing, while "ebook" dominates casual usage. Commercial usage trends toward imitating the eInk and iWhatnot trademarks with "eBook." We're very likely stuck with all three for quite some time.

Of course, as the novelty wears off we'll more often drop the "e" entirely in favor of "book," using "electronic" or "digital" when it's necessary to specify format.

bastards! should of been ebook.

You're mangling the idiom "Should've," as in a contraction of "Should have," which makes sense where a randomly inserted preposition does not. That's why Oxford doesn't contact you on these matters ;)

kennyc
01-08-2013, 06:18 AM
No if we can only settle on the correct spelling of John.

Apache
01-08-2013, 07:53 AM
No if we can only settle on the correct spelling of John.

Toilet? :D
Apache

WT Sharpe
01-08-2013, 09:41 AM
Wow, it's a day and a half since the last comment. Can we let it go now for another eight years?


Please?

Interestingly, this resurrected thread has already grown over 9 times as large as it was when it died in 2004. :eek:

Let it go for another 8 years? I'm game! ;)

JSWolf
01-08-2013, 09:47 AM
Wow, it's a day and a half since the last comment. Can we let it go now for another eight years?


Please?

Since you brought it up instead of letting it go, no, we cannot let it go. We were going to let it go, but you didn't let us let it go. Now we are not going to let it go. Thank you for not letting us let it go.

Oh and eBook.

JSWolf
01-08-2013, 09:47 AM
No if we can only settle on the correct spelling of John.

John = toilet

Jon = person's name

WT Sharpe
01-08-2013, 10:20 AM
I read ebooks on my liseuse. :D

din155
01-08-2013, 10:51 AM
The world might end before we settle this.

JSWolf
01-08-2013, 11:13 AM
I read ebooks on my liseuse. :D

In plain English, you don't read eBooks. You stare into a bright light thinking about eBooks.

kennyc
01-08-2013, 11:25 AM
I read ebooks on my liseuse. :D

You sir, are an EVIL man! :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

tubemonkey
01-08-2013, 11:36 AM
Since we're a group of book lovers, it's not eBook, ebook, or e-book; the correct term is:

Iz-8CSa9xj8

QuantumIguana
01-08-2013, 11:57 AM
But I have these two cents which absolutely must be dropped ;)

There is no correct spelling because obviously the issue is still evolving and it's not a settled question. Usage does seem to be dividing along discernible lines, though. The hyphenated "e-book" has become the formal spelling for use in journalistic and technical writing, while "ebook" dominates casual usage. Commercial usage trends toward imitating the eInk and iWhatnot trademarks with "eBook." We're very likely stuck with all three for quite some time.

Of course, as the novelty wears off we'll more often drop the "e" entirely in favor of "book," using "electronic" or "digital" when it's necessary to specify format.


I prefer e-book, but it doesn't matter what I prefer. I think ebook will likely become standard, with eBook being virtually certain to be dropped. The English language just doesn't use capitals for non-proper nouns, and it isn't likely to make an exception for e-books. The capitals in acronyms tend to be dropped when the acronym is word-like. SCUBA becomes scuba, RADAR became radar, while DVD is unlikely to become dvd, as DVD isn't like a word. Aspirin, once a trademarked product became aspirin, a generic word. The Xerox Corporation and the Kimberly-Clark Corporation fight against the trend toward eliminating capitals, fighting to make sure Xerox doesn't become xerox and Kleenex doesn't become kleenex. If someone wishes to use eBook, I'm not going to fight them on it, I don't care if people spell it that way. It would simply be completely counter to how the English language behaves and changes for the B in eBook to remain capitalized.

As for the spelling of John, when it's a proper noun, spell it however you like. But when talking about a toilet, it's "john". Calling a toilet "John" would seem to imply thinking the toilet was a person.

kennyc
01-08-2013, 12:04 PM
,....
As for the spelling of John, when it's a proper noun, spell it however you like. But when talking about a toilet, it's "john". Calling a toilet "John" would seem to imply thinking the toilet was a person.

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

WT Sharpe
01-08-2013, 12:22 PM
You sir, are an EVIL man! :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

:D Yes. Yes I am.

You have to go back pretty far in MR history to remember the ereader/liseuse wars!

kennyc
01-08-2013, 12:27 PM
Now THAT I do remember....it's the 60's and 70's I'm having trouble with...

WT Sharpe
01-08-2013, 12:44 PM
:D :D :D

JSWolf
01-08-2013, 12:59 PM
I prefer e-book, but it doesn't matter what I prefer. I think ebook will likely become standard, with eBook being virtually certain to be dropped. The English language just doesn't use capitals for non-proper nouns, and it isn't likely to make an exception for e-books. The capitals in acronyms tend to be dropped when the acronym is word-like. SCUBA becomes scuba, RADAR became radar, while DVD is unlikely to become dvd, as DVD isn't like a word. Aspirin, once a trademarked product became aspirin, a generic word. The Xerox Corporation and the Kimberly-Clark Corporation fight against the trend toward eliminating capitals, fighting to make sure Xerox doesn't become xerox and Kleenex doesn't become kleenex. If someone wishes to use eBook, I'm not going to fight them on it, I don't care if people spell it that way. It would simply be completely counter to how the English language behaves and changes for the B in eBook to remain capitalized.

As for the spelling of John, when it's a proper noun, spell it however you like. But when talking about a toilet, it's "john". Calling a toilet "John" would seem to imply thinking the toilet was a person.

John or john = toilet
Jon = person
jon = misspelling of Jon

Now as for the English language, it changes and evolves. So who's to say that eBook won't be the word? Heck, lol is now in the dictionary.

QuantumIguana
01-08-2013, 02:02 PM
John or john = toilet
Jon = person
jon = misspelling of Jon

Now as for the English language, it changes and evolves. So who's to say that eBook won't be the word? Heck, lol is now in the dictionary.

A toilet may be called "john", but never "John". You can call it an "eBook" if you wish, but there's very little change that becomes standard. Capitals get dropped from everything but proper nouns. Aspirin becomes aspirin. It takes teams of lawyers sending letters to keep Xerox and Kleenex from becoming xerox and kleenex. If iPad ever became a generic term for a tablet, given how the English language changes, it would probably change to ipad.

And John and Jon have different derivations.

JSWolf
01-08-2013, 04:48 PM
And John and Jon have different derivations.

And whoever added the h to Jon just was wrong. It's Jon. There is, never has been and never will be a need for the h.

WT Sharpe
01-08-2013, 04:57 PM
Sharpe, however, requires an "e" at the end to differentiate it from an adjective.

QuantumIguana
01-08-2013, 05:12 PM
And whoever added the h to Jon just was wrong. It's Jon. There is, never has been and never will be a need for the h.

The h was never added. Jon is short for Jonathan, which means "God has given". It's distinct from John, which means "God is gracious".

kennyc
01-08-2013, 05:15 PM
and there is no extra e in Kenny despite what mama put on the birth certificate...

kennyc
01-08-2013, 05:17 PM
The h was never added. Jon is short for Jonathan, which means "God has given". It's distinct from John, which means "God is gracious".

The "H" you say!

JSWolf
01-08-2013, 05:19 PM
The h was never added. Jon is short for Jonathan, which means "God has given". It's distinct from John, which means "God is gracious".

And Jon came before John. The problem is too many people assume that Jon is John and add the h and make it all wrong. So let's do away with the h makine it just Jon and no more annoying mistakes.

Bilbo1967
01-08-2013, 05:21 PM
And Jon came before John. The problem is too many people assume that Jon is John and add the h and make it all wrong. So let's do away with the h makine it just Jon and no more annoying mistakes.

Unless you were christened John, in which case that's what you want to be called :rolleyes:

QuantumIguana
01-08-2013, 05:30 PM
John predates Jon by many centuries. Jon used to be a nickname for Jonathan, and only recently became a given name in its own right. If you include the names from which John is derived, the "h" goes back many more centuries. John and Jon look similar, but they aren't the same name at all.

taosaur
01-08-2013, 11:31 PM
Also, "Jonathan" is properly pronounced "Jo-nathan," as in "Jo-nathan, shovel out the john and fetch me some more terbaccer!"

Piper_
01-08-2013, 11:38 PM
and there is no extra e in Kenny despite what mama put on the birth certificate...

That's almost as odd as that "c" she added at the end, there.
;)

WT Sharpe
01-08-2013, 11:51 PM
...it depends on which professional style guide you follow. Most every professional publication has its writers follow one specific style guide, and for those writers, the correct answer to any spelling or style question is whatever the most recent edition of the style guide they use says it is.

In the United States, at least, The AP (Associated Press) Style Guide is far and above the most-used guide, followed by The Chicago Manual of Style. Further confusing the matter, though, is the fact that most publications also have their own in-house style guides that are generally used to compliment The AP Guide, The Chicago Manual, or whatever other professional guide they follow....

This is somewhat off-topic, but in late-breaking news, violence continues between two rival gangs divided by their loyalties to the The Associated Press Stylebook and The Chicago Manual Of Style. See 4 Copy Editors Killed In Ongoing AP Style, Chicago Manual Gang Violence (http://www.theonion.com/articles/4-copy-editors-killed-in-ongoing-ap-style-chicago,30806/) for details. :p

taosaur
01-09-2013, 05:35 AM
I prefer e-book, but it doesn't matter what I prefer. I think ebook will likely become standard, with eBook being virtually certain to be dropped.

The assumption that a single standard will emerge may be flawed. Electronic formats for novels are knee deep in the mainstream now, and opinions on nomenclature remain divided. While I would say "ebook" is already acceptable, I don't see it replacing "e-book" on sites aspiring to journalism and even "eBook" will likely persist on sites mainly interested in variegating their typeface.

There's no necessity driving sites to adopt a single standard, and as e-books as a category become less controversial, there's less necessity to refer to format at all except when expressly distinguishing from physical media.

kennyc
01-09-2013, 06:43 AM
That's almost as odd as that "c" she added at the end, there.
;)

There is actually a story behind that, but I won't bore you. :D

kennyc
01-09-2013, 06:44 AM
This is somewhat off-topic, but in late-breaking news, violence continues between two rival gangs divided by their loyalties to the The Associated Press Stylebook and The Chicago Manual Of Style. See 4 Copy Editors Killed In Ongoing AP Style, Chicago Manual Gang Violence (http://www.theonion.com/articles/4-copy-editors-killed-in-ongoing-ap-style-chicago,30806/) for details. :p

Sort of a typo-tussle, a font-fight, a grammar-grapple eh?

John F
01-09-2013, 07:50 AM
John is so much more interesting then Jon...

The john (who's name was John), paid the prostitute while sitting on the john.

(I'm not sure about proper capitalization.)

:)

JSWolf
01-09-2013, 09:15 AM
Also, "Jonathan" is properly pronounced "Jo-nathan," as in "Jo-nathan, shovel out the john and fetch me some more terbaccer!"

You have that all wrong. Jonathan is pronounced [jon-uh-thuh n]

JSWolf
01-09-2013, 09:21 AM
e-books

e-books is not a word. A word with a hyphen has two separate words joined together by the hyphen to make one word. e is not a word on its own so it doesn't work. Take hard-won (for example), you have both hard & won that make up hard-won. Both are separate words. e is not a word so e-books is not valid.

If anything, the word that finally wins the battle is going to either be eBooks or ebooks. But e-books being invalid cannot be the word.

JSWolf
01-09-2013, 09:27 AM
John is so much more interesting then Jon...

The john (who's name was John), paid the prostitute while sitting on the john.

(I'm not sure about proper capitalization.)

:)

Let's do this the right way...

The john (who's name was Jon), paid the prostitute while sitting on the john.

kennyc
01-09-2013, 09:28 AM
John John John John John

GeoffC
01-09-2013, 09:52 AM
Amazon says "ebooks", so that'll be what they'll be called !

tubemonkey
01-09-2013, 10:12 AM
The john (who's name was John), paid the prostitute while sitting on the john.

The john (who's name was Jon), paid the prostitute while sitting on the john.

"By George", said Paul while sitting on the John, "where did my Ringo?" :D

kennyc
01-09-2013, 10:19 AM
"By George", said Paul while sitting on the John, "where did my Ringo?" :D

:snicker: :snicker: :snicker:

Rick1971
01-09-2013, 10:25 AM
most of the under 30 crowd like to shortening words to the smallest possible factor, so ebook is what the children use, but e-book is the way it started (I think)

tubemonkey
01-09-2013, 10:34 AM
most of the under 30 crowd like to shortening words to the smallest possible factor, so ebook is what the children use, but e-book is the way it started (I think)

I love brevity :D

JSWolf
01-09-2013, 10:54 AM
Amazon says "ebooks", so that'll be what they'll be called !

Thank you very much for that. Since we are now going by what Amazon uses, then it's eBooks.

Kindle eBooks

http://www.amazon.com/Kindle-eBooks/b?ie=UTF8&node=1286228011

kennyc
01-09-2013, 11:15 AM
I love brevity :D

http://brevitymag.com/

:D

Tarana
01-09-2013, 12:07 PM
I pick ebook. Most people aren't very good typists :chinscratch:and random capitalization can simply confuse the issue. :bookworm:

JSWolf
01-09-2013, 07:19 PM
I pick ebook. Most people aren't very good typists :chinscratch:and random capitalization can simply confuse the issue. :bookworm:

But it's not random. It's very specific. eBooks is not Ebooks or ebOoks or eboOks or ebooKs or ebookS, etc.

jgaiser
01-09-2013, 08:24 PM
But it's not random. It's very specific. eBooks is not Ebooks or ebOoks or eboOks or ebooKs or ebookS, etc.

Sigh.... :deadhorse:

taosaur
01-10-2013, 12:23 AM
Sigh.... :deadhorse:

Stop abusing that eH0rs3

GeoffC
01-10-2013, 09:34 AM
Thank you very much for that. Since we are now going by what Amazon uses, then it's eBooks.

Kindle eBooks

http://www.amazon.com/Kindle-eBooks/b?ie=UTF8&node=1286228011

ebooks in the drop-down menu, eBook in the documentation....And yet we have e-readers :chinscratch:

Oh sod it - let's just call 'em books ...... :thumbsup:

kennyc
01-10-2013, 09:35 AM
Meh, let's all have some chocolate and read.

GeoffC
01-10-2013, 09:37 AM
Meh, let's all have some chocolate and read.


Read !


What time do we have to read the books (e-books, eBooks, books) when we're actively debating one of life's mysteries....

p.s. why's it always a book we read, and not a story (or should that be eStory)

kennyc
01-10-2013, 09:47 AM
Well then ... I'm going to have some eChocolate and do some eReading of eStories on my ebook.

GeoffC
01-10-2013, 09:47 AM
or should that be e-reader !?

kennyc
01-10-2013, 09:49 AM
That's it, I'm going to the John.

GeoffC
01-10-2013, 09:50 AM
titters

JSWolf
01-10-2013, 09:53 AM
ebooks in the drop-down menu, eBook in the documentation....And yet we have e-readers :chinscratch:

Oh sod it - let's just call 'em books ...... :thumbsup:

e-readers is incorrect as well for the same reason that e-books is incorrect.

QuantumIguana
01-10-2013, 10:59 AM
Read !


What time do we have to read the books (e-books, eBooks, books) when we're actively debating one of life's mysteries....

p.s. why's it always a book we read, and not a story (or should that be eStory)

A book might contain a story, but it might not. It might be a cookbook or a non-fiction book. "Book" is the more general term, we might use a more specific if appropriate. We might say "I read a really good book", or if we want to be more specific, we might say "I read a really good short story" or "I read a really good novel."

That's it, I'm going to the John.

Say hi to John for me! It "the John" sort of like calling Donald Trump "the Donald"?

WT Sharpe
01-10-2013, 11:13 AM
...Say hi to John for me! It "the John" sort of like calling Donald Trump "the Donald"?

I usually think of Donald Trump as the john.

crich70
01-10-2013, 11:22 AM
Wikipedia has it as e-book or ebook. :D
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-book

Apache
01-10-2013, 03:47 PM
That's it, I'm going to the John.

Should that not be the ejohn? :chinscratch: :D
Apache

kennyc
01-10-2013, 03:51 PM
eJohn, iPotty, who knows, ask iJon

JSWolf
01-10-2013, 04:18 PM
Wikipedia has it as e-book or ebook. :D
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-book

Wiki is wrong. e-book is grammatically incorrect. e is not a word, so e-reader is incorrect. The dash has to have two separate words on each side. So e-mail, e-book, e-reader, e-anything is just incorrect.

John F
01-10-2013, 04:22 PM
Wiki is wrong. e-book is grammatically incorrect. e is not a word, so e-reader is incorrect. The dash has to have two separate words on each side. So e-mail, e-book, e-reader, e-anything is just incorrect.
Isn't eBook incorrect? You do not capitalize in the middle of a word, except for proper nouns. :chinscratch:

JSWolf
01-10-2013, 04:24 PM
Isn't eBook incorrect? You do not capitalize in the middle of a word, except for proper nouns. :chinscratch:

Probably, but at least it looks good.

JSWolf
01-10-2013, 04:31 PM
Regardless is the word is eBook, ebook, or e-book, according to the Oxford Dictionary, whenever you say that word using the pronunciation below, you are speaking US English.

Pronunciation: /ˈēˌbo͝ok/

The pronunciation for British and World English is not the same.

Pronunciation: /ˈiːbʊk/

Apache
01-10-2013, 05:42 PM
ewhocares.
Apache

pilotbob
01-10-2013, 07:27 PM
The correct word is...

Need I go on? I think not.

No, but that won't stop you!

BOb

kennyc
01-10-2013, 07:41 PM
No, but that won't stop you!

BOb

We can hope.

jgaiser
01-10-2013, 07:51 PM
ewhocares.
Apache

Jon apparently does. Why exactly, I don't know.

ucfgrad93
01-10-2013, 08:54 PM
Jon apparently does. Why exactly, I don't know.

That is eJon to you! Show some respect dammit!:p

jgaiser
01-10-2013, 09:02 PM
That is eJon to you! Show some respect dammit!:p

Oh, trust me. That was respectful.

pilotbob
01-10-2013, 09:54 PM
That is eJon to you! Show some respect dammit!:p

I'm pretty sure it's E-Jon.

BOb

crich70
01-10-2013, 09:57 PM
Does anyone else think that e-jon looks a bit flushed? :D Sorry I just couldn't resist.

QuantumIguana
01-10-2013, 10:25 PM
What does Superman use after getting out of the shower?

Tow-El.

ucfgrad93
01-10-2013, 10:38 PM
I'm pretty sure it's E-Jon.

BOb

On second thought, I really think that it is E-John.:chinscratch:

tubemonkey
01-10-2013, 10:53 PM
e-readers is incorrect as well for the same reason that e-books is incorrect.

eRror... that should be iNcorrect :D

taosaur
01-10-2013, 11:04 PM
Wiki is wrong. e-book is grammatically incorrect. e is not a word, so e-reader is incorrect. The dash has to have two separate words on each side. So e-mail, e-book, e-reader, e-anything is just incorrect.

So the correct answer is e'book. Tell the world, Jon :D

pdurrant
01-11-2013, 03:02 AM
So the correct answer is e'book. Tell the world, Jon :D

No, as I've mentioned before, since e is an abbreviation, it should be e.book. ;)

JSWolf
01-11-2013, 03:05 AM
No, as I've mentioned before, since e is an abbreviation, it should be e.book. ;)

e.book = extraterrestrial book

Of course, we know that eBooks aren't normal so maybe they are made by aliens (from another planet).

But to be serious for a moment, a lot of eBooks are made by people with no work ethic (no pride in their work). They do the minimum needed to produce an eBook and it's a crap shoot if it's going to turn out OK. Even if the text is OK, the formatting usually isn't.

DrNefario
01-11-2013, 08:14 AM
Wiki is wrong. e-book is grammatically incorrect. e is not a word, so e-reader is incorrect. The dash has to have two separate words on each side. So e-mail, e-book, e-reader, e-anything is just incorrect.

That's right. There is no such thing as a t-shirt, f-hole or g-string, and anyone who tells you otherwise is lying.

GeoffC
01-11-2013, 01:34 PM
eee by 'eck !