View Full Version : Bad news for the Kobo battery.


chas0039
10-15-2010, 07:01 PM
I was looking into Kobo as a viable reader and when I asked questions about battery replacement, I was told there is no option for this and Kobo will not replace the battery. She said that you are expected to throw it away and buy a new one every 3 years.

I guess you could just figure it is like a set of tires, but even Amazon will replace your Kindle battery for $60. Maybe I am getting old, but the idea of so many battery powered gadgets with a 3 year life until it is trashed just seems wrong.

taming
10-15-2010, 07:36 PM
I get that on a purely theoretical level--but given how the technology is changing and the price points we are seeing, I really doubt that I will want to use a 3 year old reader anyway.

PS: Spending $60 for a battery when one paid the price that Amazon was charging in 2007 was one thing. Paying it now, after getting 3 years of service out of it and given the price drop is just different.

sabredog
10-15-2010, 07:59 PM
In three years time I would expect to own a much different device than now, especially the way that ereader technology is changing.

Solicitous
10-16-2010, 12:08 AM
How are you coming to a 3 year life of the Kobo? Given the batteries in most consumer electronics are calculated at between 300-500 charge cycles, IF you charge the Kobo once per week (worst case scenario), that equals 50 times a year. At worst you'd be looking at 6 years before the battery starts to decade (under ideal conditions).

If you take a look at the wiki here on the forums you'll see pics of a Kobo dismantled, so if in as you are saying 3 years the battery needs replacing, you should be able to dismantle the Kobo and replace the battery with relative ease. Provided the same voltage (and at least the same mah to keep good uptime between charges) battery is used you'd be fine.

Then again as others have pointed out with changes in technology etc, it is more probable you would have replaced it with a newer model because you want to rather than the Kobo is all worn out.

Ultimately if you are worried about battery replacement you could look at the Eco Reader, it uses a standard Nokia mobile battery, which is user replaceable.

chas0039
10-16-2010, 11:47 AM
How are you coming to a 3 year life of the Kobo? Given the batteries in most consumer electronics are calculated at between 300-500 charge cycles, IF you charge the Kobo once per week (worst case scenario), that equals 50 times a year. At worst you'd be looking at 6 years before the battery starts to decade (under ideal conditions).

If you take a look at the wiki here on the forums you'll see pics of a Kobo dismantled, so if in as you are saying 3 years the battery needs replacing, you should be able to dismantle the Kobo and replace the battery with relative ease. Provided the same voltage (and at least the same mah to keep good uptime between charges) battery is used you'd be fine.

Then again as others have pointed out with changes in technology etc, it is more probable you would have replaced it with a newer model because you want to rather than the Kobo is all worn out.

Ultimately if you are worried about battery replacement you could look at the Eco Reader, it uses a standard Nokia mobile battery, which is user replaceable.

I am using 3 years as the maximum life of these batteries, based on technical web sites devoted to batteries. They seem to have a useful life regardless of the number of charge cycles. They start to die from the date of manufacture whether used or not.

While many people will want to get newer stuff, I want to get more useful life out of what I have, and there just don't seem to be any real advances coming for essentially, that which is just one page at a time. I don't play with my eReader, I read it. I was also amazed that they told me that they assume I will throw it away when the battery wears out. It just struck me as a poor choice of words.

In any case, I found another nook that I can softroot, so I am fine, replaceable battery and all.

chas0039
10-16-2010, 12:04 PM
I get that on a purely theoretical level--but given how the technology is changing and the price points we are seeing, I really doubt that I will want to use a 3 year old reader anyway.

PS: Spending $60 for a battery when one paid the price that Amazon was charging in 2007 was one thing. Paying it now, after getting 3 years of service out of it and given the price drop is just different.

No argument, but $60 is the Amazon price. I can do it myself for $21. After 3 years, that might get some people to just keep using the same old reader. Remember, they want you to buy books, not readers. They have a totally different marketing plan.

HarryT
10-16-2010, 12:17 PM
I am using 3 years as the maximum life of these batteries, based on technical web sites devoted to batteries. They seem to have a useful life regardless of the number of charge cycles. They start to die from the date of manufacture whether used or not.


A typical lithium ion battery will probably have lost about a quarter to a third of its capacity after three years. There are many people still using Sony PRS-500 Readers, which are now more than 4 years old, which still have an eminently usable battery life.

chas0039
10-20-2010, 08:24 PM
If I am able to get that many years out of my nook or Kindle batteries I will be overjoyed. Unfortunately, I have not ever seen this with any Li-Ion battery so far. I am glad to hear that the Sonys are doing so well. They charge over $120 to change their battery.

Thanks for the info. I really hope you are right.

dos
10-23-2010, 12:20 AM
This is pretty unacceptable. A company should stand behind their product for life, within reason. three years is not a long time, especially for those of us without a lot of money to just buy new things all the time.

This is called planned obsolescence is is intentional.

SameerH
10-23-2010, 12:51 AM
I'm not an electrical engineer, but let's see if I can help shed some light.

We use a lithium-ion polymer battery, which boasts a better degradation rate than Lithium-ion.

The numbers we received on the battery:

Testing shows 80% retentive capacity remaining after 300 charge cycles (charging it from 2.75V to 4.2V). That's about 5 years @ 1 cycle per week.

Slap some conservatism on there (say 60%) and you're left with 3 years to get down to 80% retentive capacity.

jackdeth191
10-23-2010, 01:10 AM
In fairness, it's also quite likely that in 3 years (or say 1.5-2) if you're the sort that's not shy about opening electronics you can replace the battery yourself...

However, FWIW my original sony reader prs-500 (purchased ~2 weeks after they were released) had a usable battery life ) right up to when I sent it to sony for a firmware upgrade 33 days ago (however apparently something broke during the time that they apparently lost my reader resulting in me no longer wishing to support sony). So I'm not too worried about the battery's life. (hence why I just pre-ordered a wireless kobo ;) ) Erm, sorry for the mini rant, I'm still annoyed by $ony.

Really, I'm just thankful that kobo has given us something to buy other than the reader for those of us that like the idea of using a public library...

dos
10-23-2010, 01:41 AM
Slap some conservatism on there (say 60%) and you're left with 3 years to get down to 80% retentive capacity.

That's really not bad at all. I still think Kobo should have some kind of battery replacement program, hell you could even charge some amount for it and make the customer pay shipping. Still better than buying a new device.

Batteries are fickle and very greatly depending on the user's habits. Many people don't know how to use a device properly to maximize the lifespan of the battery.

chas0039
10-23-2010, 10:02 AM
I'm not an electrical engineer, but let's see if I can help shed some light.

We use a lithium-ion polymer battery, which boasts a better degradation rate than Lithium-ion.

The numbers we received on the battery:

Testing shows 80% retentive capacity remaining after 300 charge cycles (charging it from 2.75V to 4.2V). That's about 5 years @ 1 cycle per week.

Slap some conservatism on there (say 60%) and you're left with 3 years to get down to 80% retentive capacity.

I am also not an engineer, but every site that is full of engineers says that these batteries start to die from the date of manufacture. They add that you can shorten the life with heat, but no where do they say you can extend the life beyond what it is. You are commenting on the effects of charging cycles. This is not the life span based on the manufacture date.

In any case, I hope you are right as, otherwise, I would assume a lot of annoyed users.

TonyToews
10-24-2010, 07:43 PM
I was able to purchase a replacement battery for my nine year old Palm on Ebay complete with itty bitty screwdrive for under $20 including shipping. And the new battery is working just fine for the past two or three years. So give it a year or two and I'm sure the third party market place will handle this just fine.

CazMar
10-24-2010, 08:34 PM
Is it my imagination of do these devices last longer with some people than other? I still have my first Sandisk Sansa MP3 player - still working in a slightly wonky way after being crushed and repaired at home with bits soldered on. The 2nd Sandisk still works perfectly and is over 3 years old. My ancient Nokia phone is now about 10 years old, we recharge it for use by overseas relatives when they visit Australia. Yet my lovely husband, a genius with anything mechanical, can reduce a phone or any electronic device to waste within about 12 months!
I'll bet my Kobo is still working in 5 years time. Oh, and I still have a working 1995 Cassiopaeia (but it didn't have rechargeable batteries).

SameerH
10-24-2010, 08:40 PM
Is it my imagination of do these devices last longer with some people than other? I still have my first Sandisk Sansa MP3 player - still working in a slightly wonky way after being crushed and repaired at home with bits soldered on. The 2nd Sandisk still works perfectly and is over 3 years old. My ancient Nokia phone is now about 10 years old, we recharge it for use by overseas relatives when they visit Australia. Yet my lovely husband, a genius with anything mechanical, can reduce a phone or any electronic device to waste within about 12 months!
I'll bet my Kobo is still working in 5 years time. Oh, and I still have a working 1995 Cassiopaeia (but it didn't have rechargeable batteries).

I had a Cassiopaeia too! Nice little device, but had to forego it for the then-ahead-of-its-time Palm/Handspring Treo.

digital_steve
10-24-2010, 08:45 PM
I have 2 psion 3c's, a psion 7 and a psion netbook pro
Do i win the old technology award?!

also, i actually use my psion 3c daily

sabredog
10-24-2010, 08:50 PM
I only recently got rid of my Cassiopeia. Still worked fine.

corona
10-25-2010, 01:10 AM
Look at all those Priuses out there, too! (Anyway, whatever the plural of Prius is. Prii?)

thufir
05-30-2011, 01:08 PM
For the eager and manually adept...it looks like the specs on the Kobo battery are:

H503456 1000mAh 3.7v

One manufacturer's website info on this battery:

http://www.alibaba.com/product-gs/375453071/li_ion_polymer_battery_H503456_1000mah.html

A picture of Kobo disassembled, showing battery:

https://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/prod/oet/forms/blobs/retrieve.cgi?attachment_id=1258420&native_or_pdf=pdf

So...all we need is some enterprising person to buy a lot of 1000 batteries, and turn around and sell them on eBay to the rest of us. It looks like the batteries could be bought for $2 a piece. I would be willing to buy one for $20. The break even point is selling 100; the chance for profit is pretty good!

smoggy
06-06-2011, 02:03 PM
I'm thinking about using just the power leads from the USB cable,
and making a small external battery source. Pinouts & specs
appear easy, and with an external batttery I should be able to
get better than the day to day and a half I'm currently getting.

I'm not a "technician" in any sense of the word, but I am tired of
having my Kobo die every time I want to read.

Google for USB specs, you can easily find pinouts. 2 rechargable
AA batteries should suffice, a very short USB cord, shorten as
needed, and a bit of velcro to the back of the case, and I should
be able to go away for a weekend without having to bring along
my laptop so I can recharge.

I'm not going to try this until KOBO tech support abandons me,
although it is getting very lonely out there.

Anybody have that lived through the warranty period?

smoggy
06-06-2011, 06:16 PM
Ok, after talking, I did some hunting around and there are a few external USB battery devices available on Amazon, do a search for Kobo Battery, there are a couple wall chargers, and a car charger. The Battery pack, contrary to my above post, would use 4 AA batteries.

smoggy
06-15-2011, 05:42 PM
Follow up & hopefully some good news.

I spoke in Email with the Ceo, and by phone with the tech support senior Manager.
There is an engineer reading my comments & problems, and is testing a unit to ensure
it meets all advertised specs, & within a week I should have me a ne trouble free Kobo.

Many Thanks to the Kobo Senior Management

filmo
06-18-2011, 08:43 PM
Might try Minty Boost charger kit.

smallhagrid
08-26-2011, 01:15 PM
I have a Kobo that is around a year old and it's battery is discharging at an outrageous rate - even when 'asleep'.
Being out of warranty I would merrily open it up and see about replacing the wee thing.
I also have a thing that uses 4 AA batteries with a mini-USB connector which will power it.
Aside of this one problem I consider the Kobo my 2nd best reader, after the EZReader.

I will now search for a non-Alibaba source of a single H503456 1000mAh 3.7v battery.
(And BTW - Borders is blowing Kobos out at their stores for $60 - nice deal !)

Edit/addition:
A post here about the Pocket Book 360 mentions what appears to be the same battery, and it is found here:
[/URL][url]http://www.sparkfun.com/products/339 (http://www.sparkfun.com/products/339)

For about $12 = shipping.

Has anyone tried this in a Kobo ?

J. Strnad
08-27-2011, 01:42 PM
The non-replaceable-battery thing really irks me. I hate our disposable culture, where it's cheaper to toss stuff in the landfill and replace it than it is to repair it, even when that "repair" is nothing more than replacing a battery.

geormes
08-27-2011, 04:50 PM
How many other e-readers secure their batteries with glue??

RolandD
08-28-2011, 02:20 AM
Ok, after talking, I did some hunting around and there are a few external USB battery devices available on Amazon, do a search for Kobo Battery, there are a couple wall chargers, and a car charger. The Battery pack, contrary to my above post, would use 4 AA batteries.

Google for USB specs, you can easily find pinouts. 2 rechargable AA batteries should suffice, a very short USB cord, shorten as
needed, and a bit of velcro to the back of the case, and I should
be able to go away for a weekend without having to bring along
my laptop so I can recharge.



Most any mini-USB phone charger will charge the Kobo. Ours only plugs into the computer to transfer books.

OneandonlyDoc
08-28-2011, 11:06 AM
Most any mini-USB phone charger will charge the Kobo. Ours only plugs into the computer to transfer books.

Yeah, my sister has used her phone charger to charge her Kobo, and I have a feeling my iPod charger (once I find it again) will do the job as well.

luqmaninbmore
08-28-2011, 07:44 PM
The non-replaceable-battery thing really irks me. I hate our disposable culture, where it's cheaper to toss stuff in the landfill and replace it than it is to repair it, even when that "repair" is nothing more than replacing a battery.

That's why I purchased my Toshiba Thrive. It's the only Android Tablet that I know of that has an easily replaceable battery. I want to be using this thing five years from now, God willing.

Tony1988
08-28-2011, 08:16 PM
I was looking into Kobo as a viable reader and when I asked questions about battery replacement, I was told there is no option for this and Kobo will not replace the battery. She said that you are expected to throw it away and buy a new one every 3 years.

I guess you could just figure it is like a set of tires, but even Amazon will replace your Kindle battery for $60. Maybe I am getting old, but the idea of so many battery powered gadgets with a 3 year life until it is trashed just seems wrong.

I wouldnt lose sleep over it. Chances are in either 3 years something else wil catch your eye or you will just replace the battery yourself. These batteries are a dime a dozen. There is always someone online who makes tutorials for battery replacement on items like this. Its not hard to do.

One thing I like about the sony ereaders is they have a case that is screwed shut. So its easy to open and replace the battery. Unfortunately the current kobo, and nook are a little harder to get into.
Since the new sonys coming out in october are going to be all plastic I am sure they will be harder to open as well. So Im keeping my 650.:thumbsup:

filmo
08-28-2011, 10:31 PM
Kobo Wifi is easy to open and replace the battery after you find replacement battery.

molman
08-29-2011, 12:06 AM
I don't think people will be to fussed about the battery not being easily replicable in a ~US$130 eReader when many of them are forking out for hundreds (if not thousands) of dollars for phones and notebook/laptops without user replicable batteries (looking at you Apple).

As others said there will likely be a 3rd party market for those so inclined when the time comes, and for those on the go something like the MintyBoost (http://www.adafruit.com/products/14) or commercial alternatives are great.

This guy (or girl) even hacked some solar panels into their Kobo (http://www.instructables.com/id/Solar-charging-ereader/?ALLSTEPS). Just find sun to top up :)

H3g3m0n
03-14-2012, 07:38 AM
It's planned obsolescence, there's a good documentary on it:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1xt4nEvipg

Apple was actually sued over a similar thing with their iPod batteries. Now they offer a replacement service.

Of course the price to replace the battery vs the cost of a new updated version is so close just about everyone will buy the new product.

Plus once the battery fails, it's not going to be to long before the flash memory follows which would be another repair.

nogle
03-14-2012, 11:43 AM
It's planned obsolescence, there's a good documentary on it:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1xt4nEvipg

Apple was actually sued over a similar thing with their iPod batteries. Now they offer a replacement service.

Of course the price to replace the battery vs the cost of a new updated version is so close just about everyone will buy the new product.

Plus once the battery fails, it's not going to be to long before the flash memory follows which would be another repair.

There is a (subtle) difference between planned obsolescence and mean time to failure.

Mean time to failure - your Kobo battery will last on average for x charges.

Planned obsolescence - Kobo is introducing a new eBook format that will not be supported on readers produced prior to XX/YY/ZZZZ

kyriu
03-15-2012, 11:12 AM
I am also not an engineer, but every site that is full of engineers says that these batteries start to die from the date of manufacture. They add that you can shorten the life with heat, but no where do they say you can extend the life beyond what it is. You are commenting on the effects of charging cycles. This is not the life span based on the manufacture date.

In any case, I hope you are right as, otherwise, I would assume a lot of annoyed users.

I might notice that we all start to die the moment we are born. The rate of decay is what matters. On other hand, it is a valid comment that it is of generally no use to buy extra batteries thinking on using them some years from now.

smallhagrid
03-16-2012, 02:34 AM
As previously posted:
Polymer Lithium Ion Battery - 1000mAh 3.7V
Dimensions: 2.09 x 1.3 x 0.225" (53 x 33 x 5.7 mm)
$11.95, not in stock but backorders are allowed.
http://www.sparkfun.com/products/339

I will certainly want to replace mine when it is needed rather than getting a new reader (with features I like less) or using an external battery pack.

What folks see in the newer touch screen wireless readers is beyond me because I live & work in a rural area & none of that internet stuff does me a whisker of good.
Not only that - my EZ Reader is perfect just as it is & needs nothing right now.

BWinmill
03-16-2012, 02:49 AM
I'm a pretty firm believer that the customer should decide when to replace a device, not the vendor (or engineers) so their attitude over batteries is disappointing to say the least. At least within reason. By that I mean that 20 years is probably unreasonably long, yet 3 years is unreasonably short.

Now I suppose that it doesn't have to be the vendor that supplies the replacement components, but it would be nice if they did. That's especially true for batteries that have a short lifespan, and because rechargable batteries seems to be a bit of a black art. (I'm a physicist damn it, not a chemical engineer. I would hate to see how confusing it is for someone who pursued interests outside of the sciences.)

dragon77
03-16-2012, 03:22 AM
3 years is a conservative estimate for when the battery will hold 80% of its original full capacity, which is far from being useless. It could very well still be able to operate at 50% capacity after 10 years, and that's not bad considering that still means at least several days between charges.

Unless you have a faulty battery to begin with it really should be many years before it's an issue. Other components of the device will probably fail before the battery becomes useless.

Solicitous
03-16-2012, 10:13 AM
There is a (subtle) difference between planned obsolescence and mean time to failure.

Mean time to failure - your Kobo battery will last on average for x charges.

Planned obsolescence - Kobo is introducing a new eBook format that will not be supported on readers produced prior to XX/YY/ZZZZ

Would one not also consider lack of further support to be planned obsolescence? I mean Kobo are still selling the wifi model but no further updates/bug fixes have been seen in a LONG time, well before the Kobo touch was released.

Anyway I dislike consumerism. Why can't one buy an ereader with a replaceable battery? My Astak has one (though can't buy a battery anywhere for it).

If someone released a Pearl e-ink reader, page turn buttons and replaceable battery with a SD slot (not micro) I'm buying.

winsomnia
03-16-2012, 03:26 PM
If someone released a Pearl e-ink reader, page turn buttons and replaceable battery with a SD slot (not micro) I'm buying.

Yes. Also, add e-pub compatible to that list and it's darn near perfect for me.

frankieGom
03-16-2012, 06:26 PM
One thing I like about the sony ereaders is they have a case that is screwed shut. So its easy to open and replace the battery. Unfortunately the current kobo, and nook are a little harder to get into.
If you don't cut your nails too short the Kobo Touch can easily be opened with bare hands!

BWinmill
03-17-2012, 01:00 AM
Anyway I dislike consumerism. Why can't one buy an ereader with a replaceable battery? My Astak has one (though can't buy a battery anywhere for it).


You can pry the back off of the Touch (and Vox) and the battery is plugged into the circuit board. The main problem is finding a suitable replacement since very little seems to be standardized any more.

smallhagrid
03-31-2012, 12:35 AM
...My Astak has one (though can't buy a battery anywhere for it).

As it happens, I just learned the EZ Readers take 2 different (and quite cheap/common) Nokia phone batteries as exact & perfect replacements.
Since I have a Nokia phone I bought that was defective I looked in it and presto - it had the stronger of the 2 choices, so in it went and I can also use the dead phone as an external charger if needed; it's kinda neat !

Regarding the Kobo's need, I bet if I opened mine up I could figure out how to get a matching cellular battery wired in there; might need a smidgin of soldering to do it though...:thumbsup:

lkings
10-09-2012, 02:57 PM
I was looking into Kobo as a viable reader and when I asked questions about battery replacement, I was told there is no option for this and Kobo will not replace the battery. She said that you are expected to throw it away and buy a new one every 3 years.

I guess you could just figure it is like a set of tires, but even Amazon will replace your Kindle battery for $60. Maybe I am getting old, but the idea of so many battery powered gadgets with a 3 year life until it is trashed just seems wrong.

I got my Kobo Desktop for Christmas last year & its stopped working, I think its the battery- thats less than a year. As it was a gift, I don't know for sure where it was bought, nor do I have a receipt, neither does the person who gave it to me.

PeterT
10-09-2012, 03:00 PM
Can you clarify what you mean please by a "Kobo Desktop"..

RT Wolf
11-30-2013, 09:01 PM
I bought a kobo mini for someone but the screen broke and she was upset so I decided to fix it. She really loves it and they're pretty much out of stock everywhere I looked (or $80). While it's under warranty, Kobo said it was user caused damage so they refused to repair or replace it. Found a kobo mini on craigslist for $25 that only worked when plugged in after being dunked in water but the screen was fine. Something up with the battery.

So I opened up the broken screen kobo mini (let's call it KM1) and the broken battery kobo mini (KM2) using these instructions: http://www.mobileread.com/forums/showthread.php?t=193321

I decided to move the entire internals from KM1 into KM2 (battery + PCB + SD card) to save the books. The battery was glued in place so I got a plastic knife and carefully removed both batteries and swapped them. Got a little bent up at the edges but seemed fine. Then I put the PCB in place (watch for the switch at the top of body to align properly with the one on the PCB), re-attached the ribbon for the screen (they had different numbers on them but that didn't seem to matter), and attached the battery's plug.

The battery plug was actually very, very finicky. Even when it appeared to be seated properly, it needed to be pushed down more towards the USB plug edge. So be careful to make sure the metal contacts actually touch each other. Also be careful with those cause they break easily. I broke the battery's plug on KM2 without even trying. Got really lucky that KM1's battery didn't break when I was removing it, otherwise I may have had to pay for a new battery as well. KM1 seems more recently made (has the 4GB microsd card) so maybe they improved the design. Anyhoo, be careful with that plug and also with the other end. Some more tips: https://www.sparkfun.com/tutorials/241

Replaced the screws for PCB and then for the back cover and it seems to be working fine. So it is possible to swap the PCB and battery from a kobo with a broken screen to one without a broken screen.

I'm gonna make sure she gets a damn case this time. :p

I hate to grave-dig but this thread came up in google searches and I thought I'd contribute my experience for any future googlers. :)

Cheers!

Kasper Hviid
12-01-2013, 10:56 AM
@RT Wolf: Thanks for your contribution, and for resurrecting this important thread! Whether the battery could be replaced was an aspect I was completely unaware of when I bought my Kobo. (It might have been a deal breaker if I had seen this thread back then)

HarryT
12-01-2013, 10:58 AM
@RT Wolf: Thanks for your contribution, and for resurrecting this important thread! Whether the battery could be replaced was an aspect I was completely unaware of when I bought my Kobo. (It might have been a deal breaker if I had seen this thread back then)

None of the "mainstream" reading devices have batteries which are designed to be user-replaceable. All can be replaced, but some make you work a lot harder to do so (eg by having a glued-in battery) than others. It can vary even between different models in the same range - eg a "Basic" Kindle has a glued-in battery which is extremely difficult to replace, while a Kindle Paperwhite has a battery which isn't glued, and is very easy to replace.

filmo
12-01-2013, 11:29 AM
I would cut battery wires and solder replacement battery wires with battery to old connector wires. Easier for me with solder skills and equipment. Poke wires through sheet of paper to shield circuit board from solder drips.

Ken Maltby
12-01-2013, 03:44 PM
Ah.. the Jetbook Lite makes a great backup reader that uses 4ea AA batteries.

In three years there may be a much improved battery that could replace the existing internal kobo battery. It is just glued in place and connected with two wires into a connector on the PCB. If nothing else you would be able to just strip and solder the new battery leads to the old battery leads, with the connector.

Luck;
Ken

speakingtohe
12-01-2013, 04:27 PM
Ah.. the Jetbook Lite makes a great backup reader that uses 4ea AA batteries.

In three years there may be a much improved battery that could replace the existing internal kobo battery. It is just glued in place and connected with two wires into a connector on the PCB. If nothing else you would be able to just strip and solder the new battery leads to the old battery leads, with the connector.

Luck;
Ken

I've been lucky in that all of my batteries work even those 3+years old. But if one failed and I still wanted to use that reader, I'd be soldering away. Nothing to lose at that point and I have done a fair bit of soldering.

Helen

Ken Maltby
12-01-2013, 04:57 PM
None of the "mainstream" reading devices have batteries which are designed to be user-replaceable. All can be replaced, but some make you work a lot harder to do so (eg by having a glued-in battery) than others. It can vary even between different models in the same range - eg a "Basic" Kindle has a glued-in battery which is extremely difficult to replace, while a Kindle Paperwhite has a battery which isn't glued, and is very easy to replace.

A length of dental floss worked under the battery can usually do the trick.
If you know a safe glue solvent, adding that to the floss might make it even easier.

Luck;
Ken

speakingtohe
12-01-2013, 05:01 PM
A length of dental floss worked under the battery can usually do the trick.
If you know a safe glue solvent, adding that to the floss might make it even easier.

Luck;
Ken

A good tip I would never thought of. Could be used in other situations where something is stuck on and you don't want to use a solvent or as little solvent as possible.

Helen

Ken Maltby
12-01-2013, 05:31 PM
A good tip I would never thought of. Could be used in other situations where something is stuck on and you don't want to use a solvent or as little solvent as possible.

Helen

One of the reasons to use this approach is to limit the torque applied to both the PCB and the part you would be unsticking. There are probably a lot of situations where it might come in handy.

Luck;
Ken

filmo
12-02-2013, 01:58 AM
When I bought my Kobo Wifi a Canadian company sold replacement battery for it. Have not seen this recently.

Ken Maltby
12-02-2013, 02:17 AM
When I bought my Kobo Wifi a Canadian company sold replacement battery for it. Have not seen this recently.

If you have opened it up and can see the battery it is likely that they have it installed with the with the information you will need to find a compatible battery, perhaps even one with more mAh, printed on top of the battery. You can measure the physical size constraints as well. You can search the internet using the part number and the battery sites will usually list compatible replacement and upgrade batteries. The main property of the battery that you need to maintain is the voltage, that is what you need to maintain so that the charging circuit can do its job. Most devices have some voltage regulation and current limiting, so there is more leeway for powering the device than charging the battery, as far as the spec.s of the battery is concerned.

Luck;
Ken

RobertJSawyer
12-02-2013, 12:54 PM
This is a problem across the consumer-electronics industry. It will take legislation in the US or the EU or Japan requiring consumer-replaceable batteries (as a way of combating the ever-growing problem of otherwise usable electronics ending up in landfill) before manufacturers will address this issue, I think.

Ken Maltby
12-02-2013, 01:24 PM
This is a problem across the consumer-electronics industry. It will take legislation in the US or the EU or Japan requiring consumer-replaceable batteries (as a way of combating the ever-growing problem of otherwise usable electronics ending up in landfill) before manufacturers will address this issue, I think.

I would think someone coming up with an efficient and profitable materials reclamation process, for electronics, would be a better and more workable solution. (For the SciFi writer, picture a vat of nanobots at the recycle site that would extract the precious metals, pure silicon, and/or other materials that the manufacturers need, use and have applied in a manner consistent with the extraction process.) For the rest of us; the manufacturers adopt the use of a class of plastic/composite that is easily dissolved and returned to a precursor state. Cases and PCB would be dissolved leaving naked components, copper and silver tracings; processing for these might be melting temperature based, with alloys used to make them compliant.

Perhaps these recycling companies would be selling the "toner" for 3D printers that could recreate the devices recycled, or many other devices.

Luck;
Ken

Of course for the EU and Canada, appointing a new set of bureaucrats to hamper production would be the way to go.

Markismus
12-03-2013, 08:20 AM
In the EU the bureaucrats seem that far removed from everyday life that they only function as a real-life soap.

I am a bit surprised that your nanite-SF still wants to rely on companies. Shouldn't an everyday household generate enough of waste materials to produce whatever the kids think of printing?

Isn't the real hamper on production that consumers and producers are geographically separated? The real money is still in trade and distribution. That is because they are, especially in nanite-SF superfluous. They have to get the money, when the getting is still good.

speedhump
12-05-2013, 02:42 PM
DIY Kobo battery replacement? Why not? Instead of all you guys complaining use your energy to DO IT YOURSELF. I must admit that I have not yet found a cheap (i.e. under $10), suitable battery yet, but I have buggered up the battery connection. That's easy to do! So take my tip: - If you do get a new battery for it do not attempt to unplug the connection. Mine would not unplug, but it did break off beautifully. So make the new connection by using the already attached wiring, leaving that tricky little board connection well alone. Good Luck!

Ken Maltby
12-05-2013, 04:26 PM
The connectors can be tricky. If I have no information on how the connection is made, I usually end up probing the connection with a toothpick to find where the parts separate. For my AuraHD the battery connector appears to lift straight up off the PCB, not slide out towards the leads, as many connections are made.

Instead of a cheaper replacement, I would be looking for a better battery.

Luck;
Ken

Julie Lake
02-08-2014, 12:39 AM
I've had my Kobo Glow for less than 2 years and already the battery has to be recharged far more frequently. And I have very rarely used the in-built light, too. It's an excellent e-reader but I do think the battery ought to be a little longer-lived - the cheap Hanvon I had before didn't have to be recharged nearly so often. I agree the technology changes regularly but for those of us who only want e-reader on which to download and read books, we really don't need changes that are too frequent.

Conductor
02-08-2014, 02:57 AM
I really appreciate Mobile Read Forums and the cast of Experts and Amateurs willing to offer their experiences and knowledge. I fall into the latter category, but I wanted offer what I've found is a great source of information on things electrical--especially the good and bad of various battery types. It's 'rathah British, don't you know' but very informative.
It's on the web as "The Electropaedia", and found at mpoweruk.com/index.htm.
No product sales, just info.

danskmacabre
02-08-2014, 08:56 AM
We have 4 Kobo Ereaders in our house.
2 Kobo touches and 2 Kobo Glos

Now obviously as the Kobo Glos are still fairly new (less than a year old I think), battery life is still great, but then they're still pretty new.

But I bought the Kobo Touches very close to when they were released in the USA (I imported them).
They are still used daily, as my wife and I gave them to our kids when we got Kobo Touches.
Battery life on the Touches are still fantastic. I can't put numbers on it, so all I can say is I've not felt that they have reduced battery life.
I expect I wouldn't notice a 20% reduction in battery life anyway.
I DO know my kids read them in bed at night and mornings and quite a bit over the weekends at any time.
They generally never get fully run down and get charged up every few weeks.
Say 3 on an average, sometimes more sometimes less.
Usually more frequently on school holidays.

jackastor
02-08-2014, 03:55 PM
I get that on a purely theoretical level--but given how the technology is changing and the price points we are seeing, I really doubt that I will want to use a 3 year old reader anyway.

PS: Spending $60 for a battery when one paid the price that Amazon was charging in 2007 was one thing. Paying it now, after getting 3 years of service out of it and given the price drop is just different.

Some of us though just collect the things out of a pure physical OCD need to do so, and some of us well with ebay cheap batteries are only a postal service away from us in China.

regards

Jack

bookgrrl
08-12-2014, 06:35 AM
I have a two-year-old Kobo Glo with a battery life that's already shot.

I have to charge it at least once a day, since the battery level goes from 100% to 60% after a couple hours of reading. I do use the backlight (that's why I got a Glo) and so I wasn't expecting the battery to last one month, but I wasn't expecting to have to charge it once a day.

The battery loses its charge even when the device is in sleep mode. If I charge the battery to 100% and leave it in sleep mode overnight, the next morning the battery level is down to 80%.

samhy
08-13-2014, 06:06 AM
The battery loses its charge even when the device is in sleep mode. If I charge the battery to 100% and leave it in sleep mode overnight, the next morning the battery level is down to 80%.

Can you see something touching the screen while the device is in sleep mode? There's a thread regarding this issue.

filmo
08-13-2014, 08:40 AM
That bug was caused by a cover with inside pocket that would touched screen while reader was going into sleep mode or off. More likely to happen if reader was turned off by magnet in cover because inside pocket was touching screen. Reader would go into endless loop trying to register touch and couldn't turn off causing the battery to discharge quicker. Power and sleep setting to auto turn off never was user fix you can try. This bug was fixed by a firmware update but this wouldn't be first time a Kobo bug returned with new firmware update.

vandafc
08-13-2014, 10:52 AM
I was looking into Kobo as a viable reader and when I asked questions about battery replacement, I was told there is no option for this and Kobo will not replace the battery. She said that you are expected to throw it away and buy a new one every 3 years.

I guess you could just figure it is like a set of tires, but even Amazon will replace your Kindle battery for $60. Maybe I am getting old, but the idea of so many battery powered gadgets with a 3 year life until it is trashed just seems wrong.

$60 is the price of a new kindle right? :D

062604
08-31-2014, 06:20 PM
I have an original Kobo that is now 5 years old. I only use it for knitting patterns, not reading anymore, but the battery is still great (and I probably use it at least 5 times/week for a couple of hours at a time). I think I still charge it less than once a month.

My glo gets a lot of use and is about 2 years old. I maybe charge it every 6 weeks or so.

Julie Lake
09-05-2014, 05:25 AM
No matter what anyone says I still think the Kobo battery life is NOT long enough, or else there should be some easy and cheap recharging/replacement option. I'm not worried about imrovements to the technology within three years - I like my Glo fine the way it is (mostly); don't need to upgrade and as these devices are expensive I can't afford to, either. Next time I shall look at any ereader that offers a better battery experience.

Canuck_in_Japan
09-05-2014, 08:11 AM
I think most readers on here have problems not upgrading their reader every year so I think battery degradation is the least of our concerns! :)
With that said, I have no idea how long my Kobo readers last but I know that they last long enough that the infrequent times that I have to charge them it doesn't bother me at all.

Stephjk
09-05-2014, 10:44 AM
My Glo is 18 months old and I have to charge it roughly once a week. I do read for several hours a day though so, as the advertised reading time per charge is about 15 hours, I'm still pretty happy with it.