MobileRead Forums
Register Guidelines E-Books Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Sat June 27 2015

MobileRead Week in Review: 06/20 - 06/27

06:00 AM by Alexander Turcic in Miscellaneous | Week in Review

Gosh we've talked a lot this week. Here's your weekly round up of MobileRead's events.

E-Book General - News

E-Book General - Reading Recommendations


Advertisement

July 2015 Book Club Vote

12:04 AM by WT Sharpe in Reading Recommendations | Book Clubs

July 2015 MobileRead Book Club Vote

Help us choose a book as the July 2015 eBook for the MobileRead Book Club. The poll will be open for 5 days. There will be no runoff vote unless the voting results a tie, in which case there will be a 3 day run-off poll. This is a visible poll: others can see how you voted. It is You may cast a vote for each book that appeals to you.

We will start the discussion thread for this book on July 20th. Select from the following Official Choices with three nominations each:

The Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Patricia Clark Memorial Library: Kindle | Project Gutenberg: Various formats | Librivox (audiobook)

Spoiler:
From Wikipedia:

Meditations (Medieval Greek: Τὰ εἰς ἑαυτόν Ta eis heauton, literally "[that which is] to himself") is a series of personal writings by Marcus Aurelius, Roman Emperor from 161 to 180 CE, recording his private notes to himself and ideas on Stoic philosophy.

Marcus Aurelius wrote the 12 books of the Meditations in Koine Greek as a source for his own guidance and self-improvement. It is possible that large portions of the work were written at Sirmium, where he spent much time planning military campaigns from 170 to 180. Some of it was written while he was positioned at Aquincum on campaign in Pannonia, because internal notes tell us that the second book was written when he was campaigning against the Quadi on the river Granova (modern-day Hron) and the third book was written at Carnuntum.

It is unlikely that Marcus Aurelius ever intended the writings to be published and the work has no official title, so "Meditations" is one of several titles commonly assigned to the collection. These writings take the form of quotations varying in length from one sentence to long paragraphs.

Pitching in a Pinch by Christy Mathewson
Amazon US / Barnes & Noble / Kobo

Spoiler:
This is considered one of the greatest baseball books ever written. Leopold Classic Library issued a new edition three months ago, calling it "a significant literary work."

Rites of Peace: The Fall of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna by Adam Zamoyski
Amazon US / Kobo US

Spoiler:
From Goodreads:

In the wake of Napoleon's disastrous Russian campaign of 1812, the French emperor's imperious grip on Europe began to weaken, raising the question of how the continent was to be reconstructed after his defeat. While the Treaty of Paris that followed Napoleon's exile in 1814 put an end to a quarter century of revolution and war in Europe, it left the future of the continent hanging in the balance.

Eager to negotiate a workable and lasting peace, the major powers—Britain, Austria, Prussia, and Russia—along with a host of lesser nations, began a series of committee sessions in Vienna: an eight-month-long carnival that combined political negotiations with balls, dinners, artistic performances, hunts, tournaments, picnics, and other sundry forms of entertainment for the thousands of aristocrats who had gathered in the Austrian capital. Although the Congress of Vienna resulted in an unprecedented level of stability in Europe, the price of peace would be high. Many of the crucial questions were decided on the battlefield or in squalid roadside cottages amid the vagaries of war. And the proceedings in Vienna itself were not as decorous as is usually represented.

Internationally bestselling author Adam Zamoyski draws on a wide range of original sources, which include not only official documents, private letters, diaries, and firsthand accounts, but also the reports of police spies and informers, to reveal the steamy atmosphere of greed and lust in which the new Europe was forged. Meticulously researched, masterfully told, and featuring a cast of some of the most influential and powerful figures in history, including Tsar Alexander, Metternich, Talleyrand, and the Duke of Wellington, Rites of Peace tells the story of these extraordinary events and their profound historical consequences.

The Beer Wench's Guide to Beer: An Unpretentious Guide to Craft Beer by Ashley V. Routson
Amazon US

Spoiler:
Pull up a stool and learn about beer with the Wench!

Craft beer is officially everywhere: there are now more breweries in the United States since any time before prohibition. At the local grocery store, the beer aisle is as big as the cereal aisle. At the bar, it's increasingly hard to choose a beer--the IPA is stronger than the ESB, right?

In this book, Ashley V. Routson (aka The Beer Wench) provides the first all-in-one guide that demystifies beer and makes learning fun. She'll quickly bring you up to speed on beer styles, the brewing process, how to taste beer like a pro, and how to pair beer with food. Unconventional tastings, delicious recipes from killer craft breweries, eye-catching photos--and, of course, plenty of beer--means there's never a dull moment.

This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women by Dan Gediman and Jay Allison
Amazon Ca / Amazon US / Barnes & Noble / Kobo

Spoiler:
From Goodreads

Based on the National Public Radio series of the same name, This I Believe features eighty essayists--from the famous to the unknown--completing the thought that begins the book's title. Each piece compels readers to rethink not only how they have arrived at their own personal beliefs but also the extent to which they share them with others.

Featuring a well-known list of contributors--including Isabel Allende, Colin Powell, Gloria Steinem, William F. Buckley Jr., Penn Jillette, Bill Gates, and John Updike--the collection also contains essays by a Brooklyn lawyer; a part-time hospital clerk from Rehoboth, Massachusetts; a woman who sells Yellow Pages advertising in Fort Worth, Texas; and a man who serves on the state of Rhode Island's parole board.

The result is a stirring and provocative trip inside the minds and hearts of a diverse group of people whose beliefs--and the incredibly varied ways in which they choose to express them--reveal the American spirit at its best.

What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by Randall Munroe
Amazon Ca / Amazon UK / Amazon US / Barnes and Noble / Google Play / Kobo US

Spoiler:
From Goodreads:

Randall Munroe left NASA in 2005 to start up his hugely popular site XKCD 'a web comic of romance, sarcasm, math and language' which offers a witty take on the world of science and geeks. It's had over a billion page hits to date. A year ago Munroe set up a new section - What If - where he tackles a series of impossible questions: If your cells suddenly lost the power to divide, how long would you survive? How dangerous is it, really, in a pool in a thunderstorm? If we hooked turbines to people exercising in gyms, how much power could we produce? What if everyone only had one soulmate? From what height would you need to drop a steak to ensure it was cooked by the time it reached the ground? What would happen if the moon went away? This book gathers together the best entries along with lots of new gems. From The Lord of the Rings, Star Trek and the songs of Tim Minchin, through chemistry, geography and physics, Munroe leaves no stone unturned in his quest for knowledge. And his answers are witty and memorable and studded with hilarious cartoons and infographics. Far more than a book for geeks, WHAT IF explains the laws of science in operation in a way that every intelligent reader will enjoy and feel the smarter for having read.

Waterloo by Bernard Cornwell
Amazon UK / Amazon US / Audible / Barnes & Noble / Overdrive

Spoiler:
#1 Bestseller in the U.K.

From the New York Times bestselling author and master of martial fiction comes the definitive, illustrated history of one of the greatest battles ever fought—a riveting nonfiction chronicle published to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Napoleon’s last stand.

On June 18, 1815 the armies of France, Britain and Prussia descended upon a quiet valley south of Brussels. In the previous three days, the French army had beaten the Prussians at Ligny and fought the British to a standstill at Quatre-Bras. The Allies were in retreat. The little village north of where they turned to fight the French army was called Waterloo. The blood-soaked battle to which it gave its name would become a landmark in European history.

In his first work of nonfiction, Bernard Cornwell combines his storytelling skills with a meticulously researched history to give a riveting chronicle of every dramatic moment, from Napoleon’s daring escape from Elba to the smoke and gore of the three battlefields and their aftermath. Through quotes from the letters and diaries of Emperor Napoleon, the Duke of Wellington, and the ordinary officers and soldiers, he brings to life how it actually felt to fight those famous battles—as well as the moments of amazing bravery on both sides that left the actual outcome hanging in the balance until the bitter end.

Published to coincide with the battle’s bicentennial in 2015, Waterloo is a tense and gripping story of heroism and tragedy—and of the final battle that determined the fate of nineteenth-century Europe.

[ 6 replies - poll! ]


Fri June 26 2015

Scribd acquires Librify

04:33 AM by AnemicOak in E-Book General | News

Scribd, the subscription e-book service, has acquired Librify, a subscription e-book and social reading platform launched in 2014 that also offers e-book retailing.

Librify launched with a partnership with mass market retailer Target. For $6.99 a month, Librify subscribers received free access to one e-book each month recommended by Target, and could purchase the rest of Librify’s inventory of about 1 million e-books at a discount of 10% to 20% off list price. An early version of the subscription e-book model, Librify combined Target-recommended, discounted e-books with a social reading platform that enabled users to meet online and discuss, list and share the books they were reading.

http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/b...s-librify.html

Also...
http://www.digitalbookworld.com/2015...ial-e-reading/
http://www.thebookseller.com/news/sc...librify-304953

[ 6 replies ]


Mon June 22 2015

UK Right to Personal Copy Over-turned?

07:38 AM by latepaul in E-Book General | News

Several music industry organizations in the UK have won a judicial review which renders the Government's decision to allow copying for personal use unlawful. According to the High Court, there's insufficient evidence to prove that the legislation doesn't hurt musicians and the industry at large.

While the groups are not against private copying exceptions, they disagreed with the Government’s conclusion that the change would cause no financial harm to the music industry.

Instead of keeping copies free, they suggested that a tax should be applied to blank media including blank CDs, hard drives, memory sticks and other blank media. This money would then be shared among rightsholders, a mechanism already operating in other European countries.

Today the High Court largely agreed with the music industry groups.

See here

Whilst the case was brought by bodies in the music industry, and IANAL, I can't see why this wouldn't also apply to other forms of copyrighted material. Indeed in talking about changes the Government website cites ebooks as an example:

The personal copying exception permits you to make copies of media (CDs, ebooks etc) you have bought, for private purposes such as format shifting or backup without infringing copyright

Again IANAL and it's clearly not over. but, if they do revise the law to have some blank media tax then I wonder if it will affect ebooks? Since there isn't really any blank media per se in ereading maybe it would be a tax on ereaders themselves, or on ebooks. Or simply giving the rights holders a slice of the VAT they already collect.

[ 41 replies ]


Sat June 20 2015

MobileRead Week in Review: 06/13 - 06/20

06:00 AM by Alexander Turcic in Miscellaneous | Week in Review

Welcome to another digest entry of MobileRead, where we transform the profound into the bite-sized.

E-Book General - News

E-Book General - Reading Recommendations

E-Book Readers - Amazon Kindle


July 2015 Book Club Nominations

12:01 AM by WT Sharpe in Reading Recommendations | Book Clubs

Help us select the book that the MobileRead Book Club will read for July, 2015.

The nominations will run through midnight EST June 26 or until 10 books have made the list. The poll will then be posted and will remain open for five days.

Book selection category for July is: Non-Fiction

In order for a book to be included in the poll it needs THREE NOMINATIONS (original nomination, a second and a third).

How Does This Work?
The Mobile Read Book Club (MRBC) is an informal club that requires nothing of you. Each month a book is selected by polling. On the last week of that month a discussion thread is started for the book. If you want to participate feel free. There is no need to "join" or sign up. All are welcome.

How Does a Book Get Selected?
Each book that is nominated will be listed in a poll at the end of the nomination period. The book that polls the most votes will be the official selection.

How Many Nominations Can I Make?
Each participant has 3 nominations. You can nominate a new book for consideration or nominate (second, third) one that has already been nominated by another person.

How Do I Nominate a Book?
Please just post a message with your nomination. If you are the FIRST to nominate a book, please try to provide an abstract to the book so others may consider their level of interest.

How Do I Know What Has Been Nominated?
Just follow the thread. This message will be updated with the status of the nominations as often as I can. If one is missed, please just post a message with a multi-quote of the 3 nominations and it will be added to the list ASAP.

When is the Poll?
The poll thread will open at the end of the nomination period, or once there have been 10 books with 3 nominations each. At that time a link to the initial poll thread will be posted here and this thread will be closed.

The floor is open to nominations. Please comment if you discover a nomination is not available as an ebook in your area.


Official choices with three nominations each:

(1) The Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Patricia Clark Memorial Library: Kindle | Project Gutenberg: Various formats | Librivox (audiobook)

Spoiler:
From Wikipedia:

Meditations (Medieval Greek: Τὰ εἰς ἑαυτόν Ta eis heauton, literally "[that which is] to himself") is a series of personal writings by Marcus Aurelius, Roman Emperor from 161 to 180 CE, recording his private notes to himself and ideas on Stoic philosophy.

Marcus Aurelius wrote the 12 books of the Meditations in Koine Greek as a source for his own guidance and self-improvement. It is possible that large portions of the work were written at Sirmium, where he spent much time planning military campaigns from 170 to 180. Some of it was written while he was positioned at Aquincum on campaign in Pannonia, because internal notes tell us that the second book was written when he was campaigning against the Quadi on the river Granova (modern-day Hron) and the third book was written at Carnuntum.

It is unlikely that Marcus Aurelius ever intended the writings to be published and the work has no official title, so "Meditations" is one of several titles commonly assigned to the collection. These writings take the form of quotations varying in length from one sentence to long paragraphs.

(2) Pitching in a Pinch by Christy Mathewson
Amazon US / Barnes & Noble / Kobo

Spoiler:
This is considered one of the greatest baseball books ever written. Leopold Classic Library issued a new edition three months ago, calling it "a significant literary work."

(3) Rites of Peace: The Fall of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna by Adam Zamoyski
Amazon US / Kobo US

Spoiler:
From Goodreads:

In the wake of Napoleon's disastrous Russian campaign of 1812, the French emperor's imperious grip on Europe began to weaken, raising the question of how the continent was to be reconstructed after his defeat. While the Treaty of Paris that followed Napoleon's exile in 1814 put an end to a quarter century of revolution and war in Europe, it left the future of the continent hanging in the balance.

Eager to negotiate a workable and lasting peace, the major powers—Britain, Austria, Prussia, and Russia—along with a host of lesser nations, began a series of committee sessions in Vienna: an eight-month-long carnival that combined political negotiations with balls, dinners, artistic performances, hunts, tournaments, picnics, and other sundry forms of entertainment for the thousands of aristocrats who had gathered in the Austrian capital. Although the Congress of Vienna resulted in an unprecedented level of stability in Europe, the price of peace would be high. Many of the crucial questions were decided on the battlefield or in squalid roadside cottages amid the vagaries of war. And the proceedings in Vienna itself were not as decorous as is usually represented.

Internationally bestselling author Adam Zamoyski draws on a wide range of original sources, which include not only official documents, private letters, diaries, and firsthand accounts, but also the reports of police spies and informers, to reveal the steamy atmosphere of greed and lust in which the new Europe was forged. Meticulously researched, masterfully told, and featuring a cast of some of the most influential and powerful figures in history, including Tsar Alexander, Metternich, Talleyrand, and the Duke of Wellington, Rites of Peace tells the story of these extraordinary events and their profound historical consequences.

(4) The Beer Wench's Guide to Beer: An Unpretentious Guide to Craft Beer by Ashley V. Routson
Amazon US

Spoiler:
Pull up a stool and learn about beer with the Wench!

Craft beer is officially everywhere: there are now more breweries in the United States since any time before prohibition. At the local grocery store, the beer aisle is as big as the cereal aisle. At the bar, it's increasingly hard to choose a beer--the IPA is stronger than the ESB, right?

In this book, Ashley V. Routson (aka The Beer Wench) provides the first all-in-one guide that demystifies beer and makes learning fun. She'll quickly bring you up to speed on beer styles, the brewing process, how to taste beer like a pro, and how to pair beer with food. Unconventional tastings, delicious recipes from killer craft breweries, eye-catching photos--and, of course, plenty of beer--means there's never a dull moment.

(5) This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women by Dan Gediman and Jay Allison
Amazon Ca / Amazon US / Barnes & Noble / Kobo

Spoiler:
From Goodreads

Based on the National Public Radio series of the same name, This I Believe features eighty essayists--from the famous to the unknown--completing the thought that begins the book's title. Each piece compels readers to rethink not only how they have arrived at their own personal beliefs but also the extent to which they share them with others.

Featuring a well-known list of contributors--including Isabel Allende, Colin Powell, Gloria Steinem, William F. Buckley Jr., Penn Jillette, Bill Gates, and John Updike--the collection also contains essays by a Brooklyn lawyer; a part-time hospital clerk from Rehoboth, Massachusetts; a woman who sells Yellow Pages advertising in Fort Worth, Texas; and a man who serves on the state of Rhode Island's parole board.

The result is a stirring and provocative trip inside the minds and hearts of a diverse group of people whose beliefs--and the incredibly varied ways in which they choose to express them--reveal the American spirit at its best.

(6) What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by Randall Munroe
Amazon Ca / Amazon UK / Amazon US / Barnes and Noble / Google Play / Kobo US

Spoiler:
From Goodreads:

Randall Munroe left NASA in 2005 to start up his hugely popular site XKCD 'a web comic of romance, sarcasm, math and language' which offers a witty take on the world of science and geeks. It's had over a billion page hits to date. A year ago Munroe set up a new section - What If - where he tackles a series of impossible questions: If your cells suddenly lost the power to divide, how long would you survive? How dangerous is it, really, in a pool in a thunderstorm? If we hooked turbines to people exercising in gyms, how much power could we produce? What if everyone only had one soulmate? From what height would you need to drop a steak to ensure it was cooked by the time it reached the ground? What would happen if the moon went away? This book gathers together the best entries along with lots of new gems. From The Lord of the Rings, Star Trek and the songs of Tim Minchin, through chemistry, geography and physics, Munroe leaves no stone unturned in his quest for knowledge. And his answers are witty and memorable and studded with hilarious cartoons and infographics. Far more than a book for geeks, WHAT IF explains the laws of science in operation in a way that every intelligent reader will enjoy and feel the smarter for having read.

(7) Waterloo by Bernard Cornwell
Amazon UK / Amazon US / Audible / Barnes & Noble / Overdrive

Spoiler:
#1 Bestseller in the U.K.

From the New York Times bestselling author and master of martial fiction comes the definitive, illustrated history of one of the greatest battles ever fought—a riveting nonfiction chronicle published to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Napoleon’s last stand.

On June 18, 1815 the armies of France, Britain and Prussia descended upon a quiet valley south of Brussels. In the previous three days, the French army had beaten the Prussians at Ligny and fought the British to a standstill at Quatre-Bras. The Allies were in retreat. The little village north of where they turned to fight the French army was called Waterloo. The blood-soaked battle to which it gave its name would become a landmark in European history.

In his first work of nonfiction, Bernard Cornwell combines his storytelling skills with a meticulously researched history to give a riveting chronicle of every dramatic moment, from Napoleon’s daring escape from Elba to the smoke and gore of the three battlefields and their aftermath. Through quotes from the letters and diaries of Emperor Napoleon, the Duke of Wellington, and the ordinary officers and soldiers, he brings to life how it actually felt to fight those famous battles—as well as the moments of amazing bravery on both sides that left the actual outcome hanging in the balance until the bitter end.

Published to coincide with the battle’s bicentennial in 2015, Waterloo is a tense and gripping story of heroism and tragedy—and of the final battle that determined the fate of nineteenth-century Europe.

The nominations are now closed.

[ 27 replies ]


Thu June 18 2015

ALL-New Paperwhite announced: 300dpi E-Ink screen

04:47 AM by gebederry in E-Book General | News

enhanced PPI and RAM

Amazon US link

Amazon CA link

Amazon JP link

Amazon UK link


[See also the thread in the Kindle forum]

[ 152 replies ]


"All-New" Kindle Paperwhite with 300ppi display - June 30th

04:46 AM by j777p in E-Book Readers | Amazon Kindle

Shipping June 30th

$119
£109


"New, Highest Resolution Paperwhite Display—300 Pixels per Inch for Laser-Quality Text

The new Kindle Paperwhite adds our highest resolution Paperwhite display, delivering the same 300 pixels per inch that readers love about the top-of-the-line Kindle Voyage. With unsurpassed resolution and 2x the pixels as the previous generation Kindle Paperwhite, the display delivers laser-quality text, making it easy to read comfortably at any font size, including at smaller fonts so you can fit more words on each page. Even with the new higher resolution display, Kindle Paperwhite delivers battery life that is measured in weeks rather than hours.

New Bookerly Font and Typography Features—Read Faster With Less Eyestrain

Kindle Paperwhite now offers Bookerly, an exclusive font designed from the ground up for reading on digital screens. Warm and contemporary, Bookerly is inspired by the artistry of the best fonts in modern print books, but is hand-crafted for great readability at any size. It introduces a lighter, more graceful look and outperforms other digital reading fonts to help customers read faster with less eyestrain. See Bookerly: www.amazon.com/bookerly.

The new Kindle Paperwhite also offers an all-new typesetting engine that lays out words just as the author intended:

Hyphenation and improved spacing—Kindle Paperwhite adds hyphenation to break words at the right place, creates paragraphs with consistent lines, and adjusts the space between words. This results in more natural word spacing and more words on each page, which allows for faster reading with less eyestrain. See an example: www.amazon.com/hyphenation.

Improved character placement—New kerning and ligatures automatically adjust character spacing to make it easier and faster to recognize words at any font size. Similar to a typesetter formatting a print book, Kindle Paperwhite will look at neighboring pairs of letters in context and adjust the character spacing to suit the word, removing distracting whitespace between letters and making the shape of the word more beautiful to help with word recognition speed. For example, in the word “quietly”, the tail of the “y” loops under the “l” to make the letters of the word fit better together. In the word “first”, the “f” and “i” are drawn together to make a ligature. See an example: www.amazon.com/characterspacing.

Beautiful page layout—Print books often use drop caps to add emphasis and beauty to the first page of a chapter. In eBooks, this is challenging to replicate given the ability to adjust font size and line spacing. The new typesetting engine presents drop caps, text, and images on Kindle just as the author intended, and dynamically adjusts the layout as the reader changes the text size. See an example: www.amazon.com/dropcaps.

Large fonts, without compromises—One of the benefits of reading on Kindle is that you can customize the font size based on personal preference—over half of Kindle customers take advantage of this feature and use a font size larger than the default. As you increase the size of a font, fewer words appear on each page, often creating distractions like large white space or broken sentences. Now, Kindle Paperwhite automatically adapts when a reader chooses the largest font sizes, customizing the margins, columns, indents, nested lists, borders, and drop caps to keep the page easy to read. See an example: www.amazon.com/largefonts."

The new Kindle Paperwhite is $119. It is available for pre-order around the world and will start shipping June 30. Order now at www.amazon.com/paperwhite.

[ 226 replies ]




live view Latest Forum Activity
Thread / Thread Starter Last Post
Today 05:57 AM
by chaley (#100) Go to first new post
Today 05:55 AM
by Notjohn (#49) Go to first new post
Today 05:50 AM
by HarryT (#600) Go to first new post
Today 05:48 AM
by chaot (#6) Go to first new post
Today 05:38 AM
by HarryT (#29) Go to first new post
Forum: News
Today 05:35 AM
by HarryT (#0) Go to first new post
Today 05:35 AM
by embryo (#18) Go to first new post
Forum: PocketBook
Today 05:33 AM
by brucelee (#2) Go to first new post
Forum: Lounge
Today 05:27 AM
by JoHunt (#64511) Go to first new post
Today 05:27 AM
by anki (#631) Go to first new post
Forum: Amazon Kindle
Today 05:27 AM
by HarryT (#4) Go to first new post
Forum: Devices
Today 05:23 AM
by Dopedangel (#175) Go to first new post
Unutterably Silly Question Everything? (Donnageddon)
Forum: Lounge
Today 05:22 AM
by Bilbo1967 (#5758) Go to first new post
Forum: Kobo Reader
Today 05:22 AM
by Nick_1964 (#138) Go to first new post
Today 05:21 AM
by embryo (#369) Go to first new post
Forum: Kobo Reader
Today 05:18 AM
by Nick_1964 (#1427) Go to first new post
Today 05:13 AM
by Lynx-lynx (#13461) Go to first new post
Today 05:11 AM
by MickeyC (#1) Go to first new post
Today 05:09 AM
by dickloraine (#93) Go to first new post
Today 05:00 AM
by Andanzas (#464) Go to first new post
Forum: Kobo Reader
Today 04:49 AM
by frostschutz (#49) Go to first new post
Today 04:39 AM
by kleinenun (#399) Go to first new post
Forum: Calibre
Today 04:28 AM
by GERGE (#19) Go to first new post
Forum: News
Today 04:16 AM
by murg (#8) Go to first new post
Today 04:06 AM
by GtrsRGr8 (#444) Go to first new post


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:57 AM.
MobileRead.com is a privately owned, operated and funded community.